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Starting a Trio of Top 40 Songs?


xtianmind

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I am looking to start a trio. 1 guitarist, 1 keys, and 1 drummer?

 

I sing, and play the keys, the guitarist sings, and the drummer.

 

would this work?

 

I was thinking of playing the bass on the keyboard?

Would this be acceptable?

 

What is the average pay per person per trio?

 

We are all of age 23. We will learn most Top 40 songs, plus some older songs.

 

Any advice? We live around the Los Angeles Area, closer to Orange County.

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I am looking to start a trio. 1 guitarist, 1 keys, and 1 drummer?


I sing, and play the keys, the guitarist sings, and the drummer.


would this work?


I was thinking of playing the bass on the keyboard?

Would this be acceptable?


What is the average pay per person per trio?


We are all of age 23. We will learn most Top 40 songs, plus some older songs.


Any advice? We live around the Los Angeles Area, closer to Orange County.

 

 

Your proposed lineup has the potential to be a killer . . . if you can pull it off. A lot depends on the complexity of the material. If you have the chops to sing, play keys, and articulate bass lines, more power to you. I've done it, but never as the primary vocalist. Can the guitar player sing lead on songs that require more from you technically?

 

If you're asking if the sound of LH bass will cut it, the answer is yes if you have a good board, split your signal, have sufficient amplification and use real bass speakers.

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Pick some good music you guys can convincingly pull off and I think you will be fine. what ever you do... do it well and SELL your act!

 

My side project is a trio and we are doing pretty well. It is different than what you propose but it is also different from other "power trios" its an acoustic guitar, a small E-drum kit and bass guitar. All 3 of us sing. We play mainly modern pop and 90s pop. We break down some rap and r&b stuff too which give it a sort of novelty approach.

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Your proposed lineup has the potential to be a killer . . . if you can pull it off. A lot depends on the complexity of the material. If you have the chops to sing, play keys, and articulate bass lines, more power to you. I've done it, but never as the primary vocalist. Can the guitar player sing lead on songs that require more from you technically?


If you're asking if the sound of LH bass will cut it, the answer is yes if you have a good board, split your signal, have sufficient amplification and use real bass speakers.

 

 

Unfortunately I am one of the primary vocalist. At least with the most experience. But I was practicing a few songs, and I feel like I can pull it off. With some songs. Some other songs are a bit more complex like you said. Do you think it would be a bad idea to modify the songs a bit if it was the last resort?

 

Maybe trade the lead keys to a guitar solo type? While I play the piano, as rhythm guitar style?

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Unfortunately I am one of the primary vocalist. At least with the most experience. But I was practicing a few songs, and I feel like I can pull it off. With some songs. Some other songs are a bit more complex like you said. Do you think it would be a bad idea to modify the songs a bit if it was the last resort?


Maybe trade the lead keys to a guitar solo type? While I play the piano, as rhythm guitar style?

 

 

You'll get different opinions on this. I used to play Hendrix and Cream with a B3/drums duo! One theory says that the two most important chairs are lead vocals and drums - the "voice" of signature lines is less important.

 

Give us a link to a song you have in mind.

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You'll get different opinions on this. I used to play Hendrix and Cream with a B3/drums duo! One theory says that the two most important chairs are lead vocals and drums - the "voice" of signature lines is less important.


Give us a link to a song you have in mind.

 

 

I have not tried to sing and play this song yet. But if you guys can do it, I can probably do it. :b Maybe in the parts that I don't sing I can do the sound, and the guitar can take over when I start singing?

 

But don't want to trip over my keyboard. I love the sound.

 

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I would love to play in this format, with digital drums and no stage amps just have everything run through the sund system. Too bad you are in L.A. .... good luck.

 

 

This is exactly our set up. keys, guitar, and e-drums.

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I have not tried to sing and play this song yet. But if you guys can do it, I can probably do it. :b Maybe in the parts that I don't sing I can do the sound, and the guitar can take over when I start singing?


But don't want to trip over my keyboard. I love the sound.

