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Tendonitis Of The Fretboard Wrist


mineame

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Do any of you guitars player have this? If so, how are you dealing with it?


I am thinking about getting a brace for when I practice.

 

 

 

Its caused by repetitive motion. You need to change up the way you are doing things. different neck , and change the way you rig your strap. If that doesnt help , you gotta stop playing for it to heal up. I doubt that you will find a doc to put you on steroids for the condition. so you have to make it so you are working that wrist at a different angle.

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You are lucky it is just tendonitis. Take a break, maybe raise you guitar up a bit. Do some stretching.

 

The other side of this is Carpal Tunnel and you don't want that. I go in for surgery on Friday for Carpal Tunnel and I won't be able to play for six weeks.

 

Max

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I've had tendonitis in both wrists, twice each as I recall. What you are doing right now - sitting at a computer - is probably far more damaging than playing guitar. In fact, playing guitar was the ONLY time my wrists didn't hurt at one point in time. The first time this happened, I went to the doctor and was on a prescription anti-inflammatory for a week or so. The second time, the same doctor suggested that I just take Aleve on a daily basis until the inflammation went away, and again any time that it came back. That was several years ago, and although I play guitar regularly and use a computer for several hours a day, I only have to take Aleve a few days out of the entire year.

 

I also bought a thing called an IMAK SmartGlove for when I'm doing a LOT of typing. It has a semi-flexible brace that goes over the top of your wrist, and a cushion at the base/heel of your palm. Costs about $15 and works extremely well.

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Are you sure its the wrist?

 

I have tendons problems (I have them since about 5 years now) - it started as a pain in the wrist/fingers after lots of computer/mouse use or lots of guitar. The diagnostic was tenosynovitis and tendinitis.

 

But when you are still hurting after the initial 2-3 weeks of injury, its another condition. Tendinitis is the inflammatory part, normally it only last a couple of weeks tops.

 

What you more likely have is tendinosis, due to micro injuries over time.

 

I'm a lot better now. I got a massotherapist to treat my hand with massages and ultrasounds, and I started swimming 2-3 times a week. In two months its incredible how much better I feel.

 

Inazone is right. The computer is your worse enemy, not the guitar.

 

EDIT : Before you destroy your stomach with drugs, try ICE. It has to be F*CKING cold (just put a wet towell around the ice to prevent injury to your skin). 20 minutes, 3 times a day or everytime you are hurting.

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Inazone, thanks for the heads up on the IMAK SmartGlove. I just placed an order for some. I am starting to get some numbness in my right hand now and I need to start working on prevention.


Max

 

 

How old are you?

 

You say you are "starting" to get numbness, and you are already going through surgery?

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How old are you?


You say you are "starting" to get numbness, and you are already going through surgery?

 

 

I am 48 years old. I am having Carpal Tunnel surgery on my left hand on Friday.

 

My right hand has started to go numb while sleeping once and while, and that is how the whole thing started with my left hand. I went through years of on and off numbness in my left hand and then one day it just stayed that way.

 

Max

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I had tendonitis in my right elbow. Because it was work related, it was covered under worker's comp. This started last November and it took 2 visits to the WC doc, 5 to the orthopaedic doc, 6 to physical therapy and 11 months to resolve. I was making pretty good progress with the PT. They taught me how to do the transverse tendon massage and ice massage. Both of which were effective but pretty painful. Ultrasound therapy was good and the exercises were helpful as well. There is a product called biofreeze available at PT centers that works pretty well, too. It is similar to icy-hot etc. but the smell dissipates quickly. What finally knocked it out was a steroid injection in the tendon insert. It hurt like a blue mother for 72 hours, but I've been pretty much pain free for about 6 weeks now. Even if NSAIDs are taking care of it for now, it is worth looking into these techniques. Best of luck!:thu:

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I had it a few years ago. Had to take a few months off from playing and wear a brace that an orthopedist made for me. Rest is the only true cure (well, other than surgery). Every now and then I feel it kicking up again and I pull out the brace and ice and ibuprofin it.

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Do any of you guitars player have this? If so, how are you dealing with it?


I am thinking about getting a brace for when I practice.

 

I used to have pain in the junction of my fretting thumb and wrist.

 

I did some technique re-evaluation and research, and found that pointing the tip of my thumb towards the headstock has worked wonders for me.

 

The problem is often related to "clamping" the neck with your thumb. One exercise I picked up to avoid this is to hold your thumb off the back of the neck, and play chromatic passages with just your fingers.

 

Go easy though, you don't want to strain your tendons - the point is, you shouldn't be "clamping" your hand on the neck - your fingers should be doing all of the work.

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Do any of you guitars player have this? If so, how are you dealing with it?


