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Stage lights


SusieP

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What do you guys use? If any?

 

We have some battered old parcans on tripods. Four cans [64s] on each tripod.

They are looking very shabby now and the stands are really heavy!

 

We don't want to break the bank, but would like to have a look at replacements.

Same set up, a pair of four cans on a tripod and a controller.

Nice colours, easily positioned cans that are bright and effective but lightweight.

 

Everyone was really helpful helping us choose the right mixing desk, so I would love to hear what you all have to say about tripod mounted cans.

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If you want to keep them on tripods go with the LED par cans.

 

They put off no heat, they use no power, and they've got the full spectrum of colors. You can set them to solid colors, or use the built audio sensors to flash to the music or get really fancy and program them. A bit more than standard par cans, but well worth the extra expense.

 

Tough to beat these for $80 a piece.

 

http://www.guitarcenter.com/Chauvet-SlimPAR-56---LED-PAR-Can-105800528-i1518465.gc

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If you want to keep them on tripods go with the LED par cans.


They put off no heat, they use no power, and they've got the full spectrum of colors. You can set them to solid colors, or use the built audio sensors to flash to the music or get really fancy and program them. A bit more than standard par cans, but well worth the extra expense.


Tough to beat these for
$80 a piece
.


http://www.guitarcenter.com/Chauvet-SlimPAR-56---LED-PAR-Can-105800528-i1518465.gc

 

yeah since they cost $99.99.:confused::lol:

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If you want to keep them on tripods go with the LED par cans.

They put off no heat, they use no power, and they've got the full spectrum of colors. You can set them to solid colors, or use the built audio sensors to flash to the music or get really fancy and program them. A bit more than standard par cans, but well worth the extra expense.


Tough to beat these for $80 a piece.


 

 

Agreed.. I was at GC the other day and they had to of these on "clearance" for some reason for $60 each.

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If you want to keep them on tripods go with the LED par cans.


They put off no heat, they use no power, and they've got the full spectrum of colors. You can set them to solid colors, or use the built audio sensors to flash to the music or get really fancy and program them. A bit more than standard par cans, but well worth the extra expense.


Tough to beat these for $80 a piece.


 

 

Bugger. Your link takes me to a 'sorry but this item is sold out box' - but I've had a look at them elsewhere. And yes, they look pretty good.

Much slimmer than our old clunky things.

I've seen some that come as a package with tripods and controller.

 

So this 'chauvet' brand is decent stuff, is it?

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So this 'chauvet' brand is decent stuff, is it?

 

 

Yes, it is. And you'll probably never regret getting away from traditional par cans. If, for no other reason, because you pretty much need a separate circuit for them if you're going to run more than 4. The LED stuff uses very little power.

 

The only real complaint about the cheaper LED lights is that they aren't as bright as traditional pars. (Really bright LEDs cans are pretty expensive.) But for what you're doing, I have little doubt you'll find these lights to be plenty. I probaably wouldn't try to wash a 40' stage with them, but for a duo in small/medium venues? No problem.

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potts, Is that the mini? I have been considering getting one, eventually two.

 

 

Yeah Howie...Someone here was shocked when I mentioned I only use one of these. It's perfect for the little bars and places that I play. I've considered adding another one but it's just more gear in usually tight quarters.

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potts, Is that the mini? I have been considering getting one, eventually two.

 

 

Yeah Howie...Someone here was shocked when I mentioned I only use one of these. It's perfect for the little bars and places that I play. I've considered adding another one but it's just more gear in usually tight quarters.

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Susie, you play some decent sized WMC's right? If you're going to go LED, my opinion would be to go for the 3watt LED's, I don't think the chauvets' suggested will be bright enough for you, and i don't think we can get the 4bar Tri's in the uk.these are the cheapest 3watters I could find. I have no experience with stairville, but thomman are fine to deal with. (I bought some eurolite kls1001's and eurolite sls18's from them). If you are going to use these for back or side lighting, first you may want to consider front lighting, I'm sure most people here would suggest lighting the performer is priority.

 

Re Controllers, I'm using dmxis (pc based) and show buddy to program and sync the lights to BT's. Popular budget controllers include chauvet obey series, other people on here should be able to tell you about them.

 

On a lower budget, You could go with chauvet colorstrips (about

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on each tripod.

They are looking very shabby now and the stands are really heavy!


We don't want to break the bank, but would like to have a look at replacements.

Same set up, a pair of four cans on a tripod and a controller.

Nice colours, easily positioned cans that are bright and effective but lightweight.


Everyone was really helpful helping us choose the right mixing desk, so I would love to hear what you all have to say about tripod mounted cans.

 

 

Those stands must be all steel if they're that heavy. But lighting tripods tend to be heavier than speaker stands.

 

Suzi, conventional par 64s are very bright, hot, and require lots of power. But they do look great! Are you sure you're using 64s? I doubt the slim pars will give the desired brightness if you've been using par 64s. Just one conventional par 38 with a 100 watt halogen bulb is all the light I really need.

 

But with DMX fixtures (LED or halogen) you can get different colors out of just one. Wiedamark 64s for example have red, blue and green LEDs and they can be mixed to get purple, cyan, orange etc. So you probably only need about half as many fixtures. Instead of have a colored gel for each light, you get most colors from one light. Chauvet and american DJ have similar LED wash fixtures.

 

There are also color changing halogens that have a color wheel. These tend to have brighter, richer colors, but you won't get the pros of LEDs. Halogens are kind of getting phased out with LEDs becoming so popular, but I like 'em.

 

LEDs: use very little power, don't get hot, never need bulbs changed, light weight.

Halogens: brighter, richer colors. (Although LEDs are getting brighter each year).

