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Streaming killed...


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giving away our music. I'm not mourning this. It used to be, a way to get folks to listen was to give them a legal way to do so for free. But now, you can have listen to just about anything you want, whenever you want. The advantage just isn't there.

 

Now, we were extra overboard with it, and gave away CD's for shipping, and like a bowl of Halloween candy at shows. We scaled back on that. Then, because our merchandise was lacking, I thought, why not sell this album? It's certainly good enough, and we are good enough to sell our music on our live show.

 

We have some logistics figure out before we pull the download, but I think we're headed in that direction. We'll see how this goes.

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yea I can stream music over 4G no problem in the US and I'm on AT&T. People regularly pull up my webiste and play my tunes right after I hip them to it. Selling music is over..It's just FLAT OVER. The only means left are merchandise, specialty things like Vinyl releases and gig $$...

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Less and less so. It's going to be a trickle that whithers down to nothing. Not anywhere near the reliable income stream it used to be. Better to make one killer video and rease singles if you're trying to have an artist career now because the potential exposure from said video is far more than you'll get in sales. Make the ep and put it up on spotify and link from your Webaite to Bandcamp where you can sell the entires thing uncompressed to the faithful for $2.99. If you have a fan base you can cover your expenses this way and help build the tribe. Of your music is great your business will increase, you'll sell more merchant and EPs at your shows and so on and so on. Such a different business these days but nothing stays the same forever:)

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As a primary source of income, it's over already. But I don't think music sales will go much farther down than they have. There's still some room for Spotify to grow, but I think you're already about down to only the "music people" who are buying albums.

 

Spotify is great, but I think it is also shining a spotlight on the intangible deficiencies of digital music. Yes, you can listen top anything you want for free or cheap. It's awesome. But it makes it too easy to move on to the next thing. It really trivializes the listening experience.

 

Vinyl is the antithesis of streaming, and I think it's no coincidence that its renaissance is picking up so much steam now.

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And to update, we opened for Trapt last night and sold about 10 albums. Not paying anybody's bills, but certainly worth selling instead of handing them out for free. To still be doing so would just be redundant at this point.

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SLScott86 wrote:

 

As a primary source of income, it's over already. 

 

 

I'm 30 now.. I remember when I was 14 or so and talking with some folks in Nashville.. the prevailing thought was that an artist isn't getting his or her bread and butter from record sales, from the indy folks to the major label folks. 

 

I can't imagine that situation has gotten any better...

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The only ones who well bother making physical albums is people who want a memento to sell to fans... and with the live performance and merch-reliant nature of this new model, that's, you know, pretty much everyone.

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Even when they were free, the download cards didn't generate much interest. I don't know why that is.

 

I do see very little harm in playing ball with streaming. I think people want to stick to their familiar channels. People are expecting a way to try before they buy, and they'll want to do that using their preferred channels.

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guido61 wrote:

 

Am I being overly optimistic to imagine a day when recorded music becomes so value-less that nobody bothers anymore and live music becomes the preferred way to consume original material?

 

Yes.  I don't think that will ever happen entirely.  It may move in that direction, but people need to hear it in their cars, at home, on their iThings to become somewhat familiar, right?

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guido61 wrote:

 

Am I being overly optimistic to imagine a day when recorded music becomes so value-less that nobody bothers anymore and live music becomes the preferred way to consume original material?

 

 

yes.  People love original music, especially catchy stuff.  Looking closer at the last two original bands that 'blew my mind', one I saw live first, the other I caught a blip of their recorded stuff frist, then looked them up.

With the live first band, I had a couple of the riffs caught in my head, I wanted to hear the songs again.  Would I wait for them to come back to town just to hear the song?  Nahh.  I went home, logged into amazon, and bought both their initial EP and their full-length album.

The second band, I'd have died to see live, but they split up, so I was left with two albums to purchase online, and a ton of youtube live stuff, which I sorted out the best live performances and hijacked the audio from.

In the second case, streaming (youtube) did play a part, but in every case, I needed to have the studio releases, and purchased them without pause.

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