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Fretboard oil?


filterthing

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My brother and I use the Dunlop system twice a year on our instruments.

 

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Quite simple, really. 3/4" blue painter's masking tape, steel wool, razor blade, sometimes a toothbrush helps.

 

Unstring the bass. Get it on a nice level surface. We went and bought that rollup guitar mat, and a folding table just for this work.

 

Use the tape to cover up the fretboard. Get the edge of the tape as close to the fret as you can, and wrap it over the edge. Isolate all the frets. Use more tape and some newspaper/paper towel/napkins/towel/handkerchief/whatever, to cover the body and, most importantly, the pickups so the magnets don't attract the steel wool dust. Run two long strips of tape to cover and protect the sides of the fretboard.

 

Now start buffing the frets with the steel wool. This will get rid of all corrosion and grime, and get them shiny clean. Shop-Vac up the steel wool dust, remove all the tape.

 

Use the 01 bottle to dissolve and remove all the gunk and buildup. Use the toothbrush to push/stab the bristles into the wood grain to work out the trapped gunk. Once you get it soaked for a fwe minutes, wipe and rub off all the residue.

 

Now start using the 02 bottle to oil the fretboard. Keep adding coats until the oil no longer soaks into the wood. Then you'll know the fretboard is saturated, when you see it standing in little puddles on your fretboard. Rub the remainder vigorously into the wood, and wipe away the excess.

 

Restring, good to go.

 

Depending on how often you change strings, you should plan your cleaning process along with string changes. My brother changes strings every 3-4 months or so on his most-played guitars, so he tries to do it all up every other time he restrings. I do it every time I change my bass strings because I don't change em often. It IS possible to simply unstring your bass and put the same strings back on afterward. Done this as well, no problems.

 

 

 

EDIT: His photos-full tutorial on fretboard care:

 

http://www.sevenstring.org/forum/the-sevenstring-org-workbench/8862-tech-how-to-fretboard-care.html

 

DOUBLE-EDIT: Most people will mention lemon oil as an alternative to this Dunlop stuff. Avoid lemon oil because it is quite acidic. Use regular or boiled linseed oil. Stays in the wood longer and much more neutral to your own body's hand oils and ph levels.

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Dunlop deep fretboard conditioner. A little bit once or twise a year. Avoid lemmon oil. Reason being that once you start useing it, wood will dry out faster. Then you gotta use it more and more. Is like armourall for car interiors in that regard, looks great at first then soon starts being its own worse ememy.

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Dunlop deep fretboard conditioner. A little bit once or twise a year. Avoid lemmon oil. Reason being that once you start useing it, wood will dry out faster. Then you gotta use it more and more. Is like armourall for car interiors in that regard, looks great at first then soon starts being its own worse ememy.

 

 

i was not aware of this, does this apply to ebony as well? all i've used for years is lemon oil on my ebony fretboard and just acquired a bass with rosewood.

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Lemon oil that is available at most stores is loaded with low molecular weight hydrocarbons that will accelerate drying the wood out.

 

If you can get a hold of some real lemon oil, that's the ticket.

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tried the old search on this one, got some odd results... anyway, got any recommendations for rosewood fretboard care? I noticed mine is starting to look a little dry.


thanks

 

 

I have used boiled linseed oil for years. It's cheap, you can get it from any hardware store and you get great results.

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