 

Lighting technology is fast changing. LEDs are getting brighter, and new options are coming out every year.

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check out the lighting options, but I'd really be surprised if the LEDs aren't bright enough for you. We went from having 4 standard par 56s on either side to a combination of par 56 and par 64 LEDs. A lesser brand than Chauvet that I was told here not to bother with because they probably wouldn't be bright enough. No, they aren't as bright regular par cans. (Not sure WHY they call them "56s" and "64s", actually) But they really are sufficient for what we do which is just to add lighting and color to the stage. We also usually turn a couple of them out on the dance floor and they light up the dancefloor just fine as well.

 

No, they probably aren't bright enough to focus and really highlight one performer during a scene of lighting across the stage the way you can do with traditional par cans. But I doubt you're really doing a light "show" are you? You're just lighting up your stage area with some color and movement, right?

 

If so, those will be fine.

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The number is based upon the size of the lamp (bulb), measured in 1/8" increments. A PAR 64 instrument has a lamp that is 8" in diameter. Mark C.

 

 

That's correct, which doesn't have anything to do with brightness, but more to do with beam angle. If I remember correctly, conventional par 56s are 300 watts and par 64s are 500 watts. That's why there so fricking bright and need their own circuit! Conventional par 38s (100-150 watts) are usually bright enough for a solo act, but that also depends on what gel is used. Dark blue gels filter out too much light for example.

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That's correct, which doesn't have anything to do with brightness, but more to do with beam angle. If I remember correctly, conventional par 56s are 300 watts and par 64s are 500 watts. That's why there so fricking bright and need their own circuit! Conventional par 38s (100-150 watts) are usually bright enough for a solo act, but that also depends on what gel is used. Dark blue gels filter out too much light for example.

 

 

You can also get Par 56s with a 500 watt halogen bulb and Par 64s with 1000 bulbs. Back in the 80s I was in a band that had 24 -1000watt par 64s 10 500 watt fresnels and a 1500 watt follow spot.

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You can also get Par 56s with a 500 watt halogen bulb and Par 64s with 1000 bulbs. Back in the 80s I was in a band that had 24 -1000watt par 64s 10 500 watt fresnels and a 1500 watt follow spot.

 

 

yeah, you can get a tan while gigging. i remember having to clip into the breaker box direct to run our lighting system. we had a light man that set up the lighting every gig. we were hotter than hell and blind as a bat when he kicked those lights in.

 

now i use 2 chauvet color pallettes and 2 par 38 (pink gel) lights. i run the color pallettes with an off/on footswitch and the go with the beat of the bass

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We don't do a light 'show' as Guido guessed.

We only use them to colour the stage.

There are four parcans on each side on tripods - they are plenty bright but they are looking a bit battered now.

So the purchase of new ones isn't urgent, but I wanted to pick everyone's brains on here to help us make an informed decision.

The bulbs in our current cans are halogen A1/244's 500W /240v and inside the cans is a metal plate to increase the brightness.

So, Bob, I think they are 64's and not 56's ?????

 

We just have them on a chase movement sound to light. Nothing fancy.

But obviously we want to be seen.

 

And yes, skybluegary we do plenty of massive rooms as well as small restaurants. So we need lights that will be bright enough for both.

Couldnt see any Chauvet on tripods online - only Kam, and if their lights are as good as their speakers, they would have to pay us to use them. :lol::lol:

 

The store we found when looking for Allen & Heath desks also sells lights, so when the time comes, we will pay them a visit to see what they have for us to see in action.

 

And now I know Chauvet is a good brand, I will keep an eye out for them.

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Those 500w par 64s are bright lights! If that's what you're used to, you might just want to replace them with new ones. But since your using a chase, only one light is on at a time right? If that's the case, one good color changer can replace 2-4 par 64s. You could get a cheap DMX controller if you or your partner don't mind getting into a little programming.

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That's correct, which doesn't have anything to do with brightness, but more to do with beam angle. If I remember correctly, conventional par 56s are 300 watts and par 64s are 500 watts. That's why there so fricking bright and need their own circuit! Conventional par 38s (100-150 watts) are usually bright enough for a solo act, but that also depends on what gel is used. Dark blue gels filter out too much light for example.

 

 

PAR 64 lamps are available in various wattages and gasses. (Ordinary incandecent and haolgen.). In addition, the lamps are available in different beams - narrow flood, medium wide flood, etc. The term "PAR" stands for Parobolic Aluminized Reflector. The lamp itself contains the reflector surface, which is why there is no need for a lens (or set of lens) within the body of the lighing fixture. A simple sheet metal container to house the lamp is all that is needed; it is just a can-shaped fixture. Hence the term "par can" when describing the lighting instrument. Mark C.

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PAR 64 lamps are available in various wattages and gasses. (Ordinary incandecent and haolgen.). In addition, the lamps are available in different beams - narrow flood, medium wide flood, etc. The term "PAR" stands for Parobolic Aluminized Reflector. The lamp itself contains the reflector surface, which is why there is no need for a lens (or set of lens) within the body of the lighing fixture. A simple sheet metal container to house the lamp is all that is needed; it is just a can-shaped fixture. Hence the term "par can" when describing the lighting instrument. Mark C.

 

 

Thanks Miko. I've never owned these type of fixtures so I'm learning something here.

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I usually use a few LED-RAIN fixtures, placed on the floor, and possibly one or two of these 4-bars, by Lumi Professional. These fixtures go to 12' or 13' high, come in a great case, and are easy to handle. I just set them on "auto", and let them do their "thing".

 

I like a combination of "up" and "down" lighting, to avoid unflattering facial shadows (eyes, nose, chin)

 

http://lumilighting.ca/product.php?id=37

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