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We need to cut one of these venues...


mstreck

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I would keep both rooms in play. Take the restaurant/bar gig as the more regular and the rock club gig every once in a blue moon. Never know what's coming down in the future so always stay in a position of opportunity.

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Well, the restaurant just booked us for four gigs and also booked us for three acoustic gigs at their other location - so that's seven dates from January to May.

 

We gave our "established" place first crack and they've been slow to answer (said we were being overacheivers booking for 2011), so the soonest that we'll be able to squeeze them in is April.

 

The rock bar is probably going to have to wait until June.

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Is there a big equipment difference between the regular & acoustic gigs?

 

 

Absolutely... and the material is somewhat different as well.

 

The full band (5 piece) plays in-your-face dance and party rock and we use a full PA (subs, too). Acoustically, it's usually just Amy & Dave w/me sitting in on a few. We do more "mellow" stuff, plus some stripped down versions of our full band set. All we use is a Mackie powered mixer and speakers on sticks

 

They have two locations - the original is in an old firehouse in Pittsville, MD - and they only have acoustic acts - anything else is too loud. The newer location (where they have full bands) is in a high-traffic "travel plaza" in Laurel, DE. They took over the restaurant and gave it a firehouse theme. I'd be happy if they had about 20 fewer steps.

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Regardless of the fact that Option B means you have to have your mixer on-stage, does that mean definitively that the band (you) still has to mix themselves as well?

 

I'd consider befriending a competent engineer and ask how much he'd charge you for a briefcase gig at venue B: you supply and set-up the PA with mixer accessible from the side of the stage if at all possible, he sets up your initial sound-check mix and tweaks from side of stage throughout the night, you focus on playing/performing.

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Regardless of the fact that Option B means you have to have your mixer on-stage, does that mean definitively that the band (you) still has to mix themselves as well?


I'd consider befriending a competent engineer and ask how much he'd charge you for a briefcase gig at venue B: you supply and set-up the PA with mixer accessible from the side of the stage if at all possible, he sets up your initial sound-check mix and tweaks from side of stage throughout the night, you focus on playing/performing.

 

Well, we have to set up on an elevated square "island", closed in on three sides by a knee wall, with all of its dining tables pushed against the full wall behind us when we play. The knee wall wraps around about four feet in the front on both sides - but it's open enough to let us be seen by the people out front. It would be difficult for someone to access the mixer without needing to walk through us to get to it.

 

I've found out that this situation is only temporary. The regular "band hall" - located at the back of the restaurant - is closed while they install a bar. Once they open it back up, using a sound guy would pose no problem - and we have one on hand. :thu:

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Absolutely... and the material is somewhat different as well.


The full band (5 piece) plays in-your-face dance and party rock and we use a full PA (subs, too). Acoustically, it's usually just Amy & Dave w/me sitting in on a few. We do more "mellow" stuff, plus some stripped down versions of our full band set. All we use is a Mackie powered mixer and speakers on sticks


They have two locations - the original is in an old firehouse in Pittsville, MD - and they only have acoustic acts - anything else is too loud. The newer location (where they have full bands) is in a high-traffic "travel plaza" in Laurel, DE. They took over the restaurant and gave it a firehouse theme. I'd be happy if they had about 20 fewer steps.

 

 

 

being able to adjust the band size to fit the gigs is a good option. The outfit I am with can go on as a solo , a trio , and a full band. Tonight i got a trio gig for cajun night. The front guy has been working as a solo or duo this week

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being able to adjust the band size to fit the gigs is a good option. The outfit I am with can go on as a solo , a trio , and a full band. Tonight i got a trio gig for cajun night. The front guy has been working as a solo or duo this week

 

We were kinda forced into that situation. We were scheduled to play a no-pressure private party for a friend of our bass player's on the same weekend that our lead guitarist had to go out of town. I''m not a lead player, so we told the drummer to stay at home and I pulled out the acoustic and Dan played his bass (with Amy singing). We played most of our songlist that way - stripped down to just acoustic guitar and bass. Believe it or not, people danced most of the night!

 

So now we know that we can adapt to just about any situation that calls for a stripped-down version of the band, no matter who is not involved - unless it's Amy, then we're sunk! :facepalm:

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