Jump to content

Are Warwick basses versatile?


Mark L

Recommended Posts

  • Members

Or should they only be considered for rock? :confused:

 

I do a bit of everything, you see, and am after a new bass for my studio. I really like the look of Warwicks, but are they a 'bass for all seasons'?

 

Cheers,

 

Nads :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

They have a distinctive sound.


What bass(es) have you got at the moment?

 

 

Distinctive in what way?

 

I have a Schecter Diamond Stiletto at the moment. It's okay but I want something with a bit more OOOMPH!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

I think "oomph" probably covers it. Their sound is often described as growly. My 5-string fretless has the same sound.


So not much in the way of versatility (referring to your "all seasons" remark), but a good sound nonetheless.

 

 

I like growly basses

 

How about an active? That would give me some tonal options, surely?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members


How about an active? That would give me some tonal options, surely?

 

Most active basses have passive pick ups and a built in pre amp , so theoretically you can get the same versatility out of a passive bass and your studio console . Actually probably more versatility from the console then an on board pre amp...

If you want more "oomph" sounds like you want a P...or better still a P/J.

But all you really need is an Aria Pro II ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

To me, Warwicks are a one trick pony - although they do that one trick very well... If you can get around their egonomics and price vs what they offer - I can't - then they can be pretty good in the right situation... versatile, they are not... YMMV,

 

 

 

- georgestrings

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Most active basses have passive pick ups and a built in pre amp , so theoretically you can get the same versatility out of a passive bass and your studio console . Actually probably more versatility from the console then an on board pre amp...

If you want more "oomph" sounds like you want a P...or better still a P/J.

But all you really need is an Aria Pro II
;)

 

I used to be in a band where the bassist actually did have an Aria Pro II :thu:

 

Ah, the memories.......

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Warwicks are plenty versatile, anyone who says differently hasn't spent any quality time with one. They have the capability of being very growly and aggressive but if they have a preamp you can do whatever you want. They always sound like a Warwick but that doesn't speak to their versatility.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Or should they only be considered for rock?
:confused:

I do a bit of everything, you see, and am after a new bass for my studio. I really like the look of Warwicks, but are they a 'bass for all seasons'?


Cheers,


Nads
:)

 

I saw the Ohio Players last year, their bassist was playing a Corvette Standard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

I owned a Corvette Standard 4 (passive) and it was a great recording bass.

Great live too. Played jazz/rock/funk at the time and that bass really held it's own. Two jazz pickups...not sure if they were noiseless, stacked or split? Wish I still owned it, but it started developing neck issues. (wenge)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Though versartiloe as far as tone changing between pups and degree of blend between em and how you adjust the bass and treble control. Is still gonna be limited by the pups basic sound and how thats tweaked by body and neck woods. Very good basses overall though a bit pricey. Not as versatile as basses with 3 band eq and wont do the humbucker sound as well as humbucker equipted basses since it of course has J pups non most models. Warwicks are pretty much useable for any kind of music, but will remain limited by pups just like any bass is. If humbucker or P pups are better suited to your voice desired then you need a bass with those instead.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

Warwicks are plenty versatile, anyone who says differently hasn't spent any quality time with one. They have the capability of being very growly and aggressive but if they have a preamp you can do whatever you want. They always sound like a Warwick but that doesn't speak to their versatility.

 

Yup.

 

I use mine for Jazz, Funk, Hard Rock, Dub, and Blues... And it never seems out of place. I have a thumb, which is one of the more distinct sounding models.

 

The only time it's out of place is visually. I get looks using it for blues for example. Close your eyes and it works well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Warwicks can be eq'd from dry to meaty.

To me it again depends more on who is playing and how. Last night I saw "The Stratpack" on TV. Gary Moore, Paul Rodgers, David Gilmour, Joe Walsh and others... even Ron Wood (on an accoustic Gibson !) and all the time there was Pino Paladino dressed in a P-bass.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...