Jump to content

Earplugs or not during rehearsals?


db.

Recommended Posts

  • Members

We generally rehearse at very low volumes - low enough that we can hear the singing over the instruments. We just learning forms of tunes, and we've all been playing long enough we know what happens when you get out there and crank it up.


So no, I don't wear them fpr rehearsal.

 

This is what I've been trying to get our band to do. Sure, it's fun to crank it up and get the tasty tones, feel the bass, etc., but that can be reserved for gigs. I guess rehearsing at very low volumes is difficult to fathom for some musicians. :idk:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

I guess I'm on the other end with this. If you need earplugs, you're playing too loudly most likely. Use smaller amps or turn down.

 

+1

 

I will never again work with a band where I have to wonder whether or not I should be wearing earplugs at practice.

 

However, in certain styles of music it's going to be loud and if you want to keep playing, then get some good plugs like those recommended in this thread. It's a subtle way to tell the band that they are too loud, but it's also a clear way to indicate that you are too old. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

+1


I will never again work with a band where I have to wonder whether or not I should be wearing earplugs at practice.


However, in certain styles of music it's going to be loud and if you want to keep playing, then get some good plugs like those recommended in this thread. It's a subtle way to tell the band that they are too loud, but
it's also a clear way to indicate that you are too old.
;)

 

Or just more wise. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

I was going to audition for a band last week. After I talked to them and found out that guitar 1 used a 100 watt tube half stack and guitar 2 used a 100 watt tube full stack during rehearsal I passed. He said, "Yeah man, we play loud." If I have to wear plugs at rehearsal it ain't happening.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Bass make sound?


Me thought bass just shook stuff.


Og confused.

 

:lol:

 

Answer to the question is both. You need to practice playing at volume to get your sound right, but often depending on where you rehearse, its hard to hear the dynamics of everyones playing due to volume. So the best thing I've found is to rehearse the songs at low volume, discuss and work on it, then play the song at stage volume. We dont always do it, and normally just play loud, but its amazing how much it can improve the quality of a song and everyones overall level of tightness when you pull a song apart and listen to all the little nuances...

 

In my worthless opinion anyway;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

I use them at rehearsal and gigs.Hopefully one day I'll get to the IEM club. It's cymbal crashes that aggravate me the most,we keep our amps at floor level (no stacking at rehearsal) and that helps the pounding in the ears.I'm 50 years old now and if you're trying to speak to me from behind most of the time all I can hear is a muffled cadence,sort of like Charlie Browns teacher! If you can't afford really good ones just grab the ones at Home Depot or Lowes.Yea,they muffle the sound but you learn to adjust them a bit to let in a little more sound. Or you can be like me and memorize the phrase,I'm sorry I didn't hear you very well,to tack on to every conversation that someone tries to start with you. Suck it up and WEAR'EM!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

I wear them 100% of the time. (now)

I wear them on the Public Transit here as well, (they have square wheels on the the trains, I swear.)

Tinnitus sucks. Sucks, sucks, sucks.

I don't wear them if I am tracking - I will have in-ears or be playing softly enough (and I control the volume).

So yeah - Either play damn soft, or prepare to pay the price later.

My ears were fine until I hit 35 or so, now conversations are hard to follow in a loud room, and tinnitus is ever present - there is no such thing as "absolute quiet".

Cheers

C>

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderators

I'm sure this is a common problem, but I'm curious what HCBF's take is on this.


I'm in a five piece band: two guitards, one lead vocal/guitard, drums and bass (me). Okay, just right there you accumulate some volume, naturally, but am I asking too much for everybody to turn down their instruments to a reasonable level so that I don't have to stick plugs in my ears? BTW, the lead guitard plugs his ears, too, and complains about volume levels as well.


It's difficult, as you know, to hear all the nuances and dynamics of the sound when you have your ears stuffed with plastic or foam. And I personally think that rehearsal is the best time to work on the band's sound - the dynamics, and everything that goes with it.


Am I just getting old, or do I have a case? How should I handle this? I've already brought up the volume issue at least
three
times to no avail... These are good musicians, just LOUD! They "need the tone," which means volume.
:confused::mad:
I appreciate any suggestions or anecdotes.


Cheers!

 

In my experience, yes, it is asking too much.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Definitely wear earplugs... ER-20s are really good for what they cost (~10$) - they barely change the sound at all, and I'd rather keep my hearing than hear every single nuance of the snare and cymbals (out drummer hits HARD!). Funnily, the band that I really needed to use earplugs with was an electric string quartet with a "rock" backing section - drums, bass, guitar, keyboard. I thought it would be nice to play with classically trained musicians, expecting that they would be all about phrasing, dynamics, etc., that you don't often see in rock. It was exactly the other way round - the 2 violin players always turned their amps to 11, the viola player could never hit the correct note... the cello player was awesome, played in a very precise and musical way, and was therefore barely heard under the violins' constant screeching... all in all, my earplugs saved my sanity :lol:

 

It was an interesting experience, but I didn't regret it at all when our roads parted :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

AAAAAAAAAAALWAYS wear my earplugs.

 

I got the Etymotics Baby Blues. They're not deafening earplugs, they're just a gentle reduction, even across the frequency range, and very comfy. I keep em in all practice and all night at the gigs.

 

I want a loooong, healthy musical career.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...