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Lightweight Tuning Machines


ThudMaker

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I've got the Hipshot Ultralites on my Modulus. They are significantly lighter than the stock Gotoh that were on it. I'm not a fan of Schaller anything really, so I can't comment on those.

 

They did make the bass a little lighter, but nothing crazy. I could feel the difference at first though. Now...after the honeymoon is over...it's still heavy!

 

They are really nice tuners though...

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Sperzels are really light. They make a big deal over the locking mechanism. However, I found that in order to get the break angle over the nut right, I still had to wrap the string several times around the post, defeating the advantage of the lock.

 

Gotoh GB7 tuners are light, and very inexpensive. I have put them on several basses that had the regular Fender vintage style tuners, and noticed a difference in neck dive.

 

A couple ounces way out there does matter.

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It depends on the bass. If it was built with a proper headstock breaking angle or a string tree, you don't need to wrap anything.

frettedhead.jpg

If you use them on a typical Fender headstock, you will get the old A string rattling issue. Sperzel make low profile tuners that handle the issue just fine but they're hard to get by.

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It depends on the bass. If it was built with a proper headstock breaking angle or a string tree, you don't need to wrap anything.

If you use them on a typical Fender headstock, you will get the old A string rattling issue.

 

IMO that's the absolute worst aspect of the Fender design. :mad:

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Yeah. It's been going on since they first came out and even high end builders like Sadowsky didn't bother solving the issue.

 

 

We both know it is because of what the consumers will buy and not what the luthiers want to build. Roger Sadowsky knows very well that an angled headstock is superior in nearly every respect, but if he used one he'd lose sales from all of the traditionalists that don't understand the advantage of evolving designs. "I'll go buy a Lakland/Celinder/A-C/etc. since it looks more like a Fender."

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We both know it is because of what the consumers will buy and not what the luthiers want to build. Roger Sadowsky knows very well that an angled headstock is superior in nearly every respect, but if he used one he'd lose sales from all of the traditionalists that don't understand the advantage of evolving designs. "I'll go buy a Lakland/Celinder/A-C/etc. since it looks more like a Fender."

 

You've just summed up my whole view of Fender and bass buyers. The buyers are the main cause for 99% of basses still being of the stone age variety.;)

 

On a related note, I just found out that Bud LeCompte has now gone to an angled headstock an nearly all of his designs. Mine have his flat headstock, and I still need to make sure I leave enough wraps to keep from buzzing. I'm tempted to put on a retainer bar, but if he found out I defiled his work I'd be cut off...

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You've just summed up my whole view of Fender and bass buyers. The buyers are the main cause for 99% of basses still being of the stone age variety.
;)

On a related note, I just found out that Bud LeCompte has now gone to an angled headstock an nearly all of his designs. Mine have his flat headstock, and I still need to make sure I leave enough wraps to keep from buzzing. I'm tempted to put on a retainer bar, but if he found out I defiled his work I'd be cut off...

 

I was channeling you for that mini-rant. Obviously if you look at my basses, I am not pushing the envelope in design... :wave:

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I was channeling you for that mini-rant. Obviously if you look at my basses, I am not pushing the envelope in design...
:wave:

 

Ha ha!

 

Actually I'd hardly say that angled headstocks are even remotely close to pushing the envelope. They've know for like, 100's of years that they are superior. Leo just didn't seem to understand that little design fact though...:p

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Ha ha!


Actually I'd hardly say that angled headstocks are even remotely close to pushing the envelope. They've know for like, 100's of years that they are superior. Leo just didn't seem to understand that little design fact though...
:p

 

I'm not saying that the fender design is the best, but Leo was a practical man, and his design is easily made with a single piece of wood. And it is strong, fewer broken headstock stories than another mfr who tried to do angled headstock necks out of a single piece of wood.

 

I haven't been playing bass that long (3 years) but with 2 wraps of my A string around the post, I have no idea what the rattling A string phenomenon is. Exactly when does it rattle?

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I'm not saying that the fender design is the best, but Leo was a practical man, and his design is easily made with a single piece of wood. And it is strong, fewer broken headstock stories than another mfr who tried to do angled headstock necks out of a single piece of wood.


I haven't been playing bass that long (3 years) but with 2 wraps of my A string around the post, I have no idea what the rattling A string phenomenon is. Exactly when does it rattle?

 

 

Strings rattle mostly when there is not a large enough break angle on the headstock side of the nut. The lack of break angle presents a problem because there is too little downward force holding the string in place in the slot. They will also rattle if the nut slots were filed for larger gauges or have worn such that they no longer provide a snug fit.

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Strings rattle mostly when there is not a large enough break angle on the headstock side of the nut. The lack of break angle presents a problem because there is too little downward force holding the string in place in the slot. They will also rattle if the nut slots were filed for larger gauges or have worn such that they no longer provide a snug fit.

 

 

I guess, I wasn't complete in my question, I understand the general mechanics of when strings rattle. What I meant was since I have never experienced this on my fender style headstocks when I have 2 wraps on the post, what exactly are people who HAVE experienced it doing to/with the string when it rattles? In hindsight, I probably should also have asked, how many wraps do they give the string.

 

But anyways, it appears to me that if you begin wraping the post midway and do 2 wraps, there won't be any issues. This, at least has been my experience.

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