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Do you drink (not get drunk) at gigs?


guitarguy19

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I do get Kmart's point. Kinda like this. You have one person who says he doesn't want to steal anything because he's afraid of getting caught. Person number 2 says they don't want to steal because of the moral issues, etc. They both say they don't want to steal. If you had to leave your gear where one of them had access to it, which one would you choose?

 

 

He has no point. After pages of responses that have nothing to do with DUIs or Checkpoints save a handful., he jumps in with his mock concern about "all those responses". Which is demonstrably B.S. Then when called on it adopts the "who me" victim stance.

 

{censored} that guy with a rusty pole.

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He has no point. After pages of responses that have nothing to do with DUIs or Checkpoints save a handful., he jumps in with his mock concern about "all those responses". Which is demonstrably B.S. Then when called on it adopts the "who me" victim stance.


{censored} that guy with a rusty pole.

 

 

Thanks much for proving me right so clearly.

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I have the right to drink a couple beers or shots and drive. It's not illegal and it doesn't make me a bad driver. I have never had a DUI or failed to pass a roadblock, but I am not a bad or immoral person because I think of roadblocks as negative experiences- which they are (I don't think that teetotaling atheists particularly enjoy them, either). IMO roadblocks are nothing but fundraising and police harrassment BS. The resources invested in roadblocks could be put to put to better use and intercept more drunk drivers, by observing drivers who are actually driving erratically or poorly.

If kmart was born without a penis, I'm sure he would have some choice comments in the groupie threads.:poke:

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We keep going back and forth, round and round on this issue. We've got a couple of people in the band who LIKE to drink and sometimes---especially during one of those corporate/wedding gigs where we set up and then don't start playing for a couple of hours---they can be a little too drunk by the time we go on stage. So we try to stick to a fairly strict "no drinking" rule.

But there are always exceptions. For example, we played a private party at a nice little winery a few months back and it was "open bar" for everyone--band included--for some REALLY nice wines. Now how often do you come across an open bar situation where they are pouring from $50/60 bottles of wine? Can anyone REALLY be expected to say no to THAT?

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I guess the drink/not to drink thing comes down to how many bucks they're paying you and what is riding on the gig. If you're making good money and you've been booked to entertain, then no one in the band should drink more than a couple of beers really. I don't buy all this "I can't get into it if I haven't had a few beers" stuff off guitarists I've played with.

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I guess the drink/not to drink thing comes down to how many bucks they're paying you and what is riding on the gig. If you're making good money and you've been booked to entertain, then no one in the band should drink more than a couple of beers really. I don't buy all this "I can't get into it if I haven't had a few beers" stuff off guitarists I've played with.

 

And drummers. I agree. If people are paying you, you are there to work for your money. Not get smashed and have a party of your own.

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Last weekend was the "perfect storm" for me, for getting carried away drinking- hadn't touched a drop for a week, my band needed a sub drummer and I enlisted my best friend/drinking buddy, my GF dumping me, the familiar faces at my old stomping ground close to home pouring shots, all these "triggers". But other than slopping a couple notes on SHA solo at the end of the night (which is unacceptable to me but the world didn't come to an end), I played well and the band had a good weekend. Still I put myself on notice to rein it in.

 

And then I'm informed that ANOTHER big club 5 minutes from home, a first-time venue for us, is booking us for the next 2 full weekends. It turns out that the club has changed it's name to go with a country format. And the new name? (drum roll): WHISKEY RIVER (groan). You just can't get away from it. Sometimes I suspect a connection between the country/southern rock genre and alcohol.

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Just an observation, but the number of responses indicating that people aren't drinking at gigs because they fear DUI tickets or checkpoints vs the number that indicate people fear driving while intoxicated/potentially not having all their faculties available is a little troubling to me, considering I'm sharing those same roads after my gigs...

 

 

The checkpoint excuse is bull{censored}.

 

By the time you're done packing gear, getting paid, and doing a "dummy check" to make sure nothing gets left behind, sobriety checkpoints have long been over. Even the places we play that are notorious for cops hiding nearby grabbing people as they leave....By the time we're out of there, they have been gone for a while.

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