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Peavey Max 126 vs. Line 6 LowDown Studio 110


Thunderbroom

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I want a small amp to keep in my office. I have a small Crate but plan to give it to Kindness to donate it someone. While it's okay, I just want something else. I think I've narrowed it down to the Peavey Max 126 and the Line 6 Studio 110.

 

The main factor for me is size. The next is price. Being able to handle a low B is important as well but I'm not sure how any small combo will really handle it.

 

Peavey Max 126

10w

1x6" speaker

11-1/4" x 11-3/4" x 7"

13 lbs.

$69 new

 

Line 6 Studio 110

75W

1x10" speaker

12"W x 12"H x 12"D

24 lbs.

$249 new

 

The Line6 is really on the high side of what I'm looking for and the Peavey is on the low. Both will fit in my office well. I've thought about the SWR Backline 110, the Roland Cube and others but for various reasons have eliminated them.

 

Have any of you tried either of these? If so, what are your thoughts. I'm not expecting miracles. I've got really nice stuff at home. I'm just looking for something to make noise with in the office when I have a break in between classes.

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i used to work for peavey, so take my opinion for what it is. i have a max 158. with the max series peavey opted to go with a deep sound over a clear sound. which may be your thing. i'm not very particular about my practice amps, so i make it work. it sees pretty limited duty. it's pretty hard to argue with for $70, even if it is an evolved guitar amp. but it doesn't have the features or the sound of the lowdown. (i've never played one, so i'm only guessing it sounds pretty decent.)

 

robb.

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I have the Peavey max 126 it is excellent for solo practice but that is about it unless you mic it.


prolly not the best amp for playing a low end b but there again it is only 10 watts.

 

Your first sentence just about sums it up for me.

:)

 

I'm going to keep this in my office at the college where I work. It doesn't need to be loud at all. I just need to be able to hear it at a decent but low level. I've got more than enough gear at home for practice/gigging.

 

I must admit that I am intrigued by the Line6 but there's a $180 difference between it and the Peavey.

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Bro, you practically live in Chicago. Your surrounded by li'l combos to try. Enjoy your musicianship! Take a day, run around town, and try a bunch. Hell, I'll go with ya! We can do lunch...
:cool:

 

I'm not interested in trying a bunch of stuff out. I just want a very small combo amp (12 cubic inches or less) for my office. If I had time, I would likely go out and check out a few but I'm working 60 - 70 hours per week right now. The idea of the combo is that I can practice some time between classes and other responsibilities that I have.

:)

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I'm not interested in trying a bunch of stuff out. I just want a very small combo amp (12 cubic inches or less) for my office. If I had time, I would likely go out and check out a few but I'm working 60 - 70 hours per week right now. The idea of the combo is that I can practice some time between classes and other responsibilities that I have.

:)

 

I'd just hold on to that Crate 'til you get the time. A big part of the fun of being a modern musician is trying out new/different gear. :)

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I went to GC this afternoon and tried both.

 

PV Max 126

Very compact.

Handled the low B a low volume.

The problem was that I couldn't even hear the thing in GC with the thing dimed and it wasn't THAT loud in there. Engaging the "Vintage" switch helped but it was still hard to hear.

Not sure if this would be an issue in my office though.

Damn.

 

Line6 Lowdown 110

Small...one cubic foot.

Pricey @ $250

Rated at 75w was easily heard in GC.

The amp models were fun to play with.

Not sure if I want to spend the extra green for something that will see little actual playing time in the grand scheme of things.

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i'd say the Line 6, although i hate 80% of Line 6's products, because it has in built effects, etc... its alot more fun to play...

 

 

I'm seriously leaning towards the Line6. I've been searching high and low for an amp that is a one foot cube or smaller. There just aren't many to choose from. I'm concerned to the "suddenly die" comment from rummy but I've yet to read one of those reviews.

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I'm seriously leaning towards the Line6. I've been searching high and low for an amp that is a one foot cube or smaller. There just aren't many to choose from. I'm concerned to the "suddenly die" comment from rummy but I've yet to read one of those reviews.

 

 

I think it was the first batch that had those problems. I have one from the first batch and supposedly it has some rumored "headphone bug" but I haven't noticed it as I don't used headphones - if I'm going to headphone, I use the PodXT thorugh my mixer to blend in musical content.

 

I'm sorry I didn't answer sooner, but I really haven't used a 5 string on it. I stick with 4's as much as I can these days. It sounds like you figured it all out though on a trip to GC.

 

The thing I like about the combo is it gets nice and loud. In practice, I can almost use it with a live drummer depending on what we're playing.

 

To maximize loudness, I suggest this procedure:

 

1) Select an amp model. I like the Rock setting but I'm a rock guy, the clean setting is an Eden type setting. Grind is if you want to give it some obious distortion and can sound nifty.

 

2) Set your gain setting to taste.

 

3) EQ to taste.

 

4) Set the compressor. This is modeled after the LA2A limiter/comp, so it adjusts the volume as you turn it up and compress more. This is where you really squeeze out extra vol. You want it to blink every now and then when you play hard, not stay on... it will sound "squished" if you do.

 

5) Adjust master to taste.

 

Oh, and btw... in a bind, you could use this at a show as a large DI or a small amp. There's a DI out on the back that will feed the sound board the "miced" sound of the combo. If you're using the Rock setting, that's like sending a mic of one speaker of an Ampeg SVT - 810 combo! It actually works pretty well.

 

Hope that helps!

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Hope that helps!

 

I'm seriously leaning this way!

 

On a somewhat related note, I tried a few basses while at GC.

 

Used Tune 6 String

I'm sure it's a fine instrument but the neck was like the deck on an aircraft carrier...:eek:

 

Schecter 5 String

Don't remember which one but the B was sooo floppy...way more than any of my BEAD tuned basses.

 

Squier 5 String Jazz

I really, really liked this bass. The B string was really tight and it sounded nice.

 

Epiphone Explorer

I liked this one as well. It felt good and sounded pretty good through the Ampeg rig that I played it through.

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