Jump to content

Our first gig is tomorrow night!


Kalebmation

Recommended Posts

  • Members

Hey guys,

 

I just wanted to make a quick post about my band Collecting Space and our first gig tomorrow night in Columbus, OH. I haven't played a show in a few years, and this is the first time I'll be on lead vocals for a whole set. I share lead guitar duties with a new guy in the band, and my keyboard player and drummer sing backing vocals. We had a six hour rehearsal on Sunday and sounded absolutely fantastic. We are also going to do a quick run-through of our set before our show. We have a 45 min. set of all originals. I've also got a brand new guitar rig that we are using for the first time. We are a five piece total with me on guitars/vocals, a guitar player, keyboard/bgv, bassist and drummer/bgv. I also write about 80-90% of the music.

 

I'd love to know what you think of our music - we play rock music inspired by 70's progressive rock (in a nutshell). I have two demos posted online that we recorded at my home studio up at our website, www.collectingspace.net

 

Thanks!

Kaleb

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

The music sounds great. Maybe it's the crappy computer speakers I am listening through, but I can't understand the vocals. On Subside they were somewhat comprehendable while the acoustic was playing, but when the full band came in and backing vocals were added it sounded muddy to me. On Within You, Without You I couldn't understand anything that was being sung. Like I said, maybe it's my cheap, little speakers I'm listening through (I'm at work so this is what I'm stuck with). The music sounds really tight. Good luck with the gig!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Good Luck!

 

I would go easy on the rehearsal before the gig. My band went all out right before a gig once and used up all of our energy. The performance the next day didn't live up to the rehearsal. Now if we meet right before a gig, we just do a run through of the song transitions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

Good Luck!


I would go easy on the rehearsal before the gig. ....

 

 

I agree! I don't like having a rehearsal the day BEFORE a show, much less the day OF the show, but YMMV. To the OP: Welcome back to the land of the gigging! Good Luck on the show!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

Good Luck!


I would go easy on the rehearsal before the gig. My band went all out right before a gig once and used up all of our energy. The performance the next day didn't live up to the rehearsal. Now if we meet right before a gig, we just do a run through of the song transitions.

 

 

+1. I've seriously strained my voice before rehearsing the night before a gig. Now I try to leave at least a couple of days in between.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Hey guys,


I just wanted to make a quick post about my band Collecting Space and our first gig tomorrow night in Columbus, OH. I haven't played a show in a few years, and this is the first time I'll be on lead vocals for a whole set. I share lead guitar duties with a new guy in the band, and my keyboard player and drummer sing backing vocals. We had a six hour rehearsal on Sunday and sounded absolutely fantastic. We are also going to do a quick run-through of our set before our show. We have a 45 min. set of all originals. I've also got a brand new guitar rig that we are using for the first time. We are a five piece total with me on guitars/vocals, a guitar player, keyboard/bgv, bassist and drummer/bgv. I also write about 80-90% of the music.


I'd love to know what you think of our music - we play rock music inspired by 70's progressive rock (in a nutshell). I have two demos posted online that we recorded at my home studio up at our website,
www.collectingspace.net


Thanks!

Kaleb

 

thats tolerable chillin music :thu:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Hey guys,


I just wanted to make a quick post about my band Collecting Space and our first gig tomorrow night in Columbus, OH. I haven't played a show in a few years, and this is the first time I'll be on lead vocals for a whole set. I share lead guitar duties with a new guy in the band, and my keyboard player and drummer sing backing vocals. We had a six hour rehearsal on Sunday and sounded absolutely fantastic. We are also going to do a quick run-through of our set before our show. We have a 45 min. set of all originals.
I've also got a brand new guitar rig that we are using for the first time
. We are a five piece total with me on guitars/vocals, a guitar player, keyboard/bgv, bassist and drummer/bgv. I also write about 80-90% of the music.


