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Not to be a dick, but as a professional sales manager, I wouldn't hire anyone who took this type of approach. {censored}, I wouldn't trust you to cut my grass. A recap of this article in one sentence: "When trying to book your band, lie your ass off." This used car salesman sleazy approach drives me crazy in the professional world and I certainly would never apply it to booking our band.

 

How about a very simple approach. Be professional. Dress nice when visiting clubs. If the club owner says, call me after 2 tomorrow and we'll talk, call him at 2:05. Club owners get lying sacks of {censored} in every day that lie about who they are and what they're going to draw, why not differentiate yourself by being honest?

 

In a nutshell, I would tell anyone to disregard anything in this article.

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+1000!

 

I'm sorry, but how do you expect to get away with this anyway if you're a member of the freaking band? What will they say when "Joe Lilly" of "Lilly Entertainment" shows up schlepping a guitar case? Or, should we hire "roadies" to load in our gear? Perhaps a fill in player so they won't know you're the player? Hey, you gotta spend money to make money, right?

 

Yeah, sorry, but this article is utter crap. TrickyBoy's approach is the one I take, and it works just fine. Ask Wheresgrant how Nuts in a Blender have clearly established themselves in their region. I bet it wasn't by lying through their teeth.

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I don't think a lot of this works in the area of booking a cover band in a local venue. For that, there is no substitute for face time and professionalism.

Hell, if you call any of the clubs I play and ask for someone's voicemail, the bartender answering the phone will say "You're talking to it"!!!

We all exaggerate a bit when trying to impress a club owner/booker, but the "bigshot agent" technique is a bit over the top and will most certainly bite you in the ass when it gets discovered.

There is no magic bullet. Have a good promo kit, be professional, be friendly & follow up in person. When given a gig opportunity, start on time, don't be too loud, be entertaining and hold the crowd. Don't get drunk, be courteous to the bar staff, load in and out quickly and clean up after yourselves.

You will be asked back.

Different rules for original bands. I'll let those experts chime in...

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first off we do not lie to get in the door. We are an honest band with a decent sound and some decent promo material. We tend to build a relationship with the club owner/manager. It's better that way.

 

We also have a woman who is our booking rep. and she takes care of 90% of the bookings and I take the rest. I do think it's has been working better for us since we have someone not in the band represent the band to club owners but that's just me.

 

One musician I know popped in my head while reading this article. his band is having a hard time right now because he has been telling lies to the clubs they play at and when it comes time to deliver they can't. They are losing rooms left & right. Some of our best rooms are now not hiring this band back because of the bull{censored} approach he uses.

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We tend to build a relationship with the club owner/manager. It's better that way.

 

 

This is so important. We are really working at building relationships with the main clubs we play that we hope to be long-term. Hard to do that when you're foot in the door was dishonesty.

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This is so important. We are really working at building relationships with the main clubs we play that we hope to be long-term. Hard to do that when you're foot in the door was dishonesty.

 

 

agreed! and if we are playing out of our hometown we don't promise a draw. We can't promise that and we don't. But we do tell them we will entertain the hell out of the people who are there!

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" You have a decent following. But for some reasons the bar owners and booking guys aren't following up and don't answer your calls. "

 

Your following isn't as big as you think it is, if you can't get a bar owner to book you. A band with a huge following will have no problem getting booked, and if they do have a problem for whatever reason, why wouldn't they just rent their own place and make a bunch more money?

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" You have a decent following. But for some reasons the bar owners and booking guys aren't following up and don't answer your calls. "


Your following isn't as big as you think it is, if you can't get a bar owner to book you. A band with a huge following will have no problem getting booked, and if they do have a problem for whatever reason, why wouldn't they just rent their own place and make a bunch more money?

 

 

right. Your following isn't as big as you think it is. We have a good following as long as we play in our hometown. If We go an hour away we don't have a following that is as good. Its just how it is for us. It's getting better but we don't have a large group that will travel all over Northeastern PA for us.

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Not to be a dick, but as a professional sales manager, I wouldn't hire anyone who took this type of approach. {censored}, I wouldn't trust you to cut my grass. A recap of this article in one sentence: "When trying to book your band, lie your ass off." This used car salesman sleazy approach drives me crazy in the professional world and I certainly would never apply it to booking our band.


