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how do i do this on bass?


bassdudeguy

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at 22 seconds the bassist hits a harmonic but then slides up the neck....
:freak:

does anyone here know how to do that?

Jeff Ament used to play Even Flow on a fretless. Moving harmonics around on a fretless is just a matter of sliding your finger along the fingerboard.

 

Emre

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Jeff Ament used to play Even Flow on a fretless. Moving harmonics around on a fretless is just a matter of sliding your finger along the fingerboard.


Emre

 

 

It's a bit trickier than that..seeming as how I can do it one out of ever 20 tries:). You need a fretless and an incredibly accurate fretting pressure to achieve it. My fretless god, Tony Franklin, can pull it off quite well.

 

 

Dan

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Jeff Ament used to play Even Flow on a fretless. Moving harmonics around on a fretless is just a matter of sliding your finger along the fingerboard.


Emre

 

 

 

Sounds so easy, but it isn't, and I'm better than your average bear on a fretless. I usually lose the harmonic. Maybe he has it compressed bigtime.

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Sounds so easy, but it isn't, and I'm better than your average bear on a fretless. I usually lose the harmonic. Maybe he has it compressed bigtime.

 

 

the TF is killer for these because of it's natural voice but it's frickin' irritating trying to pull it off sometimes.

 

 

Dan

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It's a bit trickier than that..seeming as how I can do it one out of ever 20 tries:). You need a fretless and an incredibly accurate fretting pressure to achieve it. My fretless god, Tony Franklin, can pull it off quite well.



Dan

 

I was goofing one day, and I saw how to do it. I can move a harmonic on a fretted bass, now. :p Three frets, max, as far as I've seen.

 

With fretless, you can't let off of the harmonic. You've got to "hold" the position for the harmonic after hitting it, and, then, you slide. I think...

 

Hahaha.

 

Have fun trying to find your way, regardless. :)

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It's a bit trickier than that..seeming as how I can do it one out of ever 20 tries:). You need a fretless and an incredibly accurate fretting pressure to achieve it. My fretless god, Tony Franklin, can pull it off quite well.

I've never had much trouble :confused:

 

It's very easy if you use an artificial harmonic. The way I do it is I pluck with my ring finger and hit the harmonic node with my index finger. It's a trick I learned from an old Steve Bailey video.

 

Emre

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Sounds so easy, but it isn't, and I'm better than your average bear on a fretless. I usually lose the harmonic. Maybe he has it compressed bigtime.

It's just like getting a "pinched harmonic" on a Les Paul. You need cranked mids, some OD, and some compression. When I use the bridge pickup on one of my Jazzes, the harmonics literally leap out. No sweat.

 

Emre

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I'd like to see that!

I'll show you the next time I'm in Chicago. It's weird at first and takes some practice (you need to figure out exactly where to tap the string with your index finger as you pluck with your ring finger).

 

If you want to see more, check out the "Bass Extremes" video with Victor Wooten and Steve Bailey. That's where I first saw it. Baily uses harmonics like crazy.

 

Emre

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That's cool! It's different from how I do it. I'll have to try that.

 

I actually fret the note with my left hand (as if I'm going to hit it normally). The trick is in how you simultaneously pluck the string and hit the harmonic with my right hand. Since you're already fretting the note, it's very easy to slide the harmonic up or down.

 

Like I said, it's just like hitting a pinched harmonic on a guitar when you're playing along some ZZ Top tune.

 

Emre

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That's cool! It's different from how I do it. I'll have to try that.


I actually fret the note with my left hand (as if I'm going to hit it normally). The trick is in how you simultaneously pluck the string and hit the harmonic with my right hand. Since you're already fretting the note, it's very easy to slide the harmonic up or down.


Like I said, it's just like hitting a pinched harmonic on a guitar when you're playing along some ZZ Top tune.


Emre

 

Yeah, a harmonic and an artificial harmonic are different in that respect, as well as in pitch and tone. It's much easier for me to move artificials in the way that you described. :)

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Now, see, this video looks like he pinches the string down to solidly hit the fingerboard. First, gets the harmonic, then pinches to fingerboard contact, and then slides, while the finger is against the fretboard. Right there it's different from what I'm trying to do. I try to keep it finger-to-string contact only, without pressing hard enough to contact the fingerboard. Will have to try this, and see if I can perfect it.

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Okay, spill, what's the difference between a real harmonic and an artificial?


Haha. The JD's fantastic at harmonics, the Cort's fair. Have been playing the JD a lot the last few days.
:)

 

A natural(I guess you'd call them natural) harmonic is just over the fret that you've selected. An artificial harmonic is basically you fretting a note that makes an "open string". You then use another digit to "fret" the string higher up while plucking, and thusly produce a note above the original range. Also known as pinch harmonics. I don't like that term, myself, because I think of them as notes. There is no "one" sweet spot for artificial harmonics. Some areas of the string do better, some take more work, but yeah. Hope I... did something helpful.

 

[YOUTUBE]WynyclRao34[/YOUTUBE]

 

Mr. Bailey here is prone to use his index, but he also uses his thumb for many things. I use my thumb, normally.

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It's a bit trickier than that..seeming as how I can do it one out of ever 20 tries:). You need a fretless and an incredibly accurate fretting pressure to achieve it. My fretless god, Tony Franklin, can pull it off quite well.



Dan

 

ya well

you don't need a fretless to do that it is really a matter of having a bass that has good intonation and one of these248128.jpg you can also pull it off with a wide ring band

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I used to do this when I was a violinist with artificial harmonics all the time. Same principle on fretless, I'm sure, as described.

 

That said - I don't think I've ever tried on bass. I imagine scale length and where you are on the neck would make this easier or harder.

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