Jump to content

Auditions - questions after making a final decision...


mstreck

Recommended Posts

  • Members

Once all of the auditions are over, and we make a final decision, how much do we tell the others that didn't make it? Do we give specific reasons why we didn't pick them? Do we tell them why we picked someone else? Do we try to keep them "in our back pocket" in case we need someone down the road? Do we just tell them "thanks, but no thanks"?

 

I could use a little guidance here. Thanks!

 

Mike

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 59
  • Created
  • Last Reply
  • Members

I've never started a band, but I have conducted interviews and hired people plenty of times.

 

You say "Thanks for coming out. You played great, but we decided to go with someone else. I know lots of other bands and I'll give them your name if they need someone. Best of luck to you."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

Thank you for coming out last night. I'm sorry to say we've decided to go with somebody else. We'll certainly keep you in mind if anything changes. Good luck in your search for a band.

 

 

sounds about right to me.....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Only the pyscho/insecure people will give you a hard time, ie "what did I do wrong?" or "what do I need to improve on?" I think what the other guys suggested is good... if they seemed like a cool person maybe add you will recommend them to another band if they are looking for a guitarist/bassist/drummer.

 

Only band I didn't "make the audition" didn't even call me. I called them after two weeks of not hearing from them. They were nowhere near gig ready, but I was really just looking for musicians to hang out with in the area since I had just moved to a new town.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

Thank you for coming out last night. I'm sorry to say we've decided to go with somebody else. We'll certainly keep you in mind if anything changes. Good luck in your search for a band.

 

 

This. If they press the issue just say you found someone that you thought was a better fit and leave it at that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Try and keep it as nice as possible because with musicians things can change overnight! The guy you have now may not be the guy you have in 3 months- When he starts moaning about playing all of that "pop crap" (it's happened to us) you may be calling #2 back.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

I've never started a band, but I have conducted interviews and hired people plenty of times.


You say "Thanks for coming out. You played great, but we decided to go with someone else. I know lots of other bands and I'll give them your name if they need someone. Best of luck to you."

 

 

I should add that you don't really give his name to other bands just in case you need him as a fall back or fill in.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

I should add that you don't really give his name to other bands just in case you need him as a fall back or fill in.

 

 

I don't agree with that. Bands around here help each other out all the time. Even if you don't give out the name, chances are that he'll find another band anyway.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

You really need to handle this in a straight up way. If the guy asks you why he didnt get the gig. Tell him, where you felt he came up short, dont nit pick be constructive..... After all the guy did spend the time to come out for the audition. He will go to other auditions. Out of respect give him some feedback so he can up his game on the next one. As for telling him you will give his name to other bands then not doing it... thats a chicken {censored} thing to do. Best just to say nothing or really follow through.

 

If you didnt hire him because of he was ugly , fat , or just didnt fit your image.... i would sidestep that one since it really is nothing he will be able to change.

 

Another thing to consider is that some guys will do things at an audition to make sure they dont get asked to take the gig.. its a way to not have to tell you they would not take the gig of offered.

 

Its a complex mating dance.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

If there are close candidates that just barely lost the gig to your eventual choice, MAYBE consider giving them a small bit of insight to that:

 

"The band does feel that we chose the right guy, but we were definitely looking at you as a strong contender. Knowing how everything is still a chance, would you mind if we kept in touch in case things don't work out with him down the road?"

 

Maybe not...could be awkward, but aside from the auditioning part, that's kind of exactly what happened in my current band:

 

Frontman I used to play with in another project was putting together a new venture, he asked me to play drums. I declined due to schedule/other band commitments/having a child. Door was left open because we've kept on good terms. He got a drummer who was questionable. Asked me again a few months later. I still had to decline for the same reasons. Dorr still left open in case things changed down the road...

Several months later, my then band was shutting down, so I dropped him a note and said "Hey, we're calling this one done. If you are still not solid with the guy you have drumming now, let's talk." He responded back to let me know that the drummer they had was actually working out well, but 'let's keep in touch in case things change down the road." I responded with an 'Ok' and resigned myself to looking through Craigslist...

