Jump to content

Collecting email addresses at a gig - legal?


Cirrus

Recommended Posts

  • Members

Hey,

 

Firstly I'm in the UK so I know that there might be differences in the law between here and the US, but does anyone know if there's any legal implications to collecting email addresses from fans at gigs for a mailing list?

 

I think it's a really great idea, our drummer and manager both think it's illegal. I don't really see how it could be as long as it's clear at the time that they're signing up to recieve emails promoting our gigs and releases etc, and that we offer an easy way to unsubscribe.

 

Would appreciate any comments you guys have on the matter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

Hey,


Firstly I'm in the UK so I know that there might be differences in the law between here and the US, but does anyone know if there's any legal implications to collecting email addresses from fans at gigs for a mailing list?


I think it's a really great idea, our drummer and manager both think it's illegal. I don't really see how it could be as long as it's clear at the time that they're signing up to recieve emails promoting our gigs and releases etc, and that we offer an easy way to unsubscribe.


Would appreciate any comments you guys have on the matter.

 

 

I'm no expert on UK law, but I really cannot imagine that asking people for their email addresses is illegal in any country in the world.

 

 

 

That said, I would never give away my email address unless some promises are made (say on top of the piece of paper where the addresses are collected), like these:

 

* These email addresses will not be given to third parties. THIS IMPLIES THAT EMAILS WILL BE SENT USING "BCC" NOT "TO" OR "CC".

(People that send mass emails without hiding the addresses annoy the hell out of me and every other internet-savvy person.)

 

* All emails will be band related (about upcoming shows, releases, etc) and at most once a month/week.

 

* Unsubscribing can be done simply by replying to the email.

 

 

 

Now if you make these promises and later break them, I can imagine this can be interpreted as contract breach, so that would be illegal. (I don't think anyone will take you to court though. They will mostly be annoyed and stop coming to your shows.)

 

 

 

Anyway, these days, with myspace being dead, it seems that collecting email addresses from fans and using these wisely to inform about upcoming shows is one of the best ways to do band promotion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

If you want legal advice, go to an attorney (solicitor).


Do not trust anything you read online (including this),
especially
legal advice!

 

Thanks, I was just asking for common sense opinions to make sure I wasn't off base; I know I'm not in a forum filled with lawyers.

 

If I wanted that, I'd have asked on the gear page... :lol:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

I highly doubt people even have any legal authority over their e-mail accounts. They are owned by the email service provider.

 

At the same time, you don't want to piss off your fans by sending out junk mail or distributing their email address to others in a giant CC list when all they want is updates from your band such as show dates or releases.

 

 

If you want legal advice, go to an attorney (solicitor).


Do not trust anything you read online (including this), especially legal advice!

 

 

This too, but seriously don't waste money on legal help for an email list that every band and their moma's have been doing since I can remember from every original type show I've ever been too.

 

My former band had a mail list where we would send out our show dates. . .never got sued, but sure helped the turn outs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

We have a sign-up sheet at gigs all the time. That's how people hear about gigs, etc. Cannot imagine anything wrong with it, as long as the people themselves are willingly giving their e-mail info.

 

 

+1

 

Our other guitar player is in charge of keeping our list and sending out our e-mail notices. He has been working in web marketing for nearly as long as there has been such a thing. If there were a problem with collecting e-mail addresses, I'm pretty sure he would know.

 

Yes, we always use BCC so as not to inadvertently distribute those addresses to others.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

I agree. If you put some fine print on your sign-up sheet, I think you'll be ok. And more importantly, your band should have a privacy policy and follow it. If you do that, you'll be ok.

 

FWIW, we have a sign-up list at every show (usually manned by my wife or some of our 'regulars') & mention it about once/ set over the PA. Our singer usually says something along the lines of 'not going to send you junk mail', but I think that adding a 'privacy statement' to the sign-up sheet as well would be a good idea.

 

Since I manage the mailings for the band, I think that I might also attach some fine-print to the footer of our future emails, just to give our fans some extra piece of mind.

 

BTW, it's been 2+ years and 500+ email addresses since we've started 'the list' & the only issues we've had so far have been 2 or 3 people who've requested to be removed from future mailings :idk: Of course, we've also gotten a good share of dead, fake, and illegible addresses (never ask a drunk person to write legibly :facepalm: )

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Im a California attorney and I cannot even fathom of any legal implications with this. A number of practical concerns have already been raied. Even in the UK, I cannot see why there would be any prohibition against anyone voluntarily providing an email address. We have a sign up sheet at every show and on our web page as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...