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what do you play for sound check?


dfwadjuster

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If you mean individual
level
checks, we all have our own riffs that we play.

 

 

If we're talking about this, I usually just whack some random chords and individual notes at the higher and lower ends of my volume spectrum. I want to get an idea form the soundperson whether or not I need adjust my volume or tone, first and foremost.

 

If we're talking abuot a whole song, it's usually whichever one has the loudest dynamic range and uses the most "bells and whistles" in general.

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KKKK|KKKK|KKkKK|KKkKK (repeat as needed)

SSSS|SSSS|SSsSS|SSsSS (repeat as needed)

HHHH|HHHH|HHhHH|HHhHH (repeat as needed)

FFFF|FFFF|FFfFF|FFfFF (repeat as needed)

eDrumeDrumeDrumeDum|eDrumeDrumeDrumeDrum|eDrumeDrumeeDrumeDrum|eDrumeDrumeeDrumeDrum (repeat as needed)

 

 

 

Followed by a few basic full kit rhythms moving from hats to ride, across toms, etc.

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I usually shoot off a quick 'Eruption' before gliding into 'Flight Of The Bumble Bee".....:rawk:

 

Just joking of course. I'll just blast a few barre chords, a couple jazzy ninth chords and a quick lead run or two. When I was leading my own group we would often play 'Knocking On Heaven's Door' for a warmup/sound check because it's quick, easy, open to a little noodling and overall a throwaway unless requested.

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Let me take this opportunity to ask those playing melodic instruments...

 

When doing individual level checks, is there a particular reason it seems, at least in my observation, that you are adverse to playing through patches/settings representative of the sounds you'll be making in performance?

 

For example, a guitarist playing his/her go-to dirty and clean, and maybe even that one weird delay patch in close approximation to how they'll be performing later during the actual show?

Not necessarily playing the SONGS they'll be playing, but close enough for the soundman to get dialed in with what's in store?

 

Seems to me like it's exceptionally common that I'll see a situation where the guitarist gets called on for a level check, and the guy immediately whips into Sweet Child of Mine, You Shook Me, Eruption, etc. whatever to make a 'guitar show!!!" out of things, even though the band doesn't play songs in that general style...

Similarly, the bass player who busts out the intro to the Chili Peppers' version of Higher Ground when that's not played, and the band doesn't specialize in funk-rock, etc.

 

Seems to kind of be missing the point; shouldn't the goal to be not only to get 'a' signal, but also dial in the desired sound for the gig itself?

 

Responses that appear semi-serious above thus far lead me to believe I'm not just imagining things...

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Let me take this opportunity to ask those playing melodic instruments...


When doing individual level checks, is there a particular reason it seems, at least in my observation, that you are adverse to playing through patches/settings representative of the sounds you'll be making in performance?

 

I don't know, but that's pretty much exactly what I do. :idk:

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For individual levels we go through parts of our songs that run through the dynamic range we will using specifically. For the whole band, we will always improv something. I can improvise lyrics well and will come up with something that repeats so everyone can check their mics. The horns will improv a line that they end up playing together which is something I always marvel at, and everyone will take a solo. It takes about 5-6 minutes and more often than not we get a new song idea out of it, so we are usually recording our sound checks. We got in the habit of doing this because as an original band we sometimes have to sound check in front of the crowd we are playing for and I always hate going "Ok here's that song you heard half of earlier..."

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After setting the drums, then adding bass to the mix, the bass player will usually lock in with the drummer on something, whatever they feel like at the time and once they are balanced I add my guitar channels in and then add a little vocal stuff with each member singing a few lines to make sure they are at the right level above the music. We rearely play an actual song, especially a song that we have on the set lists for the night. A possible exception is if the room is pretty much empty at the time of sound check.

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Let me take this opportunity to ask those playing melodic instruments...


When doing individual level checks, is there a particular reason it seems, at least in my observation, that you are adverse to playing through patches/settings representative of the sounds you'll be making in performance?


For example, a guitarist playing his/her go-to dirty and clean, and maybe even that one weird delay patch in close approximation to how they'll be performing later during the actual show?

...

it seems silly that you would sound check with tones that you won't even be using for the show.

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What is this "soundcheck" of which you speak?

 

- or -

 

The first song is the soundcheck. We're usually "dialed in" by the first chorus.

 

When operating out of a venue that provides sound and audio tech, I give what the sound person asks for. If I'm the bass player, I just thump some 1/8 notes in A, maybe a 2.5 octave D major pentatonic descending run. If I'm the drummer, whatever I'm asked for ("Kick"...."OK, snare..." "OK, first tom..." etc), then the intro to Take Five.

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What is this "soundcheck" of which you speak?


- or -


The first song is the soundcheck. We're usually "dialed in" by the first chorus.


When operating out of a venue that provides sound and audio tech, I give what the sound person asks for. If I'm the bass player, I just thump some 1/8 notes in A, maybe a 2.5 octave D major pentatonic descending run. If I'm the drummer, whatever I'm asked for ("Kick"...."OK, snare..." "OK, first tom..." etc), then the intro to Take Five
.

that IS a sound check.

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We typically do line checks and use the first song to fine tune things.

 

On those rare occasions where we get a full-fledged soundcheck, we usually do a couple minutes of Dishwalla's Counting Blue Cars.

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We typically do line checks and use the first song to fine tune things.


On those rare occasions where we get a full-fledged soundcheck, we usually do a couple minutes of Dishwalla's
Counting Blue Cars
.

we do that song occasionally. Do you have it in your set lists?

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on piano - I will typically just play some chords and maybe a few honky tonk type of riffs to get a quick line check. Sometimes if the sound guy wants more to dial in some tone for a particular venue I will play something by Elton John. Primarily because it annoys the lead singer who hates Elton :thu:

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We try to do 1 verse of a song that each singer does that are not in the set list that night.

 

We do keyboard/lead vocalist, first and bass player/vocalist, second so I can be out front and listen. during this time I listen to all levels and have players adjust accordingly.

 

When it's time to do my song, bassist goes out and listens. By that time, the music levels should be pretty well set and he is basically listening to my vocal level (I am second lead) in relation to key/vocalist's vocal level.

 

It's not perfect, but it seems to work.

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That WORKS- my last band did that very well.

 

 

 

It took a long time to get the whole band on board. What worked was I began taping performances and recording as soon as the we got the back line setup. Then I would send the recordings out... not of the set performance, but of all the noodling, senseless jamming and tweaking in between. It became apparent that we were assault the audience before a single song was played. Sometimes we be playing something inspired but most times it was a total train wreck. Hearing the guitarist shred scales senselessly for 2-3 minutes as a warmup was ebough to shame him to invest in headphones and a Pocket POD.

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