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Latin Bass?


Dr. Strangelove

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Get some books on latin drumming. If you understand how the percussion works it will help you figure out where you will sit in the music.

 

Pick up anything with Cachao. The Master Sessions CD's are excellent.

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Anyone here plays latin music?

I'm starting with The Latin Bass Book as I type.
:thu:

 

 

I assume you're refering to THE Latin Bass Book...

 

510KDDX3CNL._SL500_AA240_.jpg

 

I'm working in that book right now myself...

 

For me, latin bass style is the ultimate in bass playing...

 

if you haven't seen this vid, do yourself a favor and rent it...or just buy it because you will eventually anyway...

 

51S9FVYZHSL._SL500_AA240_.jpg

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Don't play real Latin, but it's just about my biggest influence as an overall style.
:thu:

Chill music most certainly would have those influences.:cool:

Latin Pop is one of my favorite genres. No outlet to play it, though.:cry:

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I play fairly regularly with a Latin band led by an Argentinean woman. It's all originals that she writes, so the songs aren't very traditional, but a lot of the basic latin feels and styles are represented in her music. She uses some of the Brazilian styles (bossa, samba), some more Cuban-ish stuff (mambo, bolero), and some specifically Argentinean stuff (baguala, zamba).

 

When I was trying to learn her music and get some of the basic feels down, I found this book helped a LOT:

http://www.jazzguitar.be/store/the-true-cuban-bass.php

 

It takes you through some of the styles in the order in which they evolved and you learn some history of the styles. It also talks about various claves and how to fit the bass tumbaos over them.

 

Highly recommended! :thu:

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I assume you're refering to THE Latin Bass Book...


510KDDX3CNL._SL500_AA240_.jpg

I'm working in that book right now myself...


For me, latin bass style is the ultimate in bass playing...


if you haven't seen this vid, do yourself a favor and rent it...or just buy it because you will eventually anyway...


51S9FVYZHSL._SL500_AA240_.jpg

 

Great Film !!!

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I play fairly regularly with a Latin band led by an Argentinean woman. It's all originals that she writes, so the songs aren't very traditional, but a lot of the basic latin feels and styles are represented in her music. She uses some of the Brazilian styles (bossa, samba), some more Cuban-ish stuff (mambo, bolero), and some specifically Argentinean stuff (baguala, zamba).


When I was trying to learn her music and get some of the basic feels down, I found this book helped a LOT:

http://www.jazzguitar.be/store/the-true-cuban-bass.php


It takes you through some of the styles in the order in which they evolved and you learn some history of the styles. It also talks about various claves and how to fit the bass tumbaos over them.


Highly recommended!
:thu:

 

- Endorsed by Jimmy Haslip, Chucho Valdes, and Paquito D'Rivera - :eek:

 

very impressive...thanks for the post

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I play quite a lot of Latin music in one of the bands I play in. It's not easy for many since the bass, in many instances, supply the groove and it's not played exactly on the beat. Learn the clave and listen to a lot of latin music.

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It's all about the clave.


Call and Response.

 

 

These are important points to me. I've always felt any serious musician on any instrument should get to know the clave and history behind it. Then implement the feel in their own music to give it proper depth.

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I really got into Latin jazz after hearing Arturo Sandoval. Not long ago, I picked up a Latin Giants of Jazz CD. These guys are great, its pretty much all former Tito Puente players and they really make the songs groove.

 

Quincy Jones' Big Band Bossa Nova is a great starting point for learning some of the style, and like a lot of Quincy's music is musical enough that even a non-jazzer can listen to it and like it.

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