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Bass in a Band or recording...


Marko

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We are all our own worst critic. There are tracks on the last album I recorded that I think sound terrible...but every other musician that has listened to it says it sounds fine and they don't hear what I hear.

 

As for guitarists playing bass better than you, keep in mind that most guitarists play bass like they play guitar and this is NOT what playing bass is about. Sure they can run all over the fretboard, but can they sit in the pocket and just groove? Do they have the sense of rhythm necessary to hold the whole band together? Most guitarists I know that "play" bass can't do that...they don't have what it takes to be a great bass player...they just know how to show off on bass.

 

Don't for a minute think that just because they can play better than you means they are a better bass player than you are or can be. :thu:

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We are all our own worst critic. There are tracks on the last album I recorded that I think sound terrible...but every other musician that has listened to it says it sounds fine and they don't hear what I hear.


As for guitarists playing bass better than you, keep in mind that most guitarists play bass like they play guitar and this is NOT what playing bass is about. Sure they can run all over the fretboard, but can they sit in the pocket and just groove? Do they have the sense of rhythm necessary to hold the whole band together? Most guitarists I know that "play" bass can't do that...they don't have what it takes to be a great bass player...they just know how to show off on bass.


Don't for a minute think that just because they can play better than you means they are a better bass player than you are or can be.
:thu:

 

Aside from that, music isn't about "better." This is something, being a late-comer, I have to deal with on a regular basis - I run into 15 year old kids at guitar center who are more technically proficient than I am. Music is art, and technical proficiency does not equate to artistic superiority or "feel." It's more about what you get out of the act than what other people get.

 

I know lots of guitarists with better rhythm and technical proficiency than me on bass - but there're millions of bass players better than me, too. Doesn't matter to me - I'm good enough for my situation and constantly improving, and most importantly I get a lot out of the experience.

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Aside from that, music isn't about "better." This is something, being a late-comer, I have to deal with on a regular basis - I run into 15 year old kids at guitar center who are more technically proficient than I am. Music is art, and technical proficiency does not equate to artistic superiority or "feel." It's more about what you get out of the act than what other people get.


I know lots of guitarists with better rhythm and technical proficiency than me on bass - but there're millions of bass players better than me, too. Doesn't matter to me - I'm good enough for my situation and constantly improving, and most importantly I get a lot out of the experience.

 

Agreed!! :cool:

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Well, I wouldn't beat myself up about it too badly if I were you. Your first track is almost never going to sound good and yes, you'll certainly have to retake track after track after track. Even if you know the song by heart and have played it for the last 3 years. It's just the way it is in a studio. I didn't even start recording until I was happy with the tone that was being recorded. Also the things we did with the EQ was something I would never have chosen for a live setting, but it was what was right for the track. We also don't EQ the instrument by itself, we EQ and set the levels for the instrument with everything else. We got a basic natural tone I was happy with and then tweaked as necessary when everything was done.

 

now unless you're recording with analog with very limited track space, you should be able to record a second little part right where your bum note was on a separate track and either replace it digitally or take the volume of the bum note out and boost the volume of the second tracked good note up as a replacement. So I wouldn't worry about buying a bunch more stuff for your bass rig, your recorder should have everything necessary to fix the problem.

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Why can't you just retrack that single note and play it differently? That's what I would do.

 

+1

 

Should be easy to just drop in another attempt at that section. I know I've had to (embarrassingly, sometimes more than just once :facepalm:)

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+1


Should be easy to just drop in another attempt at that section. I know I've had to (embarrassingly, sometimes more than just once
:facepalm:
)

 

There have been times in the past where there literally was a single note in a passage that didn't sound right and I did just that one note, over and over again until it sounded right.

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There have been times in the past where there literally was a single note in a passage that didn't sound right and I did just that one note, over and over again until it sounded right.

 

I guess the number of tries you get depends on who's picking up the tab for the recording ;)

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