I am thinking about getting a brace for when I practice.

 

 

 

I went through that and much much worse ultimately ending up with a completely numb hand which I cured myself using The Alexander Technique stretching...

 

Basically you deal with what you have by laying off..Laying off for a couple weeks man..seriously..You dont' want to hear this but you have to give it a rest..Then you have to learn Stretching..I stretch my arms A LOT and keep them loose. Then you have to learn self massage...That is really imporant..Keep limber and loose once your tendonitis heals and you'll be fine. Take some anti-inflammatory pills of your choice while it's healing and it hurts.....That is the secret and it's so simple yet so many people can't seem to fix themselves...First thing...LAY OFF AND REST THAT HAND...

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Medical science has never been so distorted as it is today.

 

Because of the pressure of "herbal" and "natural" remedy industries, which have little to no scientific proof to back them up... same with chiropractors - they claim not only can they crack your back and help you sit up straight, but they can CURE just about any and every ailment you have, including CTS.

 

All that pressure that since there is no evidence to the contrary, it MUST be considered safe & effective, and the medical community is scared to say BOO to them.

 

Release surgery has been the de-facto solution to CTS since the 1930's. Throughout the next 60 years of medical advancements, the only change has been recent to reduce heal times and scarring with endoscopic surgery.

 

But somehow the surge of the chiropractic and natural remedies in the 90's only ended up with the internet full of empty promises.

 

The real pisser is that CTS, if left untreated (or MIS-treated), will absolutely get worse over time, regardless of braces and "rest". Muscle atrophy will follow and permanent loss of feeling or movement can occur.

 

Any time the alexander method, or chiro actually CURES the problem, you can be assured that you were mis-diagnosed and clearly lucky that your mis-treatment was correct against the misdiagnosis.

 

Many of you will be pissed at me, but you should probably be pissed at the quack that misdiagnosed you.

 

There's only one de-facto test that is effective: the nerve-conduction test specifically for CTS. If you didn't get it, you are probably misdiagnosed and have tendonitis, or about 100 other conditions.

 

FWIW I'm just trying to save people the AGONY I lived thru until I finally saw a surgeon. I bought into every single "cure" only to come disturbingly close to permanent damage from waiting too long.

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The doctors that I have seen all say if I don't get the release surgery that I will get muscle atrophy and will lose the ability to move my thumb over time.

I am not going to let that happen!

 

I guess I will have more time to post in the next two months while I recover. Maybe I will set up my old Karaoke system and at least keep my voice in shape.

 

Max

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sure man..... Treat the symptom , NOT the cause just like the rest of medicine in this country... The Alexander Tech. And massage are not quackery. I find you assertions ignorant, biased, mallicious and void of fact. Have fun with that but Im glad your hand is better in any case.

 

I should add that I'm sure this could get to the point if it's untreated that you very well might need to get cut. I just knew NO ONE was cutting my fretting hand open without trying to get to the cause which was overuse and then try to use natural techniques to fix the issue. Fortunately I was able to. I would hazard mine was a bad case since my wrist was totally tingly, numb and stiff for almost 4 months but I nursed her back little by little. All I'm saying is I would and did exhaust all means available before I had to have my wrist operated on. I was successful and by the way, have since advised a couple other musicians when they developed bouts of repetitive stress. Both listened to me and alleviated their symptoms using The Alexander Technique, self massage and professional massage. YMMV

 

 

Medical science has never been so distorted as it is today.


Because of the pressure of "herbal" and "natural" remedy industries, which have little to no scientific proof to back them up... same with chiropractors - they claim not only can they crack your back and help you sit up straight, but they can CURE just about any and every ailment you have, including CTS.


All that pressure that since there is no evidence to the contrary, it MUST be considered safe & effective, and the medical community is scared to say BOO to them.


Release surgery has been the de-facto solution to CTS since the 1930's. Throughout the next 60 years of medical advancements, the only change has been recent to reduce heal times and scarring with endoscopic surgery.


But somehow the surge of the chiropractic and natural remedies in the 90's only ended up with the internet full of empty promises.


The real pisser is that CTS, if left untreated (or MIS-treated), will absolutely get worse over time, regardless of braces and "rest". Muscle atrophy will follow and permanent loss of feeling or movement can occur.


Any time the alexander method, or chiro actually CURES the problem, you can be assured that you were mis-diagnosed and clearly lucky that your mis-treatment was correct against the misdiagnosis.


Many of you will be pissed at me, but you should probably be pissed at the quack that misdiagnosed you.


There's only one de-facto test that is effective: the nerve-conduction test specifically for CTS. If you didn't get it, you are probably misdiagnosed and have tendonitis, or about 100 other conditions.


