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Mustang Sally Flow Chart


flanc

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I don't have to go back and re-read. I know what I write. I called the guys playing at the Holiday Inns "old farts". They were. Just like I'm an old fart now playing corporate gigs and weddings. And I went to the gigs for a laugh. Just like I certain most young kids would laugh at the gigs I do.


That has nothing to do with respect for the old farts as players. Just as I would hope most young kids laughing at my kids would at least respect my playing ability, even if it's a gig they wouldn't want to be doing until they were too old to be doing anything else.

 

 

I get what your saying man. When I was 18 we laughed at the old guys playing covers in the RSL clubs. Always wondering why these great muso's would waste time playing to drunken 35 year olds. I'd would've rather died than compromise "my art" by stooping so low.

 

I'd kill for that gig now.

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Out of curiosity, I'm wondering how many of you have played or are currently playing with a backbeat drummer, that being crucial to any decent rendition of Mustang Sally?

 

To be clear, a backbeat puts the snare ON 2 & 4 but equally important, takes the kick drum OFF 2 & 4. So many bands I hear - and sadly so many I auditioned with - keep that kick drum pounding on 1 2 3 4 all night . . . . like a HS marching band. That style of drumming takes so many old songs off the table because it pretty much eliminates the option of kicking with the band, as opposed to just keeping time. . . unless all the kicks fall somewhere on a quarter note pulse.

 

A backbeat also lends itself to an eighth note pulse and if that's your internal metronome, rather than quarter, music takes on a whole nuther groove.

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My hippy band played a gig that was somewhat out of our element last weekend. We play a lot of stuff that is somewhat danceable, and everything is groovable in a deadhead sort of way, but no real "dance" songs unless you consider stuff like Superstition dance music. We'd just finished playing "Will Go Round In Circles" which is probably one of the more danceable songs we do, and a girl somes up and asks if we can play anything they can dance to, like Mustang Sally. The guitar player starts joking about how in his entire life he's never played that song and has prided himself on that, and sorry, we don't know it. I pipe up and say "Glenn (the drummer who also plays in my other band) knows it!" So we play it, the band kills it, and the guitar player actually had a big grin on his face. He's the rhythm player and even took a solo and did a great job on it. It ended up being one of the fun spots of the night.

 

The other band has it on the list. We save it mostly for gigs where the crowd is older or we know they will like it.

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FWIW my band plays Mustang Sally at our quest ranch gig. The employees get to come in and dance with the guests and they LOVE that song. They have some sort of line dance worked up that they do when we play it. It is usually quite entertaining to watch 50-60 people doing it together. BTW the employees are young college kids from all over the country for the most part. One gal requests it every week and she is 21 from New York.

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i'm late to this but anyway... I never played it before a few years ago... and it wasn't even talked about being in our set. One night a cute biker chick asked for it so we whipped it up on the fly. It was OK. We play it on occasion by request or sometimes at an all age show if there are alot of older people around. like in this vid:

 

[video=youtube;B8T37SgOk1E]

 

I don't think we do it very well but people enjoy it. No one at our gigs will ever scream OMFG! THEY R PLAYIN SALLY!!!!!! AHHHHH! So it is not a must do, ever in our show... actually I don't think anyone has really requested it in the last 3 years.

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One gal requests it every week and she is 21 from New York.

 

 

um ... and she's working on a guest ranch in Montana! :D LOL Go figure! If I were working in Houston I probably wouldn't request "Enter Sandman"... maybe "Friends In Low Places"

 

 

But I'm sure you're not getting requests for "Jump Around"... but maybe if you played it you'd have just as many on the dance floor. ;)

 

Geography has alot to do with everything.

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You also get requests for the Gin Blossoms and alot of other 90's bands that fall flat here. Then again your probably not getting alot of requests to cover the Fugees. It could be that no one just thinks to ask for it... or maybe we're just a little ahead of the curve over here.
;)

 

Sorry for my OCD derail/re-visit, but...

 

Ahead of WHAT curve?

The Fugees are band from the 90's as well. And not even the LATE 90's at that.

 

But besides that...how exactly does playing Bon Jovi & Fugees songs in the year 2011 make one ahead of anything?

:cop:

:poke:

:poke:

:poke:

 

;)

 

 

 

 

(Totally taking the piss on that, BTW)

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Sorry for my OCD derail/re-visit, but...


Ahead of
WHAT
curve?

The Fugees are band from the 90's as well. And not even the LATE 90's at that.


But besides that...how exactly does playing Bon Jovi & Fugees songs in the year 2011 make one
ahead of
anything?

:cop:
:poke:

:poke:

:poke:


;)




(Totally taking the piss on that, BTW)

 

Probably not a great example... but I was refering to the perception of style vs age. Although there's only a few years in difference in between Gins Blossoms vs The Fugee's there can be a decade apart between the average age of the listener. Talk to my niece and the Gin Blossoms are an 'old' band... because their style and delivery of guitar oriented alternative rock doesn't transcend as well to her generation as hip hop. Billy Jean by all accounts is 'classic'... over a quarter of a century old. Yet it still transcends better to a younger audience than let's say "Eye Of The Tiger" or 'Land Down Under'.

