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What's the best way to find a new band today?


WynnD

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People are always looking for bands to work with or musicians to fill a slot. I know about Craigslist.org Is there anywhere else that works pretty good? AFM? (Haven't been a member in decades, but I don't have a problem with them or Unions in particular.) It's starting to feel like another fairly rational volume band has gone off the deep end in favor of the louder must be better attitude. (Where does that come from? You don't learn it from playing to audiences that avoid getting close.)

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WynnD wrote:

 

People are always looking for bands to work with or musicians to fill a slot. I know about Craigslist.org Is there anywhere else that works pretty good? AFM? (Haven't been a member in decades, but I don't have a problem with them or Unions in particular.) It's starting to feel like another fairly rational volume band has gone off the deep end in favor of the louder must be better attitude. (Where does that come from? You don't learn it from playing to audiences that avoid getting close.)

 

I think it starts with dragging out way more gear than you need to turn the gig and way too much stage volume with the volume war that soon starts.  

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Haven't quit yet and won't walk out without notice. (That's just not right.) Over the years I've left a number of bands that just kept getting louder. The first one, I realized that my Leslie couldn't be heard in the audience anymore. (Those 30' cables are good for playing out where the audience would be in a gig.) In that case the guitarist got a Super Reverb with JBL speakers and the bassist got a Traynor 320 watt tube bass amp with a single 18" speaker in a folded horn cabinet. Both were incredibly loud. (And clear, don't forget clear.) It's frustrating. I'm working with some great musicians who don't have a problem with lower volumes. Seems only the singer is pushing for more and more. (And has the full support of people who think I'm able but unwilling to give him more. The guy has the best voice I've ever worked with. Don't want to hide that. I just can't give him anymore without running into feedback and tweaking won't make that problem go away. Got too much pride in what I do to accept some feedback.)

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I think it starts with dragging out way more gear than you need to turn the gig and way too much stage volume with the volume war that soon starts.  

I've had more gear than I can fit into my mini-van and trailer for quite some time. There is a reason that volume knobs turn two ways. Volume wars might be fun for some, but they've never been fun for me. Unless I'm willing to invest in new Leslies, those are never going to win a volume war. (Got a 760 and 825. 165 watts total. Most 25 watt guitar amps will stomp that.) In some ways, they have been a limiting factor for my volume. (Not that I enjoy running them full out.)

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I'd pull the feedback filters. What's that about? It might be notching out a bunch if frequencies, making them want more which in turn pushes things close to feeding back.

 

My monitors, on each I trim a little bit off the highs. Do you set your gains and then bring the sliders to where you need them for the mix, or do you set all your channel sliders at unity and then bring up the gains to set the mix?

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I long ago decided that if the leslie's weren't loud enough, that the band was too loud for me to bother with. I can keep up with this band, but the feedback is my problem. Hiring a sound engineer is probably the best suggestion. Gotta admit that with 7 people, one more isn't much of a pay cut. Wonder if we can find someone willing to tolerate people who won't take him seriously when he says that's all there is so the band needs to back off. (And wouldn't they be surprised to find out that is the same level I was happy working at. I really don't see anything changing much. Too many mics and too high a volume. Perfect conditions for feedback.)

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You'd be surprised how often i see those huge ass bass cabinets and 100-watt guitar amp heads. Always reminds me of the meme's you see on Facebook of the tiny redneck driving the massively jacked-up pickup..... 'Sorry 'bout your ****, bro'!

 

My solution as frontman/sound man/person who gets yelled out when the mix isn't right, was to invest in my own backbone for my band. I own an Egnater Tourmastet with variable wattage from 10-100 and it weighs a metric ton so it just sits in the studio and never goes above 10 watts, so I'm in the process of purchasing 2 Egnater Tweaker 15's, one of the Ampeg Mini Bass Rigs, and am considering converting an acoustic kit to e-drums. Once we get there, we'll go IEMs and hopefully my guys will leave the FOH mix alone by blowing their own eardrums, instead of the audiences.

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Well, I don't want to steer this thread in the wrong direction but. I love  high wattage bass amplifiers. As a bassist myself, I still think that bass players can benefit from lots of watts. Or I should say, bands can benefit from them. But the bass player needs to have a sense of perspective. There is nothing better than playing at an appropriate volume and being able to boost 40 Hz to the right level because of your headroom. Bass players need those watts and at least a 410 cabinet. They just have to have a good out front perspective. They have to know where the kick is and how their instrument blends with it. That can take a seemingly in ordinate amount of wattage and speakers to fulfill the requirement. I've played with guitarists that are using 10 want tube amplifiers and I'm still using my 350 W 210 and 115 configuration. If I need it it's there if I don't I won't.

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True enough. I use a 100W JCM800 through a 212 cab but I'm definitely not too loud. I use a Boss ME5 for my effects. The other guitar player is reasonable. The only one I have to get after is the keys player. I have to remind her it's not lead keyboards and she has to get used to sitting in the mix. No problem for songs where she plays leads, just the ones where she is in the background.

 

:)

 

 

Good luck!

