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Least favourite thing about gigging


sologrrl

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Go.

 

Mine is how after a gig I am so wired. I love the adrenaline and fun times I have while playing but it really sucks to get home and take a hour or two to settle down enough to sleep (physically and mentally). Especially when you have to get up ridiculously early. For example, tonight I played till 2. After tear down, packing up and traffic I got home at 3. I have to get up at 7 a.m. tomorrow to go to a conference for my day job. It's not optional. :facepalm:

 

What is your least favourite part about doing a gig outside the normal stuff (not getting paid, empty bar, retarded bar tab etc)?

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I am not a social person. I love performing, and I am probably more dependent on crowd response than most people. But when I am not performing, I really don't want to socialize. I just want to go sit somewhere and relax. It makes me feel really guilty, but I just want to be left alone. I entertain in a place and circumstances I would never choose to be in as a customer. I have trouble relating to those who sit for hours drinking. I have never allowed myself that luxury of time.

 

Also, the cigarette smoke. My usual gig is at a restaurant that has a private drinking club. The smoke is oppressive. Last night, I went back out to my car after I got home, and it still reeked from me sitting in the seat for my ten minute drive home. I can usually smell the smoke the next morning. There have been times that the smell from my clothes has woken me up from across the room. I had to get up and put them outside for the night.

 

I don't have much problem relaxing after the show. Often, like last night, I sing for 3-4 hours, and I am pretty beat afterward.

 

oldMattB

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The least favorite part about gigging is tearing down and packing up the equipment when I'm done.

 

It's a little like making a holiday meal.

Not enjoyable, but on the other hand, not bad either. Just part of the process. I call it speakercise

 

But you asked for least favorite part.

 

Insights and incites by Notes ?

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it really sucks to get home and take a hour or two to settle down enough to sleep (physically and mentally).

 

 

That "cool down" time is all part of the gigging "process". When you were born, I had already been gigging almost 20 years (yes, I'm a bit of a geezer), but I still need some time to wind down, especially after a really good gig.

 

It sounds goofy, but what really helps me wind down after a gig are the heated seats in my car. No joke. The heat from the seat helps me relax on the drive home. Although, if you get too relaxed while driving, you can get into a whole 'nother set of issues........... ;-)

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The least favorite part about gigging is tearing down and packing up the equipment when I'm done.


It's a little like making a holiday meal.

  • Setting up the equipment is like preparing the ingredients and preparing the meal. It's work but the sweet anticipation of the meal (or music) is enough to make the work enjoyable

  • Performing is like eating the delicious meal - delightful

  • Tearing down the equipment is like cleaning the mess after the meal. Not enjoyable but the price paid for having so much fun.


Not enjoyable, but on the other hand, not bad either. Just part of the process. I call it speakercise


But you asked for least favorite part.


Insights and incites by Notes ?

 

 

^ This.

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I don't mind setting up for solo or duo gigs, but hate having to supervise and coordinate the load-in, set up, and sound check for my band. It creates stress that makes it hard to then get into the right music-making mode.

 

Then it sucks having to run the band's sound from the stage during the gig.

 

And, of course, the tear-down and load-out.

 

All of that is easier for solo gigs, but then there are still those nights when I need to go right home. Those are hard for me because I'm very social, and my wife is usually asleep by the time I get home (she doesn't mind my playing gigs, but she's not going to sit up and wait for me to come home and then talk with me about it all for an hour or so)! I can't sleep because I'm so pleasantly wired, can't even sit still all that comfortably, so I end up fidgetting into the wee hours--although eating is always a welcome things, because I never eat a lot before a gig.

 

Best thing for me is to get together for some food and maybe a beer with some of the other band-members, or if I'm playing solo, with some friends or some other musicians if there were others on the bill. It's even better if the venue will feed us, so we don't have to load up the car right away and take everything home before we relax a bit! A beer, some food, and some good conversation always winds me down very nicely.

 

Louis

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Not fond of tear down but it's setup that I especially don't like. I'm never completely sure everything will work and I want to be in an analogue/musical frame of mind but am forced to be techy and analytical. At least at tear down, you know everything worked.

 

Oh, and then there's the schmoozing; I'd rather read a book.

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Hauling in and setting up coz it's gotta be right and in summer here, it is HUMID! Usally drenched by the time we are ready to go.