I'd love to know what you think of our music - we play rock music inspired by 70's progressive rock (in a nutshell). I have two demos posted online that we recorded at my home studio up at our website,
www.collectingspace.net


Thanks!

Kaleb

 

Recipe for disaster right there.....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

I was going to say, make sure you've tested the {censored} out of that new guitar rig before you step onstage and make sure you have a backup plan (even if it's just "yank my guitar cord out of my pedalboard and plug directly into the amp"). Maybe all those rehearsals aren't a bad idea if they're at stage volume (or close to it). I tend to worry more about my gear messing up than about screwing up the songs these days.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

The mix actually sounds like it was mixed by someone playing guitar. It is the sound they should hear at their performing position. It's not the sound the audience should be hearing. I seem to have an awareness of how the sound is different in different locations. (Might be the years of experience or Alzheimer's.) I don't mind someone going out to see how it sounds, but I hate it when it looks like that is what they're doing. Better to be seen checking out the women in the audience.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Wow, thanks for all the replies. I've been really busy... here's some pics from the show (they aren't the best ever...)

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/collectingspaceband/sets/72157627292873767/

 

My new rig is a Line 6 POD HD500 --> DT50 112 combo... worked absolutely flawlessly. Way less problems than I ever had with my various Mesa rigs + pedals. The other guitar player plays a Sovtek MIG --> Avatar 4x12 with a few pedals.

 

I actually mix the songs that way on purpose, I love how it sounds personally, and I've gotten many compliments on it. I guess it's all personal preference, though. I make music for me first, and if other people like it, that's great. If not, oh well. I am not out here to make a ton of money or make it big necessarily. Maybe that's a narcissistic philosophy, but I'm happy with the way it works out. The rehearsals that we did were at full stage volume. We aren't a super loud band, but the rig was flawless. We got a ton of compliments, and about 50-60 people were there, which was great. I forgot to mention, the reason we rehearsed so much was because the other guitar player is our newest member... he only played with us twice before our gig. Our next show is in a week from today.

 

I'm working on recording our debut record at home, and I'm also going to do a 5.1 mix as well. Thanks again for all the compliments and feedback guys!

 

Kaleb

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

I actually mix the songs that way on purpose, I love how it sounds personally, and I've gotten many compliments on it.

 

 

Okay. I have rcorded and mixed 4 full length CDs, a vinyl album, and produced 3 others. Not a ton of experience, but I do have some. I also run live sound. And I have to say, when I hear statements like this, I cringe. The truth is, the mix is a mess. The first song sounds like the listener is standing behind the stage at a show, listening to a monitor mix. If that's 'on purpose', you'd better get used to not selling very many songs. Seriously, why write lyrics for a song if you're going to mix it so you can't understand a word of it? So you've gotten ''many compliments on it." From whom? Your friends? Other bands? Try sending it to some radio indie stations or music reviewers. My guess is they'll have a different take. Friends and other bands are a terrible indicator of how good or bad something is. Here, you have a forum of total strangers, and almost every one of them is telling you the mix needs work. But you just seem to dismiss it out of hand. Okay, fine. But just realize that the people who go nowhere in music are the ones who argue for and defend their limitations and liabilities.

 

I'm not trying to be a dick, I'm trying to offer you some honest and constructive help. I think your songs are good, your performance is good, but the bad mix is killing it and going to hold you back, and ultimately any songs you put out are going to be tossed on a pile of unlistenable material that we all get from unknown bands. Get better at mixing, maybe consult a producer, and you'll go a lot farther. We all like to think, as writers and performers, that we can wear every hat in the process- recording engineer, mastering engineer, mixing engineer, graphic artist, marketing director, booking agent- and you know what? The person who can do all those things is rare. The one who can do them all well is almost non-existent. I learned enough doing this that on my last two records I collaborated with another producer, an objective set of ears who could make suggestions and help get a good product in spite of me. Good luck, I think you have lot of potential but you really need to fix this record. My $.02

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Have to agree with the above-hire someone to do another mix, someone with some experience. It will make a huge difference. I like the music. I made a record and did some pre mixes at home, then brought it into a studio and let a pro do the final mixes. His knowledge and skill taught me a lot-mostly that I knew nothing about mixing a record. I thought the mix on subside was better than the first tune.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

I actually mix the songs that way on purpose, I love how it sounds personally, and I've gotten many compliments on it. I guess it's all personal preference, though. I make music for me first, and if other people like it, that's great. If not, oh well.