The NEXT DAY, he sent me an email saying to strike the previous note: that night at practice, the drummer quit, and the rest is history...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

If there are close candidates that just barely lost the gig to your eventual choice, MAYBE consider giving them a small bit of insight to that:


"The band does feel that we chose the right guy, but we were definitely looking at you as a strong contender. Knowing how everything is still a chance, would you mind if we kept in touch in case things don't work out with him down the road?"


Maybe not...could be awkward, but aside from the auditioning part, that's kind of exactly what happened in my current band:


Frontman I used to play with in another project was putting together a new venture, he asked me to play drums. I declined due to schedule/other band commitments/having a child. Door was left open because we've kept on good terms. He got a drummer who was questionable. Asked me again a few months later. I still had to decline for the same reasons. Dorr still left open in case things changed down the road...

Several months later, my then band was shutting down, so I dropped him a note and said "Hey, we're calling this one done. If you are still not solid with the guy you have drumming now, let's talk." He responded back to let me know that the drummer they had was actually working out well, but 'let's keep in touch in case things change down the road." I responded with an 'Ok' and resigned myself to looking through Craigslist...

The NEXT DAY, he sent me an email saying to strike the previous note: that night at practice, the drummer quit, and the rest is history...

 

 

 

Never burn bridges. A guy you cut on an audition , might be a whole lot better in a year. Things move pretty fast in rock and roll bands, especially with young people. I didnt make an audition as a kid. I was playing in a band with some of the guys who cut me a year later. A year after that none of those guys in that band would never had been able to make the cut in the band i was playing with after that band broke up. Just food for thought.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Thanks for the help. I think our responses will probably depend on why we cut that particular person in the first place.

 

We look for "fit" first. You need to be on board with what we do and not want to change it (help us build on it, yes - but not change it). If you don't fit the philosophy, you're out. Then we look at chops. Out of everyone that "fits", the best player will have the right of first refusal.

 

The great player that *refused* to play at least two songs on our setlist isn't someone that I'd want in my band to begin with, much less want to recommend to other bands. He'll get a polite "we decided to go with someone else". Same for the guys that didn't have the chops.

 

The rest will get "it was a difficult choice. We will definitely contact you if anything changes and be happy to recommend you to other bands".

 

I think I'm going to start compiling a database of musicians that we audition and have it ready in case we (or other bands) need it. (Thanks to Stratotastic for the idea!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

The great player that *refused* to play at least two songs on our setlist isn't someone that I'd want in my band to begin with

 

 

At an audition that is a BIG sign of things to come.

 

A few years back we were auditioning guitar players and we actually had a guitar player who emailed us a list of 20+ songs we WILL be playing when he joins us and the rest of the show can be what we "used to do."

 

... he never got the audition.

 

Glad to hear things are on their way with your band again!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

Thanks for the help. I think our responses will probably depend on why we cut that particular person in the first place.


We look for "fit" first. You need to be on board with what we do and not want to change it (help us build on it, yes - but not change it). If you don't fit the philosophy, you're out. Then we look at chops. Out of everyone that "fits", the best player will have the right of first refusal.


The great player that *refused* to play at least two songs on our setlist isn't someone that I'd want in my band to begin with, much less want to recommend to other bands. He'll get a polite "we decided to go with someone else". Same for the guys that didn't have the chops.


The rest will get "it was a difficult choice. We will definitely contact you if anything changes and be happy to recommend you to other bands".


I think I'm going to start compiling a database of musicians that we audition and have it ready in case we (or other bands) need it. (Thanks to Stratotastic for the idea!)

