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Band Issues how to sovle them?


mumpfic1

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Well my band has been together for 2 years now. We have not had issues for the most part till now. We have me at 42, the drummer is 46 the other guitar player is 29 and our singer is 30 and the bass player is 56. We play rock covers from the 70's,80's,90's and today.

Here our some of the issues. The two biggest song choices and gig choices. Me and the other guitar player will play anywhere we can that will raise the exposure of the band. Example. We where offered and oppurtunity to play at a AA baseball game which I think would be great for the band as far as new people hearing us BUT our drummer and bass player shot it down because they didnt want to sell tickets btw the tickets would allow you to go to the game as well as the show before. They have turned down stuff to the point where my other guitar player wants to quit. If they feel its not paying alot they dont want to do it but I feel you gotta get out there so people know who the hell you are.

Then there is my bass player. He complains ALOT. About gig choices, song choices, skill level of the other guitar player and just everything. I cant stand the negativity its driving me out of my mind.The other guitar player wants to play newer stuff but is not practicing the stuff we already have enough. I really want this to work I will work as hard as I can but the Bass player and drummer tell me what they dont like about the other guitar player and the other guitar player tells me what he doesnt like about the bass player and drummmer.

I need the the guitar player he is solid when he wants to be, he is very good at the webstuff and booking and knows alot of people. The drummer and bass player own the Pa the practice space and the recording gear and are very good players when they are interested. I just feel like Im getting hit with all the {censored} and Im just curious as to how to solve this {censored}. Suggestions?

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For your first issue, here's how I'd solve it:

 

I wouldn't play a show where I had to sell tickets myself.

Period.

 

YMMV, and from your post, it seems you're willing to do that, but it would take a hell of a lot more for me to even consider doing so. Like "The band has to sell tickets and then they get a single appearance on David Letterman" or "Sell tickets but you're playing half-time at the Super Bowl".

 

For an appearance at a local AA ball team? Hell f*&king no.

Sounds like the team isn't trying to boost attendance by providing diversions such as live musical entertainment; they're trying to boost attendance by USING their entertainment as ticket salesmen.

 

Are you a musician or a ticket agent?

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Been there, done that! My band has been together for the same amount of time, but our turning point came a little earlier. We had a band member that was holding the rest of the band back by just not practicing or being available for gigs. (went months between practicing and had to cancel almost 20 gigs before all was said and done) Once he finally decided to leave, things perked up a bit. Then it took us five months to find a replacement (and all that time we played gigs with several different fill-ins/candidates) and that really solidified the band right there. So now when someone does something seriously stupid, I take a deep breath and remind myself of how good a situation I have with this band.

 

So at that end of it all my advice to you is this - take stock of the situation that you're in and decide if it's worth putting up with. If it is worth it, find ways (and you may have to be very creative and forgiving) to make things work.

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The answer to these sorts of problems is simple but not easy:

 

You all have to be on the same page with the direction of the band.

 

If you're looking for some sort of "well, look to see if they'll kick in a free hot dog for the guitar player" and it will make everything better---sorry, but there are no such easy solutions.

 

The only REAL solution is you have to sit everyone down and seriously talk about what kind of band you want to be, what kind of gigs you want to play, what your long term goals are, and how you want to get there. If you can't all agree, then some people need to leave the band and move on. (Maybe that's you; maybe that's some of the other guys.) Or, you decide that for the sake of just being a band and having fun, you drop all pretense of having 'goals' and just keep on doing what you've been doing and whoever is pushing to do more stops doing that.

 

But seriously, I'm not sure there are any other REAL solutions.

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I know this is more about your lineup than your 'exposure gig' choices... I can tell you the Golden Rule when it comes to choosing exposure gigs (paid, in trade or free)... if you are doing the gig to gain exposure then make sure it's targeted at your market audience. For instance, if you are a wedding band and you have an opportunity to pay $400 to play for potential brides, by all means that is a great exposure gig. If you are a nightclub band and your target audience is 21-30 singles crowd, playing at a Wal-Mart grand opening isn't really reaching your target market, is it? Playing for a AA baseball game might seem like decent exposure if you are playing to a few thousand (our local stadium seats 4500) but they are mostly a family events... maybe you could pick up a private party or two, but chances are people would remember your name by the time they reach their parked cars. They are there to see a baseball game... not catch a local cover band. I'm not saying it's the worst opportunity in the world... but I would want to do it either.

 

As guido said... you all need to be on the same page and sadly enough the rift in most bands has alot to do with age/motivation than anything else. People can differ in age, but you have to all share and want the same goals for the band. My band ranges in age from 44 to 23... and everything doesn't always go 'everyone's way'. There has been lots of compromise in this band, however we've always been on the same page when it came to goals and the sacrifices and committments we were required to make. Some members that didn't 'share that vision' and they are no longer with the band today.

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The answer to these sorts of problems is simple but not easy:


You all have to be on the same page with the direction of the band.


If you're looking for some sort of "well, look to see if they'll kick in a free hot dog for the guitar player" and it will make everything better---sorry, but there are no such easy solutions.


The only REAL solution is you have to sit everyone down and seriously talk about what kind of band you want to be, what kind of gigs you want to play, what your long term goals are, and how you want to get there. If you can't all agree, then some people need to leave the band and move on. (Maybe that's you; maybe that's some of the other guys.)
Or
, you decide that for the sake of just being a band and having fun, you drop all pretense of having 'goals' and just keep on doing what you've been doing and whoever is pushing to do more stops doing that.


But seriously, I'm not sure there are any other REAL solutions.

 

 

David you make some very good points. We really need to talk before I lose my mind. I feel like Im trying to keep the peace all the time and satisfy everybody for the greater good. I know what my goals are and I think the band has the same goals just not the same ideas of how to get there.

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Do something not music related (bbq party at someone's place?) and believe me, the issues will eventually surface during conversations.

 

Musicians are an elite group of humans. We're more obtuse and egotistical than the average human so use scruples when you deal with other musicians otherwise you'll drift further apart.

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I think band meeting is in order. Talk about everything, calmly and like adults. Don't do it at practice though. Somewhere else and hammer out a "plan."

 

If certain members are not on the same page, not willing to compromise or are not happy with the direction of the band the sooner they are replaced the better. We shelved our band for months and retooled after dropping our Female vocalist and guitar player.

 

as far as exposure gigs... Like Grant says it better be for the right audience or its worthless. I am dealing with this right now.

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I've said this a million itmes and I'll probably repeat it on my deathbed...

 

Whenever somebody offers me a low-paying or non-paying gig with the line that it's good exposure, my comeback is always...

 

"You know, you can die from exposure."

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I've said this a million itmes and I'll probably repeat it on my deathbed...


Whenever somebody offers me a low-paying or non-paying gig with the line that it's good exposure, my comeback is always...


"You know, you can die from exposure."

 

 

I use that one too.. :-)

 

As mentioned in earlier posts, it's a matter of not having the same goals and a plan for getting there. Where do you want to be 6 months down the road? 12 months, 5 years.. whatever.. and what needs to happen or not to get there.

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