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OT: Blade Runner at Olympics


D Aussie

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Actually, they said he can't enter because he will have "an unfair advantage"!


Guess his new legs are actually better at running than natural legs. At least the Olympic Committee thinks so.

 

 

Is it really that, or are they merely saying his spring loaded legs are different enough that there's no way of knowing whether or not they give him an unfair advantage or not?

 

 

...gotta admire the guy, though.

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Is it really that, or are they merely saying his spring loaded legs are different enough that there's no way of knowing whether or not they give him an unfair advantage or not?



...gotta admire the guy, though.

 

 

Absolutely, gotta admire him.

 

 

I say let him run.

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I think the issue the olympic committee is concerned with is that if they let him in now, sometime in the future when there are artificial limbs or mechanical devices that help people run faster there will be a precedent for allowing them in the olympics. The guy's story is great and I'm glad he's doing what he's doing, but I actually agree with the decision the olympic committee made.

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I think the issue the olympic committee is concerned with is that if they let him in now, sometime in the future when there are artificial limbs or mechanical devices that help people run faster there will be a precedent for allowing them in the olympics. The guy's story is great and I'm glad he's doing what he's doing, but I actually agree with the decision the olympic committee made.

 

 

+1

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If their studies are correct they say he uses 25% less energy than an able bodied runner which may mean he gets less buggered than a normal runner.

 

Maybe Nike or someone just has to go back to the drawing board and design some better running shoes for those bastages that still have real legs so they can keep up with him! I'm sure they're already looking at it.

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Maybe Nike or someone just has to go back to the drawing board and design some better running shoes for those bastages that still have real legs so they can keep up with him! I'm sure they're already looking at it.

 

I'm sure olympic runners are already using them. ;)

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No way.

This guy is born with bits of legs missing and he has new legs. I dont see that as a performance enhancement.

 

What about the incredibly tall Africans and their birth defect, allowing them to expend less energy when they run because they are 6'6"?

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No way.

This guy is born with bits of legs missing and he has new legs. I dont see that as a performance enhancement.

 

 

The advantage is the huge amount of spring energy that can be stored and released from the limb material. It's probably very similar to what bows are made out of. I'm not going to knock his efforts or accomplishments at all but he can very well have a big advantage over the rest.

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Yeah, i get what you are saying, but the man has no feet, nor ankles or other bits that runners normally have.

Where do the scientists get off saying it uses 25% less energy for him to run than it does for another runner.

Doesnt a very tall runner use less energy to cover the same distance/time as a shorter runner?

Should he be using, LESS energy effifcient running legs?

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Yeah, i get what you are saying, but the man has no feet, nor ankles or other bits that runners normally have.

Where do the scientists get off saying it uses 25% less energy for him to run than it does for another runner.

Doesnt a very tall runner use less energy to cover the same distance/time as a shorter runner?

Should he be using, LESS energy effifcient running legs?

 

 

If the spring effect is propelling him along he will be using less energy per distance as a normal runner. The faster speed makes the difference.

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Yeah, i get what you are saying, but the man has no feet, nor ankles or other bits that runners normally have.

Where do the scientists get off saying it uses 25% less energy for him to run than it does for another runner.

Doesnt a very tall runner use less energy to cover the same distance/time as a shorter runner?

Should he be using, LESS energy effifcient running legs?

 

 

Your argument makes no sense.

 

If they strapped a rocket to his back just because he wasn't born with legs, is that fair? You can get a good amount of extra energy pushed out of something like that.

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Running isn't just energy expended. It's also control, as with one's cadence, for example. This guy doesn't get the same feedback from the ground as a non-prosthetic athlete. What he gains in efficiency he loses in reaction time - all those nerve endings in your feet are there for a reason. I'd say it evens out.

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Running isn't just energy expended. It's also control, as with one's cadence, for example. This guy doesn't get the same feedback from the ground as a non-prosthetic athlete. What he gains in efficiency he loses in reaction time - all those nerve endings in your feet are there for a reason. I'd say it evens out.

 

 

+1. I think he's done the work to train for it, let him run. Seriously, the other runners can suck it up.

 

 

Dan

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Running isn't just energy expended. It's also control, as with one's cadence, for example. This guy doesn't get the same feedback from the ground as a non-prosthetic athlete. What he gains in efficiency he loses in reaction time - all those nerve endings in your feet are there for a reason. I'd say it evens out.

 

 

No, not even. That vid I posted shows an extreme example of what springs can do for a single human runner. The composite/fiberglass bow shafts in the prosthesis are the same thing. He can absorb and return WAY more energy than human feet, ankles, legs and knee's. He has a huge advantage there. Now, the design and materials of those legs could be dialed up or down for spring constants, and be extreme like the vid or more like real legs running. Who's to say or draw the line on specs like that to ensure fair and equal competition? It can't be done, so they should remain seperated.

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Running isn't just energy expended. It's also control, as with one's cadence, for example. This guy doesn't get the same feedback from the ground as a non-prosthetic athlete. What he gains in efficiency he loses in reaction time - all those nerve endings in your feet are there for a reason. I'd say it evens out.

Thankyou for eloquently saying what was on my mind when I could not.:thu:

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Running isn't just energy expended. It's also control, as with one's cadence, for example. This guy doesn't get the same feedback from the ground as a non-prosthetic athlete. What he gains in efficiency he loses in reaction time - all those nerve endings in your feet are there for a reason. I'd say it evens out.

 

A dozen or so experts who studied the issue for several months disagree...

 

Who's more likely to be correct? ;)

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