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If wedding gigs went smooth...


Outkaster

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true story - we're playing a wedding and the old guy who fronts the band (local legend who went by the name of Itch) drops on stage having a heart attack. 911 is called. Now the local hospital is directly across the street from the reception venue. We hear the the sirens as the ambulance blazes out of the hospital lot.......and then the sound fades as the ambulance flies down the street away from us. WTF?!! oh wait......it's coming back.......and zip past us again going the other direction now. Well the band and attendees were pretty pissed by now. The ambulance finally gets its bearings and rolls into the ballroom parking lot. Naturally it is now pouring rain and there are a couple hundred previously well dressed folks standing outside trying to wave down these idiots. The ambulance pulls up, the driver hops out and the best man immediately drops him with a punch to the face. So.......now picture the band leader strapped to a gurney being wheeled out........followed by the best man in cuffs. We went back in and finished the gig minus Itch. He recovered, not sure what happened to the best man.

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I actually like the challenge of learning the offbeat songs. Keeps me thinking outside my usual boxes. And sometimes, if they work well, the songs stick around.

 

Next wedding coming up they are asking us to learn "Can't Get Enough Of Your Love Babe" (Barry White, not Bad Co.), "All You Need Is Love" and "Total Eclispe of the Heart.

 

I'm not sure I could think of 3 more different tunes to throw at the band at once!

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Next wedding coming up they are asking us to learn "Can't Get Enough Of Your Love Babe" (Barry White, not Bad Co.)...

 

 

Unless you're strictly playing "kiddie bars" - don't be at all surprised if that tune sticks in your playlist for awhile if you've got somebody who can do the vocals justice. That little bass voice spoken intro is damn recognizable. We often slot it in the back half of our first set - and consistently get a good response to the tune.

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Unless you're strictly playing "kiddie bars" - don't be at all surprised if that tune sticks in your playlist for awhile if you've got somebody who can do the vocals justice. That little bass voice spoken intro is damn recognizable. We often slot it in the back half of our first set - and consistently get a good response to the tune.

 

 

I have no doubt it would be. The disco stuff we do does well and I know this is one of the bigger disco songs for a lot of bands.

 

Like you said though, depends on the vocals though whether it ends up being a keeper or not.

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Back when I did 'em, they were pretty good. The pay was good, they often went into OT which meant even better pay, and the musicians were very well-rounded and competent.

 

It's not the job of the bride and groom to book you a room. Many is the time I finished playing an upstate (or Conn or Pocono or NJ) gig, and drove directly home after I'd packed the drums in the car.

 

The point is weddings are a pain in the ass.

 

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Back when I did 'em, they were pretty good. The pay was good, they often went into OT which meant even better pay, and the musicians were very well-rounded and competent.


It's not the job of the bride and groom to book you a room. Many is the time I finished playing an upstate (or Conn or Pocono or NJ) gig, and drove directly home after I'd packed the drums in the car.

 

 

Guess what it was in our rider. SO they were responsible.

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Guess what it was in our rider. SO they were responsible.

 

 

Communication is the key. I've never had a problem with a wedding gig. In fact, I find them to be among the least trouble-free gigs we do.

 

If they are supposed to provide rooms, I make sure we've been given details about where the rooms are in advance instead of waiting-to-find-out-when-we-get there. And calling the hotel ahead of time to make sure of the reservations isn't a bad idea either.

 

Keeping in touch with the bride or the wedding planner or Dad or whoever is in charge of the details is key. Calling a week or two before the event to make sure everything we need is taken care of is mandatory.

 

I don't schedule vacations without double checking reservations and other details. I CERTAINLY don't want my gigs to be any more left-to-chance.

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No need to be so touchy. I can only tell you I've done dozens of weddings and never once had to deal with there being no rooms or ever feeling like the people don't know how to treat or hire live entertainment.

 

More often than not, I find people at weddings going out of their way to be accomodating for the band which is FAR more than I can say about most nightclubs I've worked at.

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We're going to do it in that 'direction' for sure. Using profanity at a wedding isn't something we do, but if anyone in the audience is so inclined to help us out in that regard, we'll give them the space to do so!