In a nutshell, I would tell anyone to disregard anything in this article.

 

Well, it is obvious that this Nixon guy is "one of those". As is the article's author "baldguitardude". This is a forum for musicians to HANG. I don't come here and PROMOTE my band(s), I come here to hang and talk with other musos who are digging in the trenches.

 

This dude is your typical music biz asshat. Saw TONS of 'em in my years in Nashville. And some got work, but once word got around, it was funny how their work dried up. I was a sideman for signed artists for years, and I would NEVER recommend someone for a gig who acted like this.

 

So what happens when the owner finds out you are willing lie your ass off? He'll be looking for a reason to NOT trust you. This is the kind of bull{censored} that gives musicians a bad name.

 

ATTN MR. NIXON: If you want to come in here and hang, cool. But don't bring this promo bull{censored} in here. Advising musicians to be lying douchebags makes you...wait for it...a lying douchebag.:mad:

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agreed! and if we are playing out of our hometown we don't promise a draw. We can't promise that and we don't. But we do tell them we will entertain the hell out of the people who are there!

 

 

Bingo.

 

To extrapolate, you don't promise anything... repeat... ANYTHING if there is even a 1% chance it won't happen. You end up looking like the asshat.

 

Professionalism when you do contact them and PERSISTANCE if you don't. We had to call once a week to this one venue and eventually it turned into "we had a cancellation and need a band, The Regulars keep calling..." and now we're on their monthly rotation.

 

I would also hazard that you stay away from booking agents with bad reputations, because reputations are easy to drop and difficult to build up.

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There is no magic bullet. Have a good promo kit, be professional, be friendly & follow up in person. When given a gig opportunity, start on time, don't be too loud, be entertaining and hold the crowd. Don't get drunk, be courteous to the bar staff, load in and out quickly and clean up after yourselves.

You will be asked back.

Different rules for original bands. I'll let those experts chime in...

 

 

Actually, in my experience not that different at all, except "have a good promo kit" translates to "have music and info online", and nobody books anything face to face anymore; it's almost all email/MySpace.

 

And lying about your draw will only hurt you. The main thing, in short, is building a good professional relationship with the bookers at venues. (People here say "owner" a lot, but I've hardly ever dealt with an owner who has anything to do with booking; it's generally someone hired to do that)

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Hey all,

Interesting feedback so far :) I've definitely gotten a lot of positives as well as some hating as well. When you post polarizing things there will always be a mix of both. I'll respond to some of the criticisms. Thanks.

 

This dude is your typical music biz asshat. Saw TONS of 'em in my years in Nashville. And some got work, but once word got around, it was funny how their work dried up. I was a sideman for signed artists for years

 

Actually I'm not a "typical" music business guy by any means. I'm a full time player and professional musician. Here's a link to my resume http://stevenixonmusic.net/bio.cfm

My work has not dried up at all. I have way more gig offers than I can even possibly handle at this point in my career. This is a blessing from years of hard work on the artistic level and on the business level. I'm serious about my art and still practice over 3 hours a day. Music is my life.

3shiftgtr... What artists have you played for? I would love to hear some of your playing. Got anything posted for us to hear?

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you want the truth? If you want to play 200 gigs a year and earn more money than any of your musician friends do the following:

 

1. Poll 30 of your musician friends for the 10 songs they are most sick of playing. You know the ones, brown eyed girl, maragaritaville, mustang sally, blah blah blah.

2. Enter all of those songs into a database and make the songs most often mentioned into your setlist.

3. Hire two singers: A hot chick and a good looking guy. Pay them more than everyone else. Make sure they are talented vocalists.

4. Rehearse 3 times a week for 4 months until you have your setlist down cold.

5. Shoot a promo video of a rehearsal with audio.

 

after steps 1-5 start booking. Clubs will love you. The crowd will love you. private parties and corporate gigs will follow.

 

6. Poll same musicians as to the songs they are most sick of that range between 75bmp and 95bpm. Make same list as before. This is your restaurant setlist.

