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How do you force a band to tighten up?


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"I've got to carry you AND pay you?? F off!"

 

well said. if you're the boss, you call the shots. what's dickheadish about demanding professionalism from professionals?! note that i definitely don't recommend this approach for the OP, at least not at this stage of the game!

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A few thing that have been useful for me:


Record practices and listen back

Play in total darkness

Play the songs
extremely
slowly

Play the songs with a click

Play the songs without drums

Break songs down into individual parts and play those parts repeatedly

 

 

These are the answers to this issue....:thu:

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Oh I don't doubt it; some of the best in every field are dickheads
:D

 

Both Buddy Rich and Art Blakey were well known for hiring young players. I've heard interviews talking about the experience with each (and know someone who played for BR.) The experiences described are very different, and I'll bet if you listen to recordings from each band, you'll hear it in the music.

 

It's the nature of the groove.

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Both Buddy Rich and Art Blakey were well known for hiring young players. I've heard interviews talking about the experience with each (and know someone who played for BR.) The experiences described are very different, and I'll bet if you listen to recordings from each band, you'll hear it in the music.


It's the nature of the groove.

 

Sounds like a tough gig.

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If a guy survived ,, think of the resume. I survived buddy rich. whooooo hooooooo

 

 

I think both would be transformative experiences. Don't know what the average tenure is in either band or whether people get fired vs quitting. The guy I knew, umm, changed professions and doesn't come up on a google search.

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Yeah... sorta.
"the more you have to think about what
you
are playing, the less attention you are able to pay to your bandmates.


But when your clock is solid, and when your buddy's clock is solid, listening is intuitive. There's no furrowed eyebrow listening. It happens. Or it doesn't cause they're hacks.


First step, regardless of the issue, get your clock together. Talk around it anyway you wish but it all comes back to being uber comfortable with the clock. Your heartbeat. Then when you get 3, 4 + members doing the same... listening isn't the word. You get to experience something way beyond just listening.

 

 

I don't disagree with hardly anything you wrote here, but I would say this:

It would be great if I was playing with a bunch of guys that were all

"Uber comfortable with the clock", but some of us (probably most) are not that fortunate. So, agreed that "when your clock is solid, and when your buddy's clock is solid, listening is intuitive" and "You get to experience something way beyond just listening." Agreed 100%. But, if and when it's NOT happening (often due to a lack of famialiarity with the particular piece of music as much as anything else) I don't chalk that up to my buddy me being "hacks". I can, however, understand how and why a talented, experienced, professional musician that's played/playing at the "major league level" would think so, although I think it's a bit mean spirited to think of it that way. (kind of like Nolan Ryan calling a High School pitcher a bum because he doesn't have a 100 mph fastball IMO).

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Sounds like a tough gig.

 

 

 

I saw a Buddy Rich show in the 70's. I was literally right up front. Just freaking amazing. Yes, Buddy was an asshole. I've seen him 3 times actually, but both of these incidences occurred on the same night.

 

1. Buddy stands up in the middle of a tune. No drums!. The band fizzles. Buddy walks over to a young 3rd trumpet, stares at him, reaches to his music stand and grabs all the charts and throws them. Scatter!!!!!!! Then he points offstage. As in "You, get your ass off stage." Then he walked back to the drums and counted them back in.

 

2. Same night. A guy walks up to the stage as Buddy is addressing the crowd and (bad judgment on his part I'd say) hands Buddy a classic, old LP with a picture of Buddy kicking ass on the cover. The guy's proud he actually has this, apparently rare disc. Buddy takes it. Says into the mike, "I haven't seen this is years and years. Man!" Then he throws it out into the crowd over the guys head. It's gone! Buddy then says, "Sit the {censored} down!!!"

 

 

But God, he was good. Great. His band completely slayed my ass that night. Incredible. Lovely chap.

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One thing i have notices about playing with different drummers. Until you play with one or some that really know how to keep it right on the money its hard for alot of people to really lock on. If a guy has never had the experiene of playing with one thats rock solid... its hard for guys to learn tight. I was lucky as a kid that our town had a killer drum teacher. Every one of his students were rock solid. I played in bands with three different drummers he taught. The typical audition for his people were ,, oh eddy is your drum teacher .. .cool you wanna play drums in a band. Never saw a bad one come out of his studio. I think the studio is still in existance. He was the best and turned out the best. I dont think he kept students around that could not get with the program...

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Most drummers don't know how to swing. If you play BANG BANG BANG BANG, I don't care how much you play OUT of those beats . . . It's still more of a drive than a swing. If you play INTO to beat, you leave room for everyone else to play.

 

The guy I mentioned who played with Buddy Rich was previously in the one o'clock lab band at North Texas State. He said he'd rather play with the drummer who was our mutual friend. If you ever get to play with someone who understands the difference between a push/drive style and a swing style, it will affect your playing . . in a good way.

 

Of course now that you've got room to play . . . . PLAY. It's kind of intimidating, actually.

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I think the answer is clear....


Q: "How do you force a band to tighten up?"


A: "Hire Buddy Rich as the drummer"

 

 

I think the buddy rich method involves firing everybody eventually.

 

I suppose that might work for the band, but not for the people.

 

I think recording any playing back is probably the safest way to present performance problems. If they got ears, they'll hear the problems. if they don't hear the problems, you got an answer on whether they can fix it.

 

Breaking a song up, and only a few instruments is also a good way to work on and identify the loose spots and players.

 

Be prepared for the loose player being the one who doesn't see the problem.

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You know, Steve Vai said something along the lines of: "don't let your intensity make you a prick".

 

Too bad Buddy didn't get the memo; I'd pay money to see somebody bust him in his chops for pulling that asshole routine.

 

Being a great musician does not give you a free pass to treat people like {censored}. :idea:

 

(and yes, I'm aware that Mr. Rich is no longer among the living.)

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