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In what order do you usually mount an EQ in your rack?


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Originally posted by separanets

And do you use it via the loop or just put it in series?

 

 

Depends how you want to use it. If you are using it permanently to shape the tone then it's better in series. If you're using it to change the sound at a specific point (for example, a mid boost for solos) then you'd probably want it in a switchable loop.

 

I'd guess that should also be a series loop rather than parallel so that all your signal would receive the mid boost but it's probably worth experimenting.

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Originally posted by separanets

Ok, what if my preamp hasn't got the "send/return" feature? Is it possible to connect the direct outpurs of my preamp with the inputs of the rack EQ and then link the EQ directly to the power amp or a sound processor?

 

 

Yes that's surely possible!

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Originally posted by separanets

Ok, what if my preamp hasn't got the "send/return" feature? Is it possible to connect the direct outpurs of my preamp with the inputs of the rack EQ and then link the EQ directly to the power amp or a sound processor?

 

 

Yes, that is in series where you'd be using it all the time.

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Originally posted by Dr_spooju

By knocking off some low end and emphasizing the mids and high end this will somewhat "tighten" up your sound.

 

On the countrary, my amp has a lot a lot of mids, too tight. So now I did this:

- I took a parametric EQ pedal;

- then I put a cable from the stage output of my preamp into the pedal's input;

- then linked up the pedal's output and the poweramp's input.

That's all. All worked as I needed, despite the EQ pedal was a piece of grabage made in the Sovied Times (it was supposed to be a Kalshnikov rifle first, but due to some defects found they made an EQ pedal).

 

However, I'm still stuck on ways of loop connection. Will this scheme work?

 

1) I plug a processor through the send/return loop in my preampc

2) at the same time I put the stage output cable to the EQ that I plug into the poweramp.

 

Will that work? I already see I may need a stereo EQ as well and even may be not a pedal, but a rack unit.

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I've found parametric EQs to be more useful than graphics. Several years ago, I switched from a DOD FX-something graphic pedal to a half-rack parametric ART Tube EQ, and the ART has never left my rig since. When we arrive at a venue and do our sound check, I walk out in front of the stage (with a wireless) to check out my tone. If it sounds too thin, I turn on the EQ and try it again. Works every time.

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Originally posted by Dr_spooju

You might even want to try to put an eq between your guitar and preamp.

 

I did try it yesterday and it wasn't very good, just made my sound thiner. Moreover, it left the mids im my poweramp.

 

Still, please tell me, if I have send/return sockets in my preamp and I also have an effect processor, how I should use my rack eq together with the processor?

 

1) Can I use the processor via the effect loop of my preamp and the EQ via stage output? It will eq the whole signal though, including echo and modulation, is that normal?

 

2) I can also do like this: put the EQ after the preamp through the send and put the processor via the EQ's output and link up the processor back to the return in my preamp?

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I'm going to experiment with a guitar specific EQ (MXR 10 band perhaps) in front of my pre-amp and a larger spectrum EQ directly after. I know that doesn't answer your questions, but I'm just throwing out other ideas for people to try. most cheap EQ's will make your sound less "wholesome" but I believe a good tube EQ can do wonders for dialing things in.

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Everyone should own 3 EQ pedals.

 

When you're setting up your sound, you should put an EQ before your boost/dist/od, then another between your boost and your amp, and then another in series between your preamp and poweramp (loop).

 

This gives you full tonal control over every aspect of your sound. The EQ before your boost will tailor the sound of your distortion or OD. By taking out some bass and boosting high mids or treble, you tighten up your sound and get more "crunch". After your boost, you can change the voicing of your distortion somewhat before it hits your amps gain stages. In the loop, your basically EQing the tone that you are going to live with. This is where you want to boost your mids or cut them out for that deathmetal "scooped" sound.

 

After you have everything how you like it, try to remove as many components as you can. You'll want to try to set up your amps tone and your boost tone to sound like it did with all the EQ's connected. Hopefully you can get down to 1, 2, or even no EQ. It's just WAY easier to setup if you have a few 7 band graphic EQ's instead of fiddling with a bunch of obscure knobs on various devices.