 

 

If you're not making the music for other people, then why bother to make a "record"? Isn't the whole POINT of a record so that other people can enjoy your music?

 

I've worked with many mixing engineers over the years, and I've never worked with a single one who mixed either for himself or without the intended audience in mind. Back in the day, it was common to always give the mix a listen-through on a set of small speakers so as to hear what it would sound like through a car radio. Why? Because that was the engineer's preferred way of listening to music? No. Because it is important to make a record that sounds as good as possible to all potential listeners.

 

A guitarist who mixes the music with the guitar so much above the rest of the mix that the final result is unenjoyable to listen to? That's not just narcissistic. That's just bad engineering.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

The mix actually sounds like it was mixed by someone playing guitar. It is the sound they should hear at their performing position. It's not the sound the audience should be hearing. I seem to have an awareness of how the sound is different in different locations. (Might be the years of experience or Alzheimer's.)
I don't mind someone going out to see how it sounds, but I hate it when it looks like that is what they're doing.
Better to be seen checking out the women in the audience.

 

 

I have to ask WHY? I realize it looks a little unprofessional, but it does show that the band cares about how they sound and if they're too loud for the venue. IMHO, it's better to go out in the audience and have a listen than perform with really bad sound. It's easy to do if a member has a wireless set-up.

 

"Better to be seen checking out the women in the audience."

 

IDK, at some places, you'd look creepy, like a perv or something.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

IMHO, while the mix may not be as good as it could be ( both tunes ), the bigger problem maybe that it hasn't been professionally mastered. Good mastering will typically increase definition between instruments and vocals, add fidelity and a more spacious stereo sound. I am no pro audio guy, so I know that I need to employ a pro for mastering AT LEAST, if not mixing as well. I think the songs here are attempting to be "atmospheric" to some degree, sorta like some of the earlier Pink Floyd stuff. I listened on very good quality headphones, which should NOT to be used to mix or master, but are a good way to hear subtleties in the music. There is a lot going on, many guitars, synths, etc. So, the overall sound lacks definition, which good mastering could improve on. The vocal/s are are sung with a kind of dreamy quality and aren't very dynamic or punchy, which inhibits them from standing out more in the mix. One could raise the vocals volume, but then the vocals might be too upfront for the intended sound. If the OP plans on selling these tunes, perhaps he could have them pro mastered first and see if they require re-mixing. BTW, I found an online mastering lab that has an international client list and seems quite inexpensive. I'll pass along their info. FYI, I have yet to use their services but plan to in the near future. And I have NO connection with them whatsover. Also, usually, it is best to try to find a mastering lab locally that can get the results you want. One has more input that way. But online mastering services are becoming more popular and easier with drop box sites. Here's the link:

 

http://www.hotlinemastering.com/index.html

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

I have to ask WHY? I realize it looks a little unprofessional, but it does show that the band cares about how they sound and if they're too loud for the venue. IMHO, it's better to go out in the audience and have a listen than perform with really bad sound. It's easy to do if a member has a wireless set-up.


"Better to be seen checking out the women in the audience."


IDK, at some places, you'd look creepy, like a perv or something.

 

 

When you're performing, you're supposed to be interacting with the audience. You can multi-task a little and figure out what's happening out there while dancing with the babes. If I'm setting up, I've got no problem checking out the PA coverage in the place. I don't want the audience thinking that I'm forgetting about them while performing. During breaks, it's always good to interact with the customers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...