 

 

 

 

Be fully aware of the fact that there is such a thing as the passive agressive approach where in reality a guy is turning you down ,, even though it seems to the band like they are turning them down. guys can be pretty tricky like that. They see somthing they dont like about a band ,, tis way easier to just make sure you dont get asked rather than just tell you wants wrong with your band. dont assume that everyone that walks through the door really is hell bent on getting in your band. They may just want to check you out. Its alot easier for them to sack themselves than tell you why they dont want to play with your band. its a way to get out the door , with out comming off like an asshole. Its a tricky process. They know they can ace the next audition if they want to. A guy like that can also hang around a little to see what develops ,, and just bail on you when their predicitons start to come true before their eyes. They have your band on probation and you dont know it. You think you just landed this great player ,, and poof they are down the road. Lots of guys roll though alot of bands when they are on the hunt. So the give it a try deal is not uncommon. Its was said by someone in here , that dont start booking too early ,, because these are just the kind of guys who will hang you out to dry if they think you are not ready for prime time. Practice is one thing with a band that isnt up to their standards,,, hitting the stage is another. Just somthing to think about as you try to put the band back together.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

At an audition that is a BIG sign of things to come.

 

 

Yeah... my first thought was "WTF?" It was also at that very moment that I found myself being super-critical of everything that he played/did from that point forward, but I restrained myself from saying anything. Turns out that the others thought the same thing.

 

I have high hopes for our next audition. He and I talked quite a bit on the phone last week and seemed to click pretty well. He's a super-nice guy and I hear he is super-talented as well. I'm crossing my fingers that he's our guy.

 

More so, I'm really hoping that we don't need to settle for someone who isn't a good fit, because we'll get nowhere fast.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Be fully aware of the fact that there is such a thing as the passive agressive approach where in reality a guy is turning you down ,, even though it seems to the band like they are turning them down. guys can be pretty tricky like that. They see somthing they dont like about a band ,, tis way easier to just make sure you dont get asked rather than just tell you wants wrong with your band. dont assume that everyone that walks through the door really is hell bent on getting in your band. They may just want to check you out. Its alot easier for them to sack themselves than tell you why they dont want to play with your band. its a way to get out the door , with out comming off like an asshole. Its a tricky process. They know they can ace the next audition if they want to. A guy like that can also hang around a little to see what develops ,, and just bail on you when their predicitons start to come true before their eyes. They have your band on probation and you dont know it. You think you just landed this great player ,, and poof they are down the road. Lots of guys roll though alot of bands when they are on the hunt. So the give it a try deal is not uncommon. Its was said by someone in here , that dont start booking too early ,, because these are just the kind of guys who will hang you out to dry if they think you are not ready for prime time. Practice is one thing with a band that isnt up to their standards,,, hitting the stage is another. Just somthing to think about as you try to put the band back together.

 

I might think that this could be what happened, but he mentioned one of those songs when we were first talking on the phone and said we should do XXXXX by the same band instead. I thought he was kidding.

 

He was really into trying anything else on the list - even some of the stupid poppy stuff. He only refused on those two songs. And it probably wouldn't have been a big deal except that those two songs always get a great crowd reaction when we do it, so we're not dropping them. :cop:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

Yeah... my first thought was "WTF?" It was also at that very moment that I found myself being super-critical of everything that he played/did from that point forward, but I restrained myself from saying anything. Turns out that the others thought the same thing.


I have high hopes for our next audition. He and I talked quite a bit on the phone last week and seemed to click pretty well. He's a super-nice guy and I hear he is super-talented as well. I'm crossing my fingers that he's our guy.


More so, I'm really hoping that we don't need to settle for someone who isn't a good fit, because we'll get nowhere fast.

 

 

 

 

Mike ,, your band has one major deal that will make guys take a wait and see approach. You have a member that dates your singer. lots of guys will hang around and see how that really works when things get to the point where everyone goes back to their normal behavior. in the audition dance ,, everyone is always all positive , cheery and happy. a month or two into the process you get to see what the band is really like. i know i am comming out with alot of negative vibes. Part of that may be cause i am all stressed up today ,, I got to hit the road for a 1600 mile road trip back to michigan ,,,, god I hate this day ... clean , pack , wait , delay ,, and drive , and drive and drive. 2 and a half days on the road. Just thought i would explain why I am in bummer mode .. but i do think i made some points that go along with the audition process. I just got done with a couple year process of joining and trading up on bands.....till I found some keepers. I know how to get asked to join , i know how to slip out the door ,, and i know how to load out.. and i know how to keep my seat. I also know how to do it without burning the bridge.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