Teardown is usually pretty quick in comparison.

Smoke is not an issue in NC coz they banned it in most restaurants and bars. I doubt I'd do this if they allowed smoking.

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...especially when I have to walk through a roomful of people sitting at tables because the restaurant/bar doesn't have an accessible back door.

 

 

Then there's places that don't have a specified stage; you arrive and a couple is having a dreamy goo-goo eyed dessert where you're expected to play in 25 minutes.

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Wow, I didn't expect tear down to be such a big one in the solo forum. It literally takes me about 15 minutes to tear down and get out of a place if I'm really hankering to get a move on. I only have one speaker, a mic stand, music stand and speaker stand. I leave most of my cables coiled with just enough slack for what I need and my "peripherals" (aka, small fan, tambourine, reading light) take two minutes to toss in my gig bag.

 

I guess the other things I hate is how long it can take to get paid sometimes. I know that bar staff want to get out just as a badly as I do some nights but I shouldn't have to stand around for 45 minutes while you wipe the bar, wash glasses and clean up. I can see my money in the envelope beside the register most times. They just have to pass it over lol.

 

Schmoozing is a hit or miss for me. Sometimes all I want to do is relax and sit quietly with a smoke and my e-reader before a gig and sometimes I can't help but go and mingle with my favourite regulars and staff. It all depends on my mood really.

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Definitely the tear down. Six-string, 12-string, looper pedal, harmony pedal, guitar preamp, mixer, PA (thank God it's just a Fishman SA-220, sometimes with a powered sub), iPod for break music, microphone, mic stand, guitar stands... and all the freakin' cables to connect it all together. And then, there are the band gigs...

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^^ Ok this I can concede too.

 

My "favourites" are the ones that stand next to you and try to subtle about singing into the microphone. I just angle myself back to them and take up their space. Or the really nice folks who want to "help" you tear down. It's one thing if I, the owner of said equipment is a little sideways when tearing down my own rig, but if you can't legally drive your vehicle after a night out, then you have no business near my stuff. I've had to physically remove someones hands from my microphone and speaker because they were trying to "help" me tear down because they "had such a good time and was great."

 

Silly nice drunks.

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yes, the drunks that want to help take your gear out to the van. they insist on helping, but know nothing about the packing order. they usually take the cases that are still empty and i need to bring them back in. i usually say, i have a formula to make it all fit. everything has its space. i got it down to a science where everything goes.

 

same as the people (who are sober) that want to help you bring in your gear. they set it right in the way. i end up doing double work when i have help.

 

its nice they offer, but i usually dont let anybody touch my gear.

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yes, the drunks that want to help take your gear out to the van. they insist on helping, but know nothing about the packing order. they usually take the cases that are still empty and i need to bring them back in. i usually say, i have a formula to make it all fit. everything has its space. i got it down to a science where everything goes.


same as the people (who are sober) that want to help you bring in your gear. they set it right in the way. i end up doing double work when i have help.


its nice they offer, but i usually dont let anybody touch my gear.

 

 

I too have had problems with others "helping" to pack my gear. I do not play in bars, so drunkenness is not an issue. However, even sober people who insist on helping have always made me nervous, often cost me time and, in some cases, have almost damaged gear. One person picked up my National, which was in its case but not yet buckled up since I had to put more things in the case, and the guitar fell out. It almost hit the pavement, but he prevented it from doing so with his foot and one of his hands (the one not holding the handle of the case). By this time, the same person had already loaded some of my gear in my car in a haphazard manner.

 

Now I tell people gently that, while I appreciate their willingness to help, I can load the gear myself. If that does not work, I tell them that it is easier for me to do it myself since I am particular about how it is loaded. If that does not work, I tell them that I would prefer that they do not load it, that I want to do it myself.

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for me that would HAVE to be, in a word... cables!...

 

cables cables... damn cables!!...

 

imagine how easy setup and tear down would be if you just had to place the various boxes in their positions.

and wiring was called up on some piece of software which made all teh virtual connections..

setup would be reduced to minutes!!!!

 

yes. for me, sure its setup and tear down, but specifically its cables and all the mess they bring!

its funny with all teh technology out there we still rely on the humble cable to do these jobs..

 

 

d

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