 

 

you need to get the bridal party to the front of the dance floor to sing along. This will be so... SO incredibly awesome.

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This is why you write everything into the contract that you need... and follow up multiple times in the the weeks leading up to every wedding reception to ensure the clients follow through. It's not hard... but that's why you get paid so much better to do weddings.... because it's more back-end and logistical work.

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the last wedding my band played was a MESS....utter mess..... we learnt all the songs the bride wanted...had them down REAL tight...sound check went so smooth everything was sounding INSANELY awesome (this should of tipped me off we were doomed) We get on stage and begin to play the first dance, this song I played my electric and the other guitarist used an Acoustic, went amazingly well... 2nd song same set up.. me on electric other guitarist on acoustic, another hit... time to pick up the pace a bit, other guitarist switches over to his electric...no sound from the amp....starts messing with stuff...nothing..... our drummer looks confused, the display on his drum pad is dead.... still nothing from the amp...we start checking EVERYTHING....all the while.....DEAD AIR.... we go to the DJ and continue messing with stuff.... about 20 minutes later we find out the outlet on stage where the amp and drum pad are plugged in has decided to give low voltage... but by this time the DJ has the party swinging so it didn't make sense going back on. We later found out that the plug on the stage for some stupid reason was on the same circuit as the kitchen equipment so during sound check we were fine as the kitchen wasn't in use, come time for the wedding the kitchen was in full swing...... worst part was a 30 Foot extension chord could of fixed everything.....

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Knowing what you know, it is your responsibility to follow up on all the details BEFORE the wedding day. The only surprises you find are the ones you didn't get hammered out well in advance. These people are having a wedding ONCE... this is your job ALL THE TIME. You are responsible for you.

 

Sorry to be the bad guy, but musicians , for the most part, are a bunch of lazy crybabies that expect everyone to know and understand their particular circumstances. You take control of you, and things will be fine.

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Communication is the key. I've never had a problem with a wedding gig. In fact, I find them to be among the least trouble-free gigs we do.


If they are supposed to provide rooms, I make sure we've been given details about where the rooms are in advance instead of waiting-to-find-out-when-we-get there.
And calling the hotel ahead of time to make sure of the reservations isn't a bad idea either.


Keeping in touch with the bride or the wedding planner or Dad or whoever is in charge of the details is key. Calling a week or two before the event to make sure everything we need is taken care of is mandatory.


I don't schedule vacations without double checking reservations and other details.
I CERTAINLY don't want my gigs to be any more left-to-chance.

 

 

:thu:EXACTLY!! Most people double check that everything is in order ahead of time even if they have booked the reservations themselves.

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We later found out that the plug on the stage for some stupid reason was on the same circuit as the kitchen equipment so during sound check we were fine as the kitchen wasn't in use, come time for the wedding the kitchen was in full swing...... worst part was a 30 Foot extension chord could of fixed everything.....

 

 

This certainly isn't limited to weddings, but gigs such as these are very often held in old buildings with sketchy power setups. I usually try to find somebody who works for the venue who, if isn't an actual person who knows the power setup (that guy always seems to be "off" on Saturdays...) at least find somebody who has seen other bands play there before. Try to find out where they plugged in, if any bands have blown circuits, that sort of thing. I do my best to find at least two separate circuits that don't look like they are connected to the kitchen or other major users of power. And if I can't trace the circuits, I'll run extension cords as far as I can so I can have at least a bit of hope that I've got enough power and two seperate circuits.

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Looks like most of the comments are about the reception side.


How guys feel abt the ceremony side of things for youse guyseses? (that was more what I was abt back in the day)


...just no more Pachelbel D Canon...ever

 

 

I've just started adding ceremony music to the package I offer. After doing enough weddings where I sit on my ass during the ceremony while some guy comes in and makes a quick $500 to play acoustic guitar for 45 minutes I decided I could do that myself. So I'll usually offer something like: "for just $250 more, we'll provide acoustic instrumental music during the ceremony!" They get a package deal, we're usually sitting there anyway, and I just have to tinkle around on an acoustic for a few minutes.

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