FWIW I'm just trying to save people the AGONY I lived thru until I finally saw a surgeon. I bought into every single "cure" only to come disturbingly close to permanent damage from waiting too long.

 

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Had my first gig last night since being diagnosed. It went great!

 

At first I was concerned because my wrist was in a significant amount of pain during the day.

 

As the gig started and went on, there was no pain. None today too! Hoping for the same tonight.

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There's only one de-facto test that is effective: the nerve-conduction test specifically for CTS. If you didn't get it, you are probably misdiagnosed and have tendonitis, or about 100 other conditions.

 

 

 

I got that test (EMG), it turned out negative. It was quick and not painfull at all, just a bit annoying. At least now I know my nerves are fine for now, and my problems are tendons.

 

Get the test if you ain't sure. Its nothing to be afraid about.

 

Massage and ultrasounds helped me a lot, but I don't have CTS.

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sure man..... Treat the symptom , NOT the cause just like the rest of medicine in this country... The Alexander Tech. And massage are not quackery. I find you assertions ignorant, biased, mallicious and void of fact. Have fun with that but Im glad your hand is better in any case.


 

I assert quite the opposite. There's books upon books of medical history that show release surgery, when supported by the nerve conduction test (solid verifiable proof of the actual cause), is in the 90% effective ratio. None of the chiropractic, massage, or therapy fields will dare even to suggest a success percentage- in fact, none even support the diagnosis method.

 

I challenge you, go look online, all claim to 'cure' CTS, but none will cite statistics of successes, nor can any cite confirmed diagnosis with success ratios.

 

As far as cause vs. symptom,.. what you suggest I am supporting is mislead- If you have the flu, do you treat the cause and just support the body's immune system, and ignore the 105 degree temperature? No.. you also treat the massive fever, which is ultimately the symptom that kills, and becomes the 'cause' even thought the virus is really the cause... The world isn't so black and white sometimes-

 

Same with CTS release surgery. Simply put- there's a bunch of tendons and nerves going thru a tunnel - The tunnel is too small, causing the nerves to rub on each other and the walls of the tunnel; which in turn creates irritation, which creates inflammation. long term effect - CTS.

 

Minus the inflammation, the tunnel is still too small. It happens as we use our hands far more than our ancestors- and then us musicians, and computer users are at even greater risk. Some people never get it, others will. CTS release surgery simply put just widens the tunnel. Your tendons aren't going to get any bigger or more inflammed than at the peak of CTS, so the surgery is a valid, simple, and effective procedure and dare I say - "treatment".

 

NOW..

Massage and chiro CAN be effective in reducing the inflammation and irritation; however, neither solution will widen the tunnel.

 

We will just have to agree to disagree if you don't see my points. :cool:

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I assert quite the opposite. There's books upon books of medical history that show release surgery, when supported by the nerve conduction test (solid verifiable proof of the actual cause), is in the 90% effective ratio. None of the chiropractic, massage, or therapy fields will dare even to suggest a success percentage- in fact, none even support the diagnosis method.


I challenge you, go look online, all claim to 'cure' CTS, but none will cite statistics of successes, nor can any cite confirmed diagnosis with success ratios.


As far as cause vs. symptom,.. what you suggest I am supporting is mislead- If you have the flu, do you treat the cause and just support the body's immune system, and ignore the 105 degree temperature? No.. you also treat the massive fever, which is ultimately the symptom that kills, and becomes the 'cause' even thought the virus is really the cause... The world isn't so black and white sometimes-


Same with CTS release surgery. Simply put- there's a bunch of tendons and nerves going thru a tunnel - The tunnel is too small, causing the nerves to rub on each other and the walls of the tunnel; which in turn creates irritation, which creates inflammation. long term effect - CTS.


Minus the inflammation, the tunnel is still too small. It happens as we use our hands far more than our ancestors- and then us musicians, and computer users are at even greater risk. Some people never get it, others will. CTS release surgery simply put just widens the tunnel. Your tendons aren't going to get any bigger or more inflammed than at the peak of CTS, so the surgery is a valid, simple, and effective procedure and dare I say - "treatment".


NOW..

Massage and chiro CAN be effective in reducing the inflammation and irritation; however, neither solution will widen the tunnel.


We will just have to agree to disagree if you don't see my points.
:cool:

 

I would only use Surgery as a LAST Resort.

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Also if you really have Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and not Tendonitis it will degenerate over time and eventually destroy a muscle in your hand that will leave you with a thumb that you are unable to move. This is all documented and proven medical science that was developed and tested over many years.

 

If you have not had a nerve conduction test done then you can't claim you had Carpal Tunnel Syndrome at all, there is nothing to back up that claim without the test.

 

Max

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