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Active versus Passive following Adam Nitti


basste

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I found this atricle in Bass musician magazine, and find his view about this point very instructive. Here is some extract. Whole article is in february/march mag; and very interresting to read...

 

ACTIVE VERSUS PASSIVE

This can be a source of friendly debate among bass players as to how to get the best tones. Which are better? ...basses that use active electronics or passive electronics?

Most basses that are active utilize some sort of onboard preamp, which allows you to cut or boost low, midrange, and high frequencies. With the tone controls set at center detent, theoretically the instrument is set flat. But in many cases, even with the tone controls set flat, an active instrument is going to have a louder output than a passive one.

A passive bass doesn

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Good info.

 

I haven't recorded anything in a while, but when I did and used active basses I always went w/ my tone controls flat. I only favored/blended the pickups to achieve the tone I wanted.

 

It didn't "sound" right to my ears straight through the headphones/monitor at the time, but once you bumped the bass and EQ'd it properly at the board/console, it was right there.

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Adam Nitti rawks.
:thu:

I'm just sayin'...

 

I finally caught an Adam Nitti bass clinic with Fran da man last year. I liked the clinic ok but wish it was just Adam.

 

He is an innovator for sure.

 

I just popped an audere preamp into my passive US Joe Osbourne and like it in a band live context. I like being able to vary the pickup impedence with a easy install Audere Preamp.

 

I only recorded passive bass in past and never had an active one. I just got a Skyline 44-01 that is actiive but a passive selector. I always play active live.

 

Live I play passive on recordings, but never a Pro recording.

 

I also like bottom end in my sound more so than mids so Iwould be on Adams side in this opinion.

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I think if you have an active bass with passive pickups, if you switch off the active preamp, you play a passive bass ?

But this point must not be valid for an active bass with active pickups like EMG; that you can't play without battery.

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Active basses with a true passive swith are vanishing from the shelves.

Actually I can't think of one on the current market.

I fully agree with Adam Nitti. When your bass starts sounding like a grand piano you take the grand piano's room.

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Active basses with a true passive swith are vanishing from the shelves.

Actually I can't think of one on the current market.

I fully agree with Adam Nitti. When your bass starts sounding like a grand piano you take the grand piano's room.

 

 

G&L?

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That is the problem (if it's a problem, lol) with my Tune TWB53. The notes ring like a grand piano! But that's as much a factor of the wood itself and the strings as the electronics in that case of that particular instrument. I've played others of that exact same instrument that don't sound like that.

 

Nonetheless, it means that it's a specialty instrument - you kinda have to write specifically for it, it does not sit in a standard song mix well.

 

Active basses with a true passive swith are vanishing from the shelves.

Actually I can't think of one on the current market.

I fully agree with Adam Nitti. When your bass starts sounding like a grand piano you take the grand piano's room.

 

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Active basses with a true passive swith are vanishing from the shelves.

Actually I can't think of one on the current market.

I fully agree with Adam Nitti. When your bass starts sounding like a grand piano you take the grand piano's room.

 

 

Not sure what you mean by 'true passive'...I always took it to mean that the active electronics are bypassed but the vol and tone pots remain in the circuit...

 

when the passive switch on my Lakland 4402 is engaged, the vol and blend pots function, but the 'tone controls' (ie the 3 band active eq) are bypassed.

 

So you've got the pups full on without any tone attenuation but you can rotate the blend pot to pan from full neck to full bridge. Of coure, the vol. pot controls the output level.

 

I haven't done much recording with it so this article will be something I'll consider when that time comes...

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I do believe that the vast majority of pickups are passive. I think EMG is or was the first to actually produce and active pickups.

 

All my pickups are passive, in my Joe Osbourne, P/J MIM fretless, and my Lakland Skyline.

 

I have Bartoni soapbars (love by the way) and a Bartlini MK1 preamp in my 44-01. The reason I bought this bass with a maple fretboard was to get a nice modern slap sound. I set the preamps to detent (middle way). I only boost a bit here and there. It is quiter volume wise without the active eq engaged.

 

I have passive Lindy Fralins that were stock in my MIA Joe Osbourne Jazz. I bought an Audere preamp and have played it in a band context. I lOVE IT. It also has three Z Modes (Hi Z, Med Z, and Low Z) that boost your pickup output (they claim to be the only people doing that). I got this configuration below. It does a wonderful job of passive mode. Live in a band, Low Z can take me into Fat Motown sound, Mid Z a bit more forward Mid range, and High Z being almost overdriven. I end up using Low Z most. It fattens up a Jazz bass tone quickly and easily with a flip swithc. Leave the preamp on Detent mostly too.

 

Z-mode Jazz Pre - Vol, Mid/Bal, Tre/Bass (JZ3-VB-3B)

 

3 Bands of Tone Control.

Volume, Mid/Balance stack, Treble/Bass stack, Output Jack.

 

Price: $149.00

 

I have Passive pickups in my Fretless. I want to upgrade to passive bartonilins. Might get a similar preamp but I want the passive/active switch..

 

I have done self recording only with the Lakland 44-01 and went passive mode. I did that too becuase I have GearBox which is an effects patch. I loved the tone. I also recorded the passive fretless and used a Ampeg old schol head with 15 model to get Fat fretless lines.

 

So, that is my hobby/diy recording experience.

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For that to work, you have to have stacked tone pots. The potentiometer in an active circuit is of a different value than in a passive circuit. Essentially, you're creating two completely independent circuits - one active and one passive.

 

Trully passive means the bass will still work fine without batteries.

G&Ls indeed fall into this category.

These days most active-passive switches just turn off the EQ.

 

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Originally Posted by Jazz Ad

Trully passive means the bass will still work fine without batteries.

G&Ls indeed fall into this category.

These days most active-passive switches just turn off the EQ.

 

 

So I checked and the Lakland 44-02 is not true passive as it requires a 9v to produce any sound in the 'passive' mode.

 

Thanks for straightening me out on that, Jazzy...

 

Now I'm curious as to the signal path in passive mode. Why wouldn't the input of the active eq section on the board just go directly to the output jack when the guitar is switched to passive?

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