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Migraines


Thunderbroom

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for the moment, from time to time... a present from my mum, which have it chronical.... Do you have it often ?

 

 

Not regularly. What prompted this thread was that I got a migraine headache yesterday and had to cancel my night class. It's the first one I've had in more than 6 months. I've had a year or more go by without one and at other times have had 2 or 3 in the same month. I've yet to figure out what triggers it.

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Mine come and go. I've gone years without them, or had several in a month. The last 2 years or so, they haven't been horrendous. But about 4 years ago I got a killer, took my imitrex, and later the same day got a rebound that was far worse than the original and threw me off for days!

 

I note them on my calendar, including the time they hit, and how bad my eyes, the sickness, or the head pain is.

 

No idea what can trigger them other than sometimes bright light or sharp glare can do it.

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my mum have two different migraines:

- classical migraines

- tension headache

that's what said neurologist. The first is easy to calm > drugs > she tried everything she could have

The second one is due to stress. So she saw a strange doctor which make her acunpuncture, and said to her to ripp off all electrical thing plugged in her bedroom. Since that, she's better. She always have it but less than before.

 

For me, i made relaxation therapy for general stress issue, and it helps very good when i have migraines.

And i noticed that a famous amrican soda (in his "blak" version) calm it too. :idea:

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Mine started senior year in high school. Didn't know what it was, because I don't get all of the symptoms (luckily I don't get nauseous), and until I learned to practice deep-breathing at the onset, I'd get tingling in my fingers and lips, and not be able to form a coherent sentence...there's nothing like being almost debilitated and unable to communicate that there's a problem!

 

I too have little solid knowledge of why I get them. It seems that bright lights can trigger, but i'm not entirely sure it's just a symptom and not the trigger itself. Aspartame is a real possibility, since any time I've had it I seem to get one sometime later, but it wasn't even invented when I first started getting them. At any rate I avoid it like the plague.

 

I find that if I practice deep regular breathing, take caffeine and Tylenol/Excedrine/etc and especially if I can get someone to massage the back of my neck and temples, I can avoid the majority of symptoms except the vision problems...flashing, spots, tunnel-vision or the opposite where I can only see peripherally. I will always get the rebound headache the next day, where my head physically hurts...sneezing or shaking my head makes it feel as if my brain is bouncing around in my skull. Nice:rolleyes:

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Caffeine is bad for migraines as it restricts the blood vessels. I used to get migraines (no pain, just total loss of vision), but they have completely gone away fro the past 10 years. For me the triggers were dehydration and lack of sleep.

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Caffeine is bad for migraines as it restricts the blood vessels. I used to get migraines (no pain, just total loss of vision), but they have completely gone away fro the past 10 years. For me the triggers were dehydration and lack of sleep.

 

 

One indicator of migraine is dilation of the blood vessels at the neck and base of the skull, so vasoconstrictors are typically the correct treatment. Caffeine has been recommended to me by my doctor and it definitely helps. However, one condition is that in order for it to really work, you should not normally include caffeine in your daily diet.

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One indicator of migraine is dilation of the blood vessels at the neck and base of the skull, so vasoconstrictors are typically the correct treatment. Caffeine has been recommended to me by my doctor and it definitely helps. However, one condition is that in order for it to really work, you should not normally include caffeine in your daily diet.

 

 

Fair enough. My migraines were the exact opposite. The constricted blood vessels would prevent enough blood from getting to my eyes and I'd go blind for some period of time. Fun stuff.

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Fair enough. My migraines were the exact opposite. The constricted blood vessels would prevent enough blood from getting to my eyes and I'd go blind for some period of time. Fun stuff.

 

 

Yeah, joy of joys.

 

It could be that the dilation was essentially draining blood and dropping the pressure supplying the blood vessels to your eyes. The real fun is that aside from the vessel dilation, doctors aren't too sure about anything regarding migraine.

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Yeah, joy of joys.


It could be that the dilation was essentially draining blood and dropping the pressure supplying the blood vessels to your eyes. The real fun is that aside from the vessel dilation, doctors aren't too sure about anything regarding migraine.

 

 

I'm just happy to not have them currently. Suddenly going blind while driving sucks.

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