7. Any time a band member has an original idea punch him in the face. This band is for making money, not having fun.

 

 

There. A 100% foolproof plan for making more money as a musician than you are currently making as well as booking more gigs than you are currently playing.

 

Personally, I play exactly as many gigs as I want to. I haven't sung a song I didn't want to sing in my band (solo acoustic night... if the chick is hot enough or the money is big enough my dignity is for sale) in 4 years. Would I like more money? Sure. Do I want to play Jesse's Girl? No.

You're assuming that everyone shares your goals. Not everyone wants to play 100 gigs a year. Or 50 gigs a year. Personally, I got into music because I love playing it. I have as much fun playing a gig as a drummer for two beer tickets and 66% of a pizza (think about it and you'll get it) as I do playing gigs where I earn $500. Do I prefer the money, yes but my musical value system is based on personal enjoyment, not money.

 

-rant over.

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you want the truth? If you want to play 200 gigs a year and earn more money than any of your musician friends do the following:


1. Poll 30 of your musician friends for the 10 songs they are most sick of playing. You know the ones, brown eyed girl, maragaritaville, mustang sally, blah blah blah.

2. Enter all of those songs into a database and make the songs most often mentioned into your setlist.

3. Hire two singers: A hot chick and a good looking guy. Pay them more than everyone else. Make sure they are talented vocalists.

4. Rehearse 3 times a week for 4 months until you have your setlist down cold.

5. Shoot a promo video of a rehearsal with audio.


after steps 1-5 start booking. Clubs will love you. The crowd will love you. private parties and corporate gigs will follow.


6. Poll same musicians as to the songs they are most sick of that range between 75bmp and 95bpm. Make same list as before. This is your restaurant setlist.

7. Any time a band member has an original idea punch him in the face. This band is for making money, not having fun.



There. A 100% foolproof plan for making more money as a musician than you are currently making as well as booking more gigs than you are currently playing.


Personally, I play exactly as many gigs as I want to. I haven't sung a song I didn't want to sing in my band (solo acoustic night... if the chick is hot enough or the money is big enough my dignity is for sale) in 4 years. Would I like more money? Sure. Do I want to play Jesse's Girl? No.

You're assuming that everyone shares your goals. Not everyone wants to play 100 gigs a year. Or 50 gigs a year. Personally, I got into music because I love playing it. I have as much fun playing a gig as a drummer for two beer tickets and 66% of a pizza (think about it and you'll get it) as I do playing gigs where I earn $500. Do I prefer the money, yes but my musical value system is based on personal enjoyment, not money.


-rant over.

 

 

Word.

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you want the truth? If you want to play 200 gigs a year and earn more money than any of your musician friends do the following:


1. Poll 30 of your musician friends for the 10 songs they are most sick of playing. You know the ones, brown eyed girl, maragaritaville, mustang sally, blah blah blah.

2. Enter all of those songs into a database and make the songs most often mentioned into your setlist.

3. Hire two singers: A hot chick and a good looking guy. Pay them more than everyone else. Make sure they are talented vocalists.

4. Rehearse 3 times a week for 4 months until you have your setlist down cold.

5. Shoot a promo video of a rehearsal with audio.


after steps 1-5 start booking. Clubs will love you. The crowd will love you. private parties and corporate gigs will follow.


6. Poll same musicians as to the songs they are most sick of that range between 75bmp and 95bpm. Make same list as before. This is your restaurant setlist.

7. Any time a band member has an original idea punch him in the face. This band is for making money, not having fun.



There. A 100% foolproof plan for making more money as a musician than you are currently making as well as booking more gigs than you are currently playing.

 

"Post of the day" award! :eek:

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Please tell me exactly where in the article Joe says you should
lie
? At no point does Joe state that you should lie to club owners.

 

 

" I represent a number of regional acts in the Midwest and happen to have a fantastic group pulling through your neck of the woods "

 

" If I'm on the phone just leave a message with my receptionist"

 

" Call on behalf of yourself and act like your own gatekeeper"

 

" Almost nobody notices similarities in your voice enough to realize that you are acting like someone you aren't. At most you'll get "You guys sound a lot alike," to which you say "yeah I don't like to talk about it but he's my half brother."