When we auditioned replacement bass players last year we did not select the best bassist that auditioned. We asked the one who was quite good, and felt like he would fit right in, if he would like to join the band. Now, over a year later, he has been rock solid and we are drama free and gigging more and more. The right fit is everything (almost).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Never burn bridges. A guy you cut on an audition , might be a whole lot better in a year. Things move pretty fast in rock and roll bands, especially with young people. I didnt make an audition as a kid. I was playing in a band with some of the guys who cut me a year later. A year after that none of those guys in that band would never had been able to make the cut in the band i was playing with after that band broke up. Just food for thought.

 

My old band was auditioning guitar players. We cut a guy. It was mostly personality issue between him and our other guitar player (and they worked at the same place). I agreed to be the heavy so things would not be uncomfortable in the work place for our guitarist. I don't really even remember what I told the guy...something about preparedness, style.:blah::blah::blah: but the guy denied everything and came off really pissed!!

 

Anyway about a year later it was my turn to look for a band. I went to an audition set up by a guitarist that was trying to put a band together and lo and behold, who was it? The guy I had cut the year before. I hadn't put two and two together before the audition and didn't know before I showed up. But he didn't remember me either until I brought it up later when we were talking and he said, "I thought I sort of recognized you from somewhere" Luckily we ended up having a laugh about the irony of the situation and everything was cool. (the project never got off the ground though).

 

Moral of the story is ....I agree with the post above: NEVER burn your bridges unless you are absolutely convinced you could not, would not EVER play in a project with that individual. (But what if later he's in a great band that you really want to be part of)? You've got to keep the Karma as cool as possible IMO.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Focus on some little quirk they have. Like:

 

Hey, man. Look, we really thought you were good, but your stance is weird. That, and your left eye is kind of lazy. We all talked it over and don't think we could be in a band with a guy who has a lazy eye and a weird stance. And your girlfriend is ugly, so three strikes, man. Nothing personal, just makin' sure we have the right pieces.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

When we auditioned replacement bass players last year we did not select the best bassist that auditioned. We asked the one who was quite good, and felt like he would fit right in, if he would like to join the band. Now, over a year later, he has been rock solid and we are drama free and gigging more and more. The right fit is everything (almost).

 

+1

 

We were looking for a replacement keys player 6 months ago...we couldn't find a fit. We decided to audition a second guitarist. Several had extraordinary chops but seemed like poor fits for a number of reasons (personality, availability, geography, look, etc) The guy we chose was very good too...but felt like a much better fit personality-wise and, we too, have been growing our presence and have been drama free. This may be the longest stretch I've gigged totally drama free and I've been gigging steady for 12 years.:thu:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

Mike ,, your band has one major deal that will make guys take a wait and see approach. You have a member that dates your singer. lots of guys will hang around and see how that really works when things get to the point where everyone goes back to their normal behavior. in the audition dance ,, everyone is always all positive , cheery and happy. a month or two into the process you get to see what the band is really like. i know i am comming out with alot of negative vibes. Part of that may be cause i am all stressed up today ,, I got to hit the road for a 1600 mile road trip back to michigan ,,,, god I hate this day ... clean , pack , wait , delay ,, and drive , and drive and drive. 2 and a half days on the road. Just thought i would explain why I am in bummer mode .. but i do think i made some points that go along with the audition process. I just got done with a couple year process of joining and trading up on bands.....till I found some keepers. I know how to get asked to join , i know how to slip out the door ,, and i know how to load out.. and i know how to keep my seat. I also know how to do it without burning the bridge.

 

 

That could be. We make sure that we keep business as business and assure people that's the way it is. Of course, people have no way of knowing that when they first meet us. Two bass players ago, the guy said to us "you know, I've been in this band 6 months and you have never once shown signs that you're dating". He knew from the beginning that we were dating, but there ya have it.

 

When we talked to the new bass player about it, he told us that he never thought it would be a problem. So I guess that's good, too.

 

Take a lot of good music with you for your trip! Be safe!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.


×
×
  • Create New...