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OHMS question (again)!


dert_stylus

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I know this question has been asked about a thousand and one times , so here I go again.

 

If my amp has two speaker outs with minimum impedance of 4 ohms, and I attached to 4 ohms speaker cabs , one to each output, will I be ok or do the 2 Four ohms cabs make it 2 ohms?

 

Thanks for any help you can provide!!

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1/4 + 1/4 = 1/2

 

So yeah, you'd be putting a 2 ohm load on your amp, possibly making it go boom.

 

Here's advice I wish I had been given earlier in my career: Unless you are POSITIVE it is going to be a standalone cabinet (an 8x10 for example), get 8ohm cabinets.

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You can hook up a 4 ohm cab to both outputs at the same time since they are not connected internally, as in a bridged application. What you cannot do is run two 4 ohm cabs off one output, unless the cabs were hooked up in series which would make the impedence additive, 4 + 4 = 8 ohms. Most most cabs don't have a provision for that & are wired in a way that when they are connected together they are in parrallel which in the case of two 4 ohm cabs the impedence would be halved & = to 2 ohms, too little for your amp. Here is a link to a very informative site http://www.bcae1.com/spkrmlti.htm

 

I'm sure it will all be clear once you pay this site a visit.:thu:

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concept

 

You have a hose that has a kink in it that causes less water to flow. If you put a Y valve before the kink and add a second hose with the same size kink, more water can flow out of both than just one. The kinks are your load measured in ohms, the water flow is the electrical current. The problem is the faucet (amp output stage) can only flow so much before it burns up from working with too much flow.

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You
can
hook up a 4 ohm cab to both outputs at the same time since they are not connected internally, as in a bridged application. What you cannot do is run two 4 ohm cabs off one output, unless the cabs were hooked up in series which would make the impedence additive, 4 + 4 = 8 ohms. Most most cabs don't have a provision for that & are wired in a way that when they are connected together they are in parrallel which in the case of two 4 ohm cabs the impedence would be halved & = to 2 ohms, too little for your amp. Here is a link to a very informative site
http://www.bcae1.com/spkrmlti.htm


I'm sure it will all be clear once you pay this site a visit.
:thu:

 

You need to be very careful in your wording here - if the OP's amplifier is mono (as most bass amps are), then both the outputs are internally connected in parallel. In the OP's case, he can connect 1 x 8 ohm cab to each of the 2 outputs, or daisy chains 2 x 8 ohm cabs off one output, presenting a 4 ohm load total to the amp (it's rated minimum).

 

If the OP connects a 4 ohm cab to each output, or daisy chains 2 x 4 ohm cabs off one output, he will be presenting a 2 ohm total load to the amp, which is less than the rated minimum, and will not be good for the amp.

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