 

 

"Call on as your alter ego and say the following: "Hey X, how've you been? It's Steve. Haven't heard from you in a while so I thought I'd call and see what you're up to. My number in case you forgot it is XXX-XXXX. Oh, by the way, man, I have great news about - [click] -." And, that's right, hang up the phone mid-message. Just make sure you leave your number before you hang up. Mr. X will call you back within 72 hours. When Mr. X calls back, just remember the name you used and act as if you've been representing the band (a la step 1)."

 

 

Nope, nothing dishonest or sleazy here.

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you want the truth? If you want to play 200 gigs a year and earn more money than any of your musician friends do the following:


/SNIP/


1. Poll 30-rant over.

 

 

I would feel much better about myself following this advice.

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-." And, that's right, hang up the phone mid-message. Just make sure you leave your number before you hang up. Mr. X will call you back within 72 hours. When Mr. X calls back, just remember the name you used and act as if you've been representing the band (a la step 1)."



Nope, nothing dishonest or sleazy here.

 

 

Ouch!:cop:

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Actually I'm not a "typical" music business guy by any means. I'm a full time player and professional musician. Here's a link to my resume
http://stevenixonmusic.net/bio.cfm

 

Neat resume, but is that really your resume or is part 2 of getting booked "List a bunch of famous people you have played with" :poke:.

 

Look, I'm sure you're great and you and Wyclef are boys :blah::blah::blah:, but if you read that article and don't find huge moral dilemmas, you and I have a different moral compass (and I'll note that I'm far from a pillar of morality).

 

The only thing missing from that article was, "call the booking person as a club owner from a fictitious club and act as a reference for your band".

 

If you're doing as well as you say you are congrats. But I'll bet underhanded bull{censored} techniques like this had nothing to do with it. In fact, if you using these goofy techniques, IMO you're succeeding in spite of them.

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you want the truth? If you want to play 200 gigs a year and earn more money than any of your musician friends do the following:


1. Poll 30 of your musician friends for the 10 songs they are most sick of playing. You know the ones, brown eyed girl, maragaritaville, mustang sally, blah blah blah.

2. Enter all of those songs into a database and make the songs most often mentioned into your setlist.

3. Hire two singers: A hot chick and a good looking guy. Pay them more than everyone else. Make sure they are talented vocalists.

4. Rehearse 3 times a week for 4 months until you have your setlist down cold.

5. Shoot a promo video of a rehearsal with audio.


after steps 1-5 start booking. Clubs will love you. The crowd will love you. private parties and corporate gigs will follow.


6. Poll same musicians as to the songs they are most sick of that range between 75bmp and 95bpm. Make same list as before. This is your restaurant setlist.

7. Any time a band member has an original idea punch him in the face. This band is for making money, not having fun.



There. A 100% foolproof plan for making more money as a musician than you are currently making as well as booking more gigs than you are currently playing.


Personally, I play exactly as many gigs as I want to. I haven't sung a song I didn't want to sing in my band (solo acoustic night... if the chick is hot enough or the money is big enough my dignity is for sale) in 4 years. Would I like more money? Sure. Do I want to play Jesse's Girl? No.

You're assuming that everyone shares your goals. Not everyone wants to play 100 gigs a year. Or 50 gigs a year. Personally, I got into music because I love playing it. I have as much fun playing a gig as a drummer for two beer tickets and 66% of a pizza (think about it and you'll get it) as I do playing gigs where I earn $500. Do I prefer the money, yes but my musical value system is based on personal enjoyment, not money.


-rant over.

 

 

 

This has surpassed the "video taping yourself banging two girls but deciding to stop {censored}ing because you saw something in the vid you didn't like" as my all-time favorite ACB post.

 

But I play Jesse's Girl:facepalm:. (My wife loves that damn song. And American Girl too)

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There's a dude at my work with the last name of "Clinton".

 

One of my co-workers kept calling him "Bob Nixon" (not the real first name), and I said: "His last name is 'Clinton'"

 

He replies: "Clinton, Nixon - what's the difference?"

 

:facepalm:

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