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zzzxtreme

noob question - making tracks sound more "warm"

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hi guys, I record using roland octacapture, 44.1khz 24bit with Reaper. apparently the roland is very very flat and neutral, so it can sound boring. my korg keyboard has 32Khz samples and I absolutely love it, is there a way to convert tracks in Reaper to 32Khz ? Or is there a better way to do it using plugins ? Or perhaps somekind of affordable external 1 or 2 channel hardware?

 

any advice greatly appreciated !!!

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All interfaces are supposed to record flat. The trick is to capture the entire frequency spectrum of

the source and not add any color. Then if you want color, you either change the source or you add it mixing.

If you only have a single instrument recordded, and it doesnt fill the entire frequency spectrum from 20~20K

its will sound nutreal based on its frequency range. Its when you have many instruments recorded,

each using part of that frequency spectrum and displaying its own dynamics that a mix begins to take shape.

 

Having 32 bit isnt going to make the recording sound warmer or better. If you cant get a great sounding recording at

CD quality of 16/44, then you're looking in the wrong place to fix your problem.

Electronics can only capture what you perform as a musician.

Recordings are truth detectors. Its like looking at yourself in a mirror.

You have to be honest with yourself and decide weather you like what you see.

If you listen to a flat frequency recording that has no effects added and you dont like what you hear,

it comes down to being a musicianship/performance problem you have to focus on.

 

Experienced musicans can often visualize themselves playing in front of an audiance

when they record and carry through the emotion they would feel when they play the notes

and capture all that nervous energy in the recording. If you record without any kind of emotion

your recording will be as flat as Kelcey's Corn flakes.

 

They havent made a plugin thats called emotion yet. When thy do you can hang up your instruments for good.

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There are various tape sat and other "warm" plugins kicking around, but like WRGKMC says, it comes down to the mics and the playing - or recording on tape ;)

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Recordings are truth detectors. Its like looking at yourself in a mirror.

 

:lol:

 

 

Recording is a mirror - if an ape looks into it an apostle is hardly likely to look out

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^^ True with recording as well. The recording medium only regurgitates a duplicate of what its fed.

If its fed garbage it regurgitates garbage.

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He didn't say 32 bit, he said 32khz. Maybe the keyboard uses samples with a lower sample rate than CD quality, and the lack of high end is perceived as "warm."

 

In any case, that same audio quality would carry over to the DAW whether you used a digital or analog inputs to record the output of the keyboard. The native sample rate of the session doesn't matter. Those keyboard samples are going to have the same frequency content no matter what you use to record them.

 

If you want the entire mix to have that same quality, you could put a very steep LPF on the mix around 16khz. I wouldn't recommend it, but sometimes I do that to individual tracks. Particularly electric guitar or bass tracks.

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thanks all. much to learn , will take time to digest what's been said here. zooey, u're right about the lack of high end on my korg 01/w especially, sounds "warm and cold" at the same time

 

its kinda overwhelming for a beginner to learn mixing, i just don't know where to start.

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It can be overwhelming, but above all, it's supposed to be fun. Just jump in and start experimenting. You're not going to break anything.

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He didn't say 32 bit, he said 32khz. Maybe the keyboard uses samples with a lower sample rate than CD quality, and the lack of high end is perceived as "warm."

 

I understand now. Didnt realize he was talking about the recorded samples in the keyboard.

That keyboard had non standard sample rates recorded at 16 bit 32 kHz.

Subsequent Korg synths had their samples recorded at 16 bit 44.1 kHz, reducing the available high end.

In either case, they were close to CD quality and its the content of the samples that are warm.

that has little to do with his recording sample rates. Even a compressed MP3 format can sound warm if its mixed properly.

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hi guys, I record using roland octacapture, 44.1khz 24bit with Reaper. apparently the roland is very very flat and neutral, so it can sound boring. my korg keyboard has 32Khz samples and I absolutely love it, is there a way to convert tracks in Reaper to 32Khz ? Or is there a better way to do it using plugins ? Or perhaps somekind of affordable external 1 or 2 channel hardware?

 

You don't say what you're recording through the Roland, but samples at 32kHz won't have frequencies above 16kHz, so try putting a low-pass filter on the mix. You might also try a tape saturation plugin, which combines reduced high frequencies with mild distortion.

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hi guys, I record using roland octacapture, 44.1khz 24bit with Reaper. apparently the roland is very very flat and neutral, so it can sound boring. my korg keyboard has 32Khz samples and I absolutely love it, is there a way to convert tracks in Reaper to 32Khz ? Or is there a better way to do it using plugins ? Or perhaps somekind of affordable external 1 or 2 channel hardware?


any advice greatly appreciated !!!

When tracking, there are some who want to cling to the sound of analog tape, with often diminished HF response, slurred transients, and reduced LF accuracy in the form of the familiar head bump and LF drop-off below it. But that's not enough, so they hit the tape hard to produce a characteristic form of saturation distortion. None of that is, of course, accurate. Accurate delivers back out what you put into it.

 

There are virtual tape saturation plugins and boxes, as well as various vintage compressors and their plug in more-or-less equivalents. But it's worth considering that compression and saturation are arguably the trickiest things we ask our plugins and virtual devices to do. However, a lot of folks do find plug in compression to largely work quite well (I know I do, though I also use HW compression in my input chain).

 

Saturation distortion, though, remains a bit of a grail in the virtual world. One aspect of the situation is that the original designs of our older technologies were designed to try to avoid those distortions as much as possible. Such distortion was a byproduct of engineers trying to raise signal levels above the high noisefloor of tape and vinyl. (Also, on vinyl records, it was a byproduct of cutting singles way hot in order to have the loudest track in the jukebox. The digital generation did NOT invent the 'loudness wars,' despite what some pop-tech know nothings write.)

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:lol:


Recording is a mirror - if an ape looks into it an apostle is hardly likely to look out

 

No....but a politician might......

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if you can't play "warm", then no technology from this planet can fix that - you must send your tracks to another solar system for renovation - i heard on Alpha Centaury they have the technology to make sound doo doo like music

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