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4x10 & 1x15 or 1x15 & 1x15?


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I have been using 2 1x15s for years. if you are happy with the sound of your 1x15, just get another.

I think if you a going to run more then one speaker it is best to keep them the same. A 4x10 will push more air and over power the 1x15, generally speaking. Speaker sensitivity plays a part though.

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Typically, an 18 is a better match for 4x10.

A 15 is better matched with 2x10, but it really depends on the particular amps/cabs.

I currently have a 450 watt 15, it can hang with a mid-level 4x10, but many 15s top out 200 250

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Sam I thought the idea behind 18's was to throw it way out back in large venues?Anyway a pair of good 15's would be my choice among those listed.

 

This is true. I would never buy an 18 for a bass cab.

I knew a guy years ago that had a full genzbenz rig with 18 and 4x10. He got it through an endorsement, or contest or something. It actually was a very nice rig, but soundguys hated it, understandably.

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ya know, one thing your poll is not mentioning is two 12 cabs. the above post made me think of the Genz Benz Neo 212XT. That is a pretty monsterous cabinet in it's own right.

 

I've looked into those, and they seem great. My only issue is cost, coupled with their shape. At $600 a piece, buying two at once is cost prohibitive for me. And I can't see a way to stack one with a fifteen, or 2x10, amp, that would be stable and pleasing to the eye.

 

And, if I am not mistaken, they only come in 4 ohms, so it either has to be your only cab or you'll need a 2 ohm stable amp.

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I agree with jonjohn. Unless you're planning on getting a crossover and biamping, having two different cabinets will result in a bump in response in the range where both cabinets are active, with dropoffs in other frequency bands. So, I'd say a second 1x15".

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I agree with jonjohn. Unless you're planning on getting a crossover and biamping, having two different cabinets will result in a bump in response in the range where both cabinets are active, with dropoffs in other frequency bands. So, I'd say a second 1x15".

 

Its not always true though. I just got done building my bassist a massive new rig with 1 cab being a 2x15 and the other being a 2x10+2x12 and they mix quite well.

 

Of course i also tuned all the individual chambers sorta close withe the 2x10 tuned higher than the 2x12 or 2x15's.

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I agree with jonjohn. Unless you're planning on getting a crossover and biamping, having two different cabinets will result in a bump in response in the range where both cabinets are active, with dropoffs in other frequency bands. So, I'd say a second 1x15".

 

Can you explain this dropoff in frequencies? Like, something I can relate it to in real life? Because I hear people talk about it all the time when speaking of mixing cabs....

 

Also to perry, PJB is too rich for my blood. And I have considered getting 2x12 (I know Avatar makes one), I should've added that to the pole. Anyone else have any insight as far as 2x12 and 1x15?

 

Thanks for all the replies, duders.

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I think it really depends on the brand/set up. The best sounding Markbass rig, IMO, is a head and a single ported 4 ohm 410 - for me I can't foresee an instance where I'll need anything more than that. However, that's what I like for my styles of music (where deep and low bass is required).

 

With My TC Electornic rig, I have a 210 (vertically stacked on the top) coupled with a 212 (bottom) and I like the sound. This flies in the face of the idea that all speakers in a rig should be the same size, but it works for me.

 

I think there is validity in the opinion that if you like the sound of your current speaker setup and you just want to move more air, then get more of the same.

 

(I've always thought a 215 would be awesome....:))

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Its not always true though. I just got done building my bassist a massive new rig with 1 cab being a 2x15 and the other being a 2x10+2x12 and they mix quite well.


Of course i also tuned all the individual chambers sorta close withe the 2x10 tuned higher than the 2x12 or 2x15's.

 

No, not always. Sometimes people get lucky, and sometimes they like the bumpy response.

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Can you explain this dropoff in frequencies? Like, something I can relate it to in real life? Because I hear people talk about it all the time when speaking of mixing cabs....


Also to perry, PJB is too rich for my blood. And I have considered getting 2x12 (I know Avatar makes one), I should've added that to the pole. Anyone else have any insight as far as 2x12 and 1x15?


Thanks for all the replies, duders.

 

Do you have an EQ? Or you could just use the tone controls on your amp. Set everything as flat as possible. Then boost one control. That will give you a bump in the response. Everything else is lower in comparison. That's all a drop off is, a region of lower volume in the frequency response.

 

It's true that a lot of people like a non-flat frequency response. That's what scooped mids is all about. But when you mix cabinets, the bumps and dips are controlled by the cabinets, not the tone controls. If you're lucky, you'll get a response that you like. But you may not. You may get a bump in a region that doesn't appeal to you, and you may not be able to EQ it out.

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Do you have an EQ? Or you could just use the tone controls on your amp. Set everything as flat as possible. Then boost one control. That will give you a bump in the response. Everything else is lower in comparison. That's all a drop off is, a region of lower volume in the frequency response.


It's true that a lot of people like a non-flat frequency response. That's what scooped mids is all about. But when you mix cabinets, the bumps and dips are controlled by the cabinets, not the tone controls. If you're lucky, you'll get a response that you like. But you may not. You may get a bump in a region that doesn't appeal to you, and you may not be able to EQ it out.

 

this man speaketh with sage advice.

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