 

-W

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According to your approach, I calculate I need an EQ between the power amp and preamp, since the preamp has its own EQ to configure the sound as well as the booster does (the tone knobs on the dist/boost as I assume is what you mean by "before the dist"). And finally, I can say I'm quite satisfied with the voices of my booster and preamp. And as much as I can't use the poweramp without the tone I need, I have to set up an EQ or hehe just pick up a special poweramp for each of my preamps.

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Originally posted by starsnuffer

Everyone should own 3 EQ pedals.


When you're setting up your sound, you should put an EQ before your boost/dist/od, then another between your boost and your amp, and then another in series between your preamp and poweramp (loop).


This gives you full tonal control over every aspect of your sound. The EQ before your boost will tailor the sound of your distortion or OD. By taking out some bass and boosting high mids or treble, you tighten up your sound and get more "crunch". After your boost, you can change the voicing of your distortion somewhat before it hits your amps gain stages. In the loop, your basically EQing the tone that you are going to live with. This is where you want to boost your mids or cut them out for that deathmetal "scooped" sound.


After you have everything how you like it, try to remove as many components as you can. You'll want to try to set up your amps tone and your boost tone to sound like it did with all the EQ's connected. Hopefully you can get down to 1, 2, or even no EQ. It's just WAY easier to setup if you have a few 7 band graphic EQ's instead of fiddling with a bunch of obscure knobs on various devices.

 

 

I like this approach best of all: employ an EQ at every stage of the chain to see their effect, then remove it out if it's not achieving the result you seek.

 

If you're using more than one EQ device -- no matter where it falls in the chain -- it sounds like you need to go back to the signal source: guitar and amp (and distortion device, if you're using one, and if that's where your tone falls down). But W's description of what an EQ does in each of the three contexts is instructive.

 

And I agree with the part about graphics v. parametrics, though you can generally do more specific, corrective work with a parametric. But they can get you into trouble faster.

 

EQ's are the most versatile of the modular guitar "effects," because they really can go anywhere in the chain, in series or parallel.

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All right! What I have now is an old soviet 3 band papa EQ pedal, semi para, to ne exactly, cause it does not have the Q-factor fearture. It would totally satisfy my needs if it didn't have some drawbacks:

 

- it procudes a lot of noise

- it is way too heavy for a pedal, so it can't be mount on my rack

- it's mono.

 

I'm not going to make stereo recordings via two cabinets, so I think it's not a drawback, though I'm not sure yet.

 

I found a 3 band parametric EQ, the PreSonus EQ3B. I wish it were a rackmount device, but it is not. And I'm not sure wether it it better than the MXR 108. :(

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Originally posted by starsnuffer

Everyone should own 3 EQ pedals.


When you're setting up your sound, you should put an EQ before your boost/dist/od, then another between your boost and your amp, and then another in series between your preamp and poweramp (loop).


This gives you full tonal control over every aspect of your sound. The EQ before your boost will tailor the sound of your distortion or OD. By taking out some bass and boosting high mids or treble, you tighten up your sound and get more "crunch". After your boost, you can change the voicing of your distortion somewhat before it hits your amps gain stages. In the loop, your basically EQing the tone that you are going to live with. This is where you want to boost your mids or cut them out for that deathmetal "scooped" sound.


After you have everything how you like it, try to remove as many components as you can. You'll want to try to set up your amps tone and your boost tone to sound like it did with all the EQ's connected. Hopefully you can get down to 1, 2, or even no EQ. It's just WAY easier to setup if you have a few 7 band graphic EQ's instead of fiddling with a bunch of obscure knobs on various devices.


-W

 

 

This is really bad advice for most players. IMHO.... And I'm not even an EQ basher, I like having plenty of EQ available.

 

But to be honest, I'd start off with a preamp/power amp combination that I inherently liked the sound of first, dial that in for the basic tone, and then employ EQ sparingly as a tweaking mechanism at whatever stage needed it.... rather than intentionally getting caught in EQ tweaking hell with some trainwreck of a rig that had been originally dialed in with three supplemental EQs, and then trying to go backwards to eliminate all of that excessive external EQ after the fact. That doesn't even make the slightest bit of sense to me.

 

No Offense... I guess we approach rigs differently. And while I'm sure it works for you... I really bet most people would find the approach you're suggesting counter-productive.

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I think it matters less , because the approaches described by both of you lead to one and the same goal. I understood long before that the sound is something hard to tweak and all ways here are possible. Especially when I analized gear used by diffrent stars.

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