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Benefits Of This Set-Up


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Pro's of the rack set-up:

 

Flexability!

In a rack set-up, you have a midi pre-amp that you can program. So you can save 128 preamp settings and go from one to another by a tap of the foot. for your solos, tap another preset with a little bit more gain, volume and different EQ. Choose the volume for all the sound you use in a song. Choose for a preset to go 100% in the multi fx or just a little bit. Very usefull. I don't think you'll be tweaking your head's knobs a lot on stage.

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What are the benefits of using a head with rack gear compared to just rack gear? I'm trying to decide whether I should keep my Trip. Rect. Head or sell it for some gear? Thanks


- Patrick

 

 

Hey AliensExist4,

 

I own & gig on 2 different stereo guitar rack systems ( large & small), combo amp w/effects rack, and an amp head w/effects rack. If you're happy with the sound of the amp head you have, you make it more versatile for your musical needs by getting a MIDI foot controller and some sort of audio switching system to change channels on the amp head via MIDI. You don't have to necessarily purchase a full blown stereo guitar rack rig like me. You can get a small 4 space rack, a power conditioner, a nice used effects unit of your choice and an audio switching system to change the amp head's channels. Connect the effects to your effects loop, connect MIDI cables to the MIDI foot controller, effects unit & audio switching system, program your audio switching system with your effects via MIDI and you can change channels & effects at the same time with one step on a footswitch.

 

Guitar George

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Patrick,

At a time I began to ask myself the same question, but for me the ability to store so many preamp settings+ multi fx settings in one preset is really a nice thing. But it takes time to program everything you need, just to set the levels in a coherent way is sometimes hard, because the difference between your low and loud sounds is not the same if the poweramp is set soft or loud.

what I mean is that if programming is not your cup of tea, you will not do it enough, and your system will not be enjoyable if you don't have 15 or 20 preset well programmed.So, at that point, a head is better. For the volume change(solos), you can use a booster wich is great.

I may have better advices if you tell me what kind of music you like and how you will use fx

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why not keep the head and try the rack gear with it before you sell it? I lug around my JCM800 head with my rack. It can be a pain but I wouldn't trade it for any rack power amp.

 

+1

 

I use a multi-amp head (4) W/D/W setup w/ a rack full of stuff. Works great! :thu:

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Hey AliensExist4,


I own & gig on 2 different stereo guitar rack systems ( large & small), combo amp w/effects rack, and an amp head w/effects rack. If you're happy with the sound of the amp head you have, you make it more versatile for your musical needs by getting a MIDI foot controller and some sort of audio switching system to change channels on the amp head via MIDI. You don't have to necessarily purchase a full blown stereo guitar rack rig like me. You can get a small 4 space rack, a power conditioner, a nice used effects unit of your choice and an audio switching system to change the amp head's channels. Connect the effects to your effects loop, connect MIDI cables to the MIDI foot controller, effects unit & audio switching system, program your audio switching system with your effects via MIDI and you can change channels & effects at the same time with one step on a footswitch.


Guitar George

 

 

:thu:

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Ya, I'm planning on getting a Triaxis and learning and playing with it with my head to see if I even like it then I'll go from there. I just wanted to know If I should consider a power amp or just stick with my head. And If I stick with my head what are the pros and cons of doing so compared to a power amp rack unit? Thanks

 

- Patrick

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Aside from any tone/volume/transport considerations, I'd see it as follows:

 

A separate power amp will allow you to run in stereo while using your head as a power amp you can only run in mono.

 

Use the head as a power amp however you also have the amp's preamp section available as a backup if the rack preamp plays up.

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