Jump to content

Why an upright bass


LiveMusic

Recommended Posts

  • Members

I am a singer-songwriter and in the past, a good lineup is me on rhythm acoustic guitar, a lead acoustic guitar player and someone on electric bass. However, in general, I do like the sound of an upright bass, it sounds kinda cool. It does seem to fit the nature of that trio lineup.

 

What benefits of upright bass can you share?

 

Also, hauling an upright around, that seems problematic. I have a truck with a cab but if we put everything else in the cab, the bass would need to go in the bed. Are the cases weatherproof? I've never really thought about how people haul these things around. Do you need to baby them or are the cases really protective?

 

I am considering putting out the word for an upright bass player and try it out. My song genres are folk, country, country-blues, Americana.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

well they give the music that whole old authentic feel. basically as is mostly the case with music, it just gives it a certain vibe and look! a nice compromise is getting an electric stick bass. they are played like a proper double bass but are solid, a load slimmer and lighter and you don't have to faf around with extra pick-ups or mics-you can just plug in and play! if you do take this route, make sure the player has one with a decent length. as some of them are shorter to be more travel friendly the also have a tendency to sound like a fretless bass guitar, rather than a double bass.

 

with cases it depends on what you get-some are more hardwearing than others. if its for a double bass though, if its at all hardwearing, it'll also weigh a bloody tonne!

 

acoustic bass guitars is also an option! good luck!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

I am considering putting out the word for an upright bass player and try it out. My song genres are folk, country, country-blues, Americana.

 

 

Give it a go, and see what you find. Worst thing that would happen is you find out you would rather have an electric player instead.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

They're mostly about the image. Sorry but that's how I see it. Acoustics are their own thing in feel and tone but those are minute compared to the business of baing them around safely.

 

I agree. I can make my electric sound "close enough" to an upright that it doesn't much matter, IMO.

 

You also have the "Jazz Snobs" that will laugh you off the stage if you show up with an electric bass.

 

You can do things with an upright that you can't with an electric. But the reverse is true as well. Neither one is better... they're just different. And the whole "tone" argument is subjective.

 

The one thing that really does bother me, is that Jazz wasn't always played with electric guitars and electric keyboards. It's hypocritical for a Jazz snob to refuse to acknowledge an electric bass guitar.

 

 

That said... it seems people want that image more so than they want a good live band. I've seen a number of bands go from electric to upright. One in particular was a Honky Tonk band. They were probably my favorite local band at one point. They had great musicians, great western outfits, and great energy. Their (electric) bassist left. They replaced him with a very good upright player that musically leans towards Jazz (not Country), he has no onstage energy, and last two times I saw them he was wearing a polo shirt tucked into relaxed fit jeans, and a pair of Nike trainers... and no cowboy hat. He distracts the entire rest of the band because he looks like he doesn't belong.

 

Why would they do this to themselves? Cause they wanted an upright. :idk: To each their own. All I know is, I won't go watch them anymore. They're boring to watch now. And I've seen this happen in more than one band.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

If you play finger style pizz on an upright then you can get a decent replica of the sound from an electric bass.

If you play slap on upright you dont have a hope.

I agree with TAS, too.. they are a lot about image.

But if you honeslty think your music isnt about image, you are sadly mistaken.

 

Oh, yeah.. and you can climb on them:thu:

l_1ff15f7add9fa336f713ec48246f7494.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

If you play slap on upright you dont have a hope.

 

It's not difficult to replicate URB slap on an electric. It doesn't sound exactly like it, but URB slap (IMO) is more about adding more percussive feel to the rhythm.

 

But if you honeslty think your music isnt about image, you are sadly mistaken.

 

+1. But the right image can be attained without a URB. And a URB can also destroy your image. It's all about the player... not what s/he is playing.

 

Oh, yeah.. and you can climb on them:thu:

 

Yeah... and I can't imagine how long it would take me to be proficient enough to play half-way decent while climbing on it. :eek:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

It's not difficult to replicate URB slap on an electric. It doesn't sound exactly like it, but URB slap (IMO) is more about adding more percussive feel to the rhythm.

 

I would be very interested to hear any sound bites you have to support this and an explanation as to how it is done.

Ive spent 20 years thinking about it and failed miserably.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

IMO an upright is an entirely different instrument.To a point you can mimic some of the sounds/techniques on an electric but you'll never really nail it.Their size is a drawback as is keeping the humidity under control with solid wood versions but nothing is perfect.So long as you have a way of dealing with the issues they come with they're well worth the extra effort.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...