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how often do you change your medleys?


jeff42

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This is a question to some of the bands that play a lot of medleys.

 

Grant's band and Jason's band do 'em and I am sure some others too. Just wondering how often if ever do you change up/add/subtract to your medleys to make them a little or even a lot different?

 

With a very large portion of our show being medleys we run the risk of it being predictable a little faster than some other bands in my area. It is also higher energy because of it so I guess there is the trade off.

 

-and is the predictability of what is coming next actually a bad thing? It seems some of our crowd likes knowing what's next and they react to the medley immediately and positively. If it is a medley that contains some killer tunes.

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We only do about 6 or 7 of 'em, but we add/subtract to them quite often. Especially the ones revolving around newer pop material. I use them largely as a vehicle to deliver a couple of verse/choruses of newer tunes without having to go into the whole piece.

 

But also we don't play for repeat audiences, so "predictability" isn't a concern for us one way or the other.

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Honestly... that's all we do. We are constantly shuffling the deck.... especially on current Top 40. Since a majority of our setlist are long extended medleys strung together whenever we add new songs we're always adding and subtracting from those medley's and balancing the songs that work, from the one's that don't work.

 

For instance a few weeks back we added Enrique Inglesias "Tonight" into a song medley that included Flo'Rida's "Club Can't Handle Me", Rihanna's 'Beautiful Girl', Usher's 'DJ's Falling In Love' and 'Raise Your Glass'. It lasted a week. We realized that the Rihanna & Flo'rida tunes weren't working anymore. So we dropped those and moved 'Raise Your Glass' infront of another medley.

 

And no... predictability is not a bad thing at all. In fact, on older, nostalgic material it's works, because it gives the regulars some familar ground to stand on while we change up the rest of the setlist. Some song transitions we haven't changed in years and the crowd starts singing before we hit the first note.

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