 

Tbonehead has great success playing alot of guitar oriented alternative rock from the 1990's in MN... in NY you're playing that material to either playing to small bars or big empty rooms. Again geography plays a big role in this. I went to college in Western NY and bands there always seem 10 years behind the current radio trends. We we were based there I'm certain M. Sally would be a setlist staple. But living on the East Coast... between Philly, Boston and NYC we don't get requests for it.

 

Point made... poked back.

:poke:

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Sesame Street has been around for a long time. It has transcended many generations and the theme song packs the dance floor every night. You're 100% wrong in that instance. We played an 80 year old birthday party at a nursing home in Raleigh where the group flew in from Charlotte and that stuff had them dancing the entire time. We had offers out the wazoo, but unfortunately are booked for a funeral parlor and Ikea grand opening at the same time.

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Sesame Street has been around for a long time. It has transcended many generations and the theme song packs the dance floor every night. You're 100% wrong in that instance. We played an 80 year old birthday party at a nursing home in Raleigh where the group flew in from Charlotte and that stuff had them dancing the entire time. We had offers out the wazoo, but unfortunately are booked for a funeral parlor and Ikea grand opening at the same time.

 

 

 

LOL... well you should know that the theme to Sesame Street was originally recorded by Sam Phillips and Sun Studios in the 50's and optioned to Elvis as a B side to "Hound Dog". You should also understand that individuals in their 80's, positively responding to the theme song of Sesame Street is clear signs of advanced stages of Altzheimer's syndrome. You may have received gig offers they will never remember extending.

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I don't think I ever looked DOWN on them. They were just older dudes playing an older gig. Many of them were great players and I always respect a great player. But it certainly wasn't anything I wanted to do when I was in my 20s or 30s. It certainly wasn't where the Top 40 or modern rock was being played.

 

Things change, I guess. Back in 1972 I was invited to play bass for a band that was booked to tour Holiday Inns all over the country. Something like a four month deal. It was about a week before I was leaving to go to college so I had to turn it down. That band lived and died playing 3 Dog Night, stuff from the "Tommy" album, Led Zeplin, Abbey Road & Let It Be stuff....you get the idea. No Dad band going off to play THAT Holiday Inn Circuit.

BTW, In light of how well my College career turned out :facepalm: I have often regretted that I passed on that experience. (Of course my Parents would have murdered me in my sleep. :lol: I'm sure that both the good and bad of it would have been some memories of a lifetime.

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Out of curiosity, I'm wondering how many of you have played or are currently playing with a backbeat drummer, that being crucial to any decent rendition of Mustang Sally?


To be clear, a backbeat puts the snare ON 2 & 4 but equally important, takes the kick drum OFF 2 & 4. So many bands I hear - and sadly so many I auditioned with - keep that kick drum pounding on 1 2 3 4 all night . . . . like a HS marching band. That style of drumming takes so many old songs off the table because it pretty much eliminates the option of kicking with the band, as opposed to just keeping time. . . unless all the kicks fall somewhere on a quarter note pulse.


A backbeat also lends itself to an eighth note pulse and if that's your internal metronome, rather than quarter, music takes on a whole nuther groove.

 

 

If you mean what I think you mean, I agree. I'd put it this way....many bands play MS like it's a rock and roll tune. It's Not. I tell my guys (I guess this will sound racist to some) "try to forget your a white guy for the next 3 minutes" !!

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Things change, I guess. Back in 1972 I was invited to play bass for a band that was booked to tour Holiday Inns all over the country. Something like a four month deal. It was about a week before I was leaving to go to college so I had to turn it down. That band lived and died playing 3 Dog Night, stuff from the "Tommy" album, Led Zeplin, Abbey Road & Let It Be stuff....you get the idea. No Dad band going off to play THAT Holiday Inn Circuit.

BTW, In light of how well my College career turned out
:facepalm:
I have often regretted that I passed on that experience. (Of course my Parents would have murdered me in my sleep.
:lol:
I'm sure that both the good and bad of it would have been some memories of a lifetime.

 

 

That's sounded like a cool opportunity... but I imagine that circuit had changed dramatically by 1982... certainly by 1992. I know... I worked for a Holiday Inn in college in the 1990's. It would be hard to imagine touring bands at that time getting booked in the lounge.

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If you mean what I think you mean, I agree. I'd put it this way....many bands play MS like it's a rock and roll tune. It's Not. I tell my guys (I guess this will sound racist to some) "try to forget your a white guy for the next 3 minutes" !!

 

 

I've been asking three (now down to two) guys to do that for the next three HOURS. They grew up on metal . . . . it's an uphill battle.

 

The guy that got both sides to relate best, IMHO, is Sly.

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Things change, I guess. Back in 1972 I was invited to play bass for a band that was booked to tour Holiday Inns all over the country. Something like a four month deal. It was about a week before I was leaving to go to college so I had to turn it down. That band lived and died playing 3 Dog Night, stuff from the "Tommy" album, Led Zeplin, Abbey Road & Let It Be stuff....you get the idea. No Dad band going off to play THAT Holiday Inn Circuit.

BTW, In light of how well my College career turned out
:facepalm:
I have often regretted that I passed on that experience. (Of course my Parents would have murdered me in my sleep.
:lol:
I'm sure that both the good and bad of it would have been some memories of a lifetime.

 

Sometimes it pays to check out the local Holiday Inn after a show. That's how Roland Orzabal discovered Oleta Adams:

 

[video=youtube;CsiS8hij7Pk]

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