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WynnD wrote:

 

People are always looking for bands to work with or musicians to fill a slot. I know about Craigslist.org Is there anywhere else that works pretty good? AFM? (Haven't been a member in decades, but I don't have a problem with them or Unions in particular.) It's starting to feel like another fairly rational volume band has gone off the deep end in favor of the louder must be better attitude. (Where does that come from? You don't learn it from playing to audiences that avoid getting close.)

 

how is bandmix in your area? How about the bulletin boards at your local music stores? How about posting it on your FB page if you have one?

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I am fascinated by guitar amps... probably have too many.  I tried a 5 watter once (Blackstar HT 5) and it just didn't cut it.  Usually I use an old Boogie, which with a boosts, sounds great at lower volumes.  Stil though.. I can easily see myself going direct with something like a POD HD 500 for cover band stuff.  All I need is clean, semi dirty, lead tone and something like the POD would cover all the effects (chorus, delay, univibe). 

Still though... I'm looking into something like a Suhr Badger 18 just because I want to check it out.  :)

 

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I always make sure I have a centerfill with some vocals, for those people right in front of the stage. And like you said, the guitars and stage bleed fill in that area with stage volumes, ill usually stand about 10' in front of the stage and judge the volumes from there, and the mix between the right and left guitars.

 

I'll see your POD and raise you a vintage Boss ME5, which is still used for every gig!

 

http://i1187.photobucket.com/albums/z398/robare99/98B9AE04-285F-4D56-BC59-0EF3C666BC01-7811-000006A698C6F2E6.jpg

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What a great tool right there! Boy that's seen a few gigs huh?

----------------

 

I bought that ME5 brand new in 1998. Retired her last year after a 300lb+ guy accidentally sat on it. We were playing a private company party gig in a tent. Free booze, everyone was having a helluva good time.

 

He was dancing around, oh 6'4 if I had to guess, big oilfield guy. He kinda trips, falls back.

 

Boom

 

Sits right on my ME5. I gigged that thing for 25 years, and it finally met its match. It kept on working, but I lost most of the functions etc. I paid $1200 for it new in 1988. I bought a replacement off eBay for $75 shipped. I was able to transfer all my patches over via MIDI, and I'm off to the races.

 

Here's a pic of old glory, with the bend.

 

http://i1187.photobucket.com/albums/z398/robare99/D0AA9EA2-399A-4B5E-B239-DA36BD21D96E-22184-00000F0FFA8C9037.jpg

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StratGuy22 wrote:

 

What a great tool right there! Boy that's seen a few gigs huh?

 

----------------

 

 

 

I bought that ME5 brand new in 1998. Retired her last year after a 300lb+ guy accidentally sat on it. We were playing a private company party gig in a tent. Free booze, everyone was having a helluva good time.

 

 

 

He was dancing around, oh 6'4 if I had to guess, big oilfield guy. He kinda trips, falls back.

 

 

 

Boom

 

 

 

Sits right on my ME5. I gigged that thing for 25 years, and it finally met its match. It kept on working, but I lost most of the functions etc. I paid $1200 for it new in 1988. I bought a replacement off eBay for $75 shipped. I was able to transfer all my patches over via MIDI, and I'm off to the races.

 

 

 

Here's a pic of old glory, with the bend.

 

 

 


 

 

LOL.. Holy crap! I don't I've ever heard a story quite like that.  

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I recently saw an 80's hair metal cover band, and their guitar and bass tones were thunderous.....great, great tones.    Judging by the guitarist's FOH tone, I was *positive* he had a finely-tuned Mesa Dual Rectifier half stack cranked up with at least two mics on it....but when I got close and examined their backline, there were no amps anywhere....just powered monitors.  Not even a pedalboard.  

Then I peeked around behind the mains and discovered the source of all these great tones I was hearing:   on each side of the stage was Macbook Pro running Guitar RIg....one for guitar, one for bass.  

 

Really opened my eyes to the possibilities that are out there these days.   As a rock-oriented guy who has been gigging for 25+ years, I'm having a hard time coming to grips with the idea of dumping my 50-watt head with 2x12 cabinet and full pedalboard.....but this guy had one of the best live tones I've ever heard from a club band.  And he can carry his entire rig in one hand, and his setup/teardown time is probably somewherein the neighborhood of two minutes.

I don't know if I'm ready to completely abandon the traditional rig....but I suspect I will be taking a long test-drive with a software solution in the very near future.

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n9ne wrote:

 

Then I peeked around behind the mains and discovered the source of all these great tones I was hearing:   on each side of the stage was Macbook Pro running
Guitar RIg
....one for guitar, one for bass. 

 

 

As I've stated, I'm a fan of classic gear with great tone, set appropriately for the venue, genre, and band. I'm not a fan of modeling except for its convenience. Then I tried Guitar Rig.

 

I can always get a sound that is perfect. It always sounds perfect. I will say though, forget the presets. Roll your own. The presets are designed to get you hooked, but not necessarily designed to fit into an arrangement. Build it from the ground up, making your settings make sense step by step. Choose your head type, then the cab, the mic or mics, the distance. Then put some pedals (in software) in front. Then use some studio processing (in software) on the output.

 

It's a really fantastic piece of gear.

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