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Portability kills music


PiotreX

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My friend found this article. It's about music being compressed too much to keep the sound levels constant on contemporary albums. Give it a read. It certainly makes me want to try to stop using a compressor and put more thought and work into articulation.

 

http://www.rollingstone.com/news/story/17777619/the_death_of_high_fidelity"]Read the darn article ;)

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Vinyl is the ultimate in poor fidelity. "Warmth" is another way of saying distortion with an unnecessary EQ curve.

 

Portability doesn't kill music, bad songwriting does.

 

There isn't an engineer in the world who has to crank on the compressor if he really doesn't want to. Some of my favorite albums are some of the "softest" with the least compression. Make great albums without loads of compression and people will still buy them, Elliott Smith is a fine example of this.

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Vinyl is the ultimate in poor fidelity. "Warmth" is another way of saying distortion with an unnecessary EQ curve.


Portability doesn't kill music, bad songwriting does.


There isn't an engineer in the world who has to crank on the compressor if he really doesn't want to. Some of my favorite albums are some of the "softest" with the least compression. Make great albums without loads of compression and people will still buy them, Elliott Smith is a fine example of this.

Besides, have ya seen (or heard) the quality of speakers you can get for $4.99 at Big lots to connect to your computer??? My Polk Audio/ Onkyo Integrated amp system sounded just about the same, as my 3- way, off- brand computer set up, and actually has better placement.

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There isn't an engineer in the world who has to crank on the compressor if he really doesn't want to and doesn't care if he keeps his job or not.

 

Fixed :thu:

 

Sadly in so many pop and rock records these days a master won't be accepted by the artists or record company if it isn't as loud as the competition.

 

It's a sorry state of affairs but unfortunately I can't see it going away in commercial music any time soon. Granted, it's not the case for all genres though, just the commerical ones.

 

As for portability killing music? Nah, it's low quality compressed formats that do that. That's why I never keep mp3s ripped at less than 256kbps

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Besides, have ya seen (or heard) the quality of speakers you can get for $4.99 at Big lots to connect to your computer??? My Polk Audio/ Onkyo Integrated amp system sounded just about the same, as my 3- way, off- brand computer set up, and actually has better placement.

 

:lol::wave:

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Fixed
:thu:

Sadly in so many pop and rock records these days a master won't be accepted by the artists or record company if it isn't as loud as the competition.


It's a sorry state of affairs but unfortunately I can't see it going away in commercial music any time soon. Granted, it's not the case for all genres though, just the commerical ones.


As for portability killing music? Nah, it's low quality compressed formats that do that. That's why I never keep mp3s ripped at less than 256kbps

 

That is beside the point. If an engineer doesn't want to compress it, they don't need to take that gig. If they truly believe it is ruining music as a whole, they simply wouldn't do it. Instead they talk about how they are actively "ruining music" while they gladly pocket the paychecks for doing the exact thing they complain about. Its merely elitist posturing. Saying essentially "I come from a different time that was inherently better than things are now". I call bull{censored}. It wasn't better, it was different. If you want more dynamics, mix with more dynamics. If the band doesn't want that, find one that does. They are out there.

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No portable format has represented the pinnacle of fidelity.

 

Transistor radios? Nope.

 

Cassette players? Definitely not.

 

CD? It has the potential for better fidelity, although the players negate this somewhat.

 

If people want to listen to music on the go, they're probably not concerned with fidelity anyway. It's not like it "killed music" in the past.

 

 

Been discussed here already. Some people here don't get it and it turned into a "CD vs Vinyl" argument for some strange reason...which has nothing really to do with the article.

 

 

Consider that audio compression affects fidelity.

 

CD vs. vinyl is a discussion of fidelity.

 

While it doesn't exactly relate to the article, it's at least relevant, albeit tangentially.

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I don't really mind the slammed files as much as I do boring songs with piss poor playing and/or songwriting. I don't care for driving down the road constantly adjusting the volume, either so there are quite a few places where slamming a recording makes sense. Also, the more it is compressed, the less change in sound you get from one medium to the next, so an artist has some control over how their product sounds across the broad spectrum of music output devices.

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That is beside the point. If an engineer doesn't want to compress it, they don't need to take that gig. If they truly believe it is ruining music as a whole, they simply wouldn't do it. Instead they talk about how they are actively "ruining music" while they gladly pocket the paychecks for doing the exact thing they complain about. Its merely elitist posturing. Saying essentially "I come from a different time that was inherently better than things are now". I call bull{censored}. It wasn't better, it was different. If you want more dynamics, mix with more dynamics. If the band doesn't want that, find one that does. They are out there.

 

 

That's why I made the point that it's with commercial music. And I don't know any jobbing engineers that can be that selective with what gigs they take up. Hobbyists maybe...

 

Personally I don't think it's ruining music, nor did I say as much. I just think it's a huge shame that the full dynamic range of CD audio isn't exploited.

 

I also pointed out that its genre specific. I've never met a metal band who were happy with their record being considerably quieter than their peers.

 

And I don't come from a different time, I'm 22.

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