 

 

I'll bet you could cover bass/keys/vocal with practice. Learn the lyrics cold. Then practice both hands w/out vocals until it's second nature. Then put them together.

 

Listen to the song slowed down. That helps me a lot.

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One theory says that the two most important chairs are lead vocals and drums - the "voice" of signature lines is less important.

 

 

That's always been my theory---that the best bands would have been able to sell their songs just with the drums and the vocal. If you got a great beat and a great vocal on top, the rest is just filler and gravy.

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I'll bet you could cover bass/keys/vocal with practice. Learn the lyrics cold. Then practice both hands w/out vocals until it's second nature. Then put them together.


Listen to the song slowed down. That helps me a lot.

 

 

If you say I can do it, I know I can. Thank you.

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That's always been my theory---that the best bands would have been able to sell their songs just with the drums and the vocal. If you got a great beat and a great vocal on top, the rest is just filler and gravy.

 

 

This is very true, as I have done it plenty of times.

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For a group this size, and given the type of music the vocals have to absolutely shine. It's pretty much the primary part of the band since there is so little instrumentation. I could absolutely see it work. I imagine the guitarist is playing acoustic right? They heavier you attack these songs the more vulnerable your production will sound. There's an acoustic duo in my area, two terrific singers, one plays acoustic, the other stage piano and play largely top 40 stuff. Great small/club bar stuff.

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I see it two conflicting ways.

 

A 3-piece originals band can make it, sure- It requires writing instrument parts that are more layered and filling. I read a terrific piece about how guitarists write their guitar lines in 1-guitar bands to be more spacious and some of the technical aspects behind that. I've played in 3-piece bands before and there's a huge potential for empty spaces to appear, and writing has everything to do with it.

 

BUT.. you are saying a top-40 band, so I'm assuming you are talking about a cover band? In that case, you are trying to duplicate more instruments with less people, and I see that as a fail. Especially if you are also going to be focused on lead vocals as well. Most cover tunes weren't written to be performed by 3-piece bands. I might assume you want only 3 because it's more $$ at gigs, or a friendship thing where you guys just don't want a new member.. who knows. A lot of clubs around here got wise to that and now pay guarantees on a 'per player' rate. One place we play pays $100 per man, regardless if you are a duo or a 7-piece.

 

It almost goes without saying that you will reproduce covers much better with a 4-piece- at least most covers.

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with a three piece like listed they will need to add a bit of creativity to what they are covering. If they do it right I think it could work well.

 

My side project Ostrich Hat for example is working well. In the past year we creeped up our price and our crowds while not huge have been constant. Part of the draw I think is we are doing stuff that most acoustic based bands don't touch.- Lots of recent top 40, r&b, Rap and 90s pop. The songs are stripped down and re-worked and that is some of the fun.

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I see it two conflicting ways.


A 3-piece originals band can make it, sure- It requires writing instrument parts that are more layered and filling. I read a terrific piece about how guitarists write their guitar lines in 1-guitar bands to be more spacious and some of the technical aspects behind that. I've played in 3-piece bands before and there's a huge potential for empty spaces to appear, and writing has everything to do with it.


BUT.. you are saying a top-40 band, so I'm assuming you are talking about a cover band? In that case, you are trying to duplicate more instruments with less people, and I see that as a fail. Especially if you are also going to be focused on lead vocals as well. Most cover tunes weren't written to be performed by 3-piece bands. I might assume you want only 3 because it's more $$ at gigs, or a friendship thing where you guys just don't want a new member.. who knows. A lot of clubs around here got wise to that and now pay guarantees on a 'per player' rate. One place we play pays $100 per man, regardless if you are a duo or a 7-piece.


It almost goes without saying that you will reproduce covers much better with a 4-piece- at least
most
covers.

 

 

Disagree.

 

Let's start with the fact that the bass player and keyboard player are always on the same page. If you're playing heavily synocapted funk, yeah that's a lot harder, but most modern pop doesn't strike me as technically challenging.

 

The vocals have to be strong . . . but that's in every band. The trio I left a couple months ago - same format - had drumming and vocal harmony issues. If I may say so, my left hand was not an issue.

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