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You guys with the BBE's in your guitar racks.


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I got a BBE because almost every rack pictured in Guitar ??? Mag in the late 80 to early 90's seemed to have one. My friend had one, I guy who I worked with had one......

I agree with you guys. Personally it's been in bypass mode for years. IMHO It castrates your tone. I found that I liked the tone with it off over time. I don't really want my rig to sound like a hi-fi. Some might though....

I guess the best way to get rid of the BBE addiction is get it out of the rack. If I leave it in I know I'll be tempted to waste time comparing the in/out processed sound.

Anyone remember how to explain what it does when you'd be asked ...What does it do? "Well it ah...it cleans up the sound, and it splits the bass and treble freq's into separate parts, uh, aaaaand time shifts the hi and lows...uh, then it slows down the bass and improves the perceived dynamics, adding clearity."

Anyways, I wasted a lot of time comparing the with and without sound when I should've just been :rawk:
LOL

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"Metal Tone" is an oxymoron.




Yer an oxymoron!

:blah:

BBE is great for boosting 5khz and 500hz frequencies.. kinda like a cheesy 2-band EQ... So, for a basic "metal" (a.k.a. what is all too often a mid-scoop sound) it could work.

But, if you really want brittle, brash highs and boomy midbass, just use a crappy amp in the first place!

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I'm not saying I like the tone, it is what it is. If I wanted that scooped guitar sound I'd use a Mesa or a 5150. If I wanted a processed sound I'd use a solid-state Randall or a Rockman but I don't.

 

My taste in tone is that of 70s rock primarily.

 

Scooped midrange is something that most people never get beyond. I used it for a while myself along with EMGs when I had only been playing for about a year. When I started playing more rock/clean I ditched the EMGs and started using Duncans. Considering that was almost 10 years ago now I think I've come a long way.

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mmmm @ Mesa (particularly Mark III/IV and Triaxis) and 5150 sounds.

Scooped sound is great at low volume... gotta have some mids to fill out a full volume mix though.

But back to topic, the only reason BBE sounds like it gives "cut" to a sound is because it boosts the 5khz frequency.

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What's the BBE? Is it only an emasculated EQ or as they say it is a harmonics generator? What kind of backing does it give to yuor tone?


Thanks.

 

 

from the site.

 

All music that is amplified through a loudspeaker suffers some loss of fidelity - or subtle distortions - caused by the inherent characteristics of the loudspeaker itself. The BBE system addresses these problems by compensating for phase and amplitude distortions and, in effect, delivering the signal to the speaker in a form which allows it to reproduce the original live performance more fully and more faithfully.

 

To understand how BBE sound processing technology works, consider the characteristics of a loudspeaker and what we expect from one. Among a loudspeaker's most important requirements is the ability to reproduce transients - the brief high-energy bursts at the beginning of sounds. The transients then evolve into harmonics. It is the particular amplitudes and phase relationships of these transients and harmonics which add the unique color and character to each sound.

Varying either the amplitude or the phase of the transients and harmonics within signal causes distortion of the sound's characteristics. By drastically altering the transient response of a sound, it's possible to make a cymbal crash seem like a car crash. Similarly, altering amplitude or phase relationships of the harmonics in a clarinet's tone can make it sound more like a flute, or a French horn like an oboe.

 

 

 

A loudspeaker's transient response is typically expressed in terms of amplitude response (how quickly it reacts to an incoming signal), with little or no regard to phase response (whether high and low frequencies are reproduced at the proper time). The ability to accurately represent a sound's phase and amplitude define the quality of a loudspeaker's transient and steady - state, or sustained, response.

If a loudspeaker's amplitude response curve were linear, then the relationship between the high and low frequencies would be correct. And if a loudspeaker's phase response curve were linear, then the low and high frequencies would reach the listener's ears in their correct time order. This would result in faithful reproduction of the sound. However, this isn't normally the case.

 

 

 

When we listen to live music, all of the highs and lows reach our ears in the same relationship to each other as when they were created by the instruments. If this same live music were to be recorded and played back through a loudspeaker system, the loudspeaker would introduce frequency-dependent phase shifting. The inductance of the speaker's voice coil creates a stronger impedance as the signal's frequency increases, resulting in a time delay. Consequently, frequency components with large negative phase shifts (high frequencies) arrive at the listener's ear later than signals undergoing small phase shifts (low frequencies). The resultant signal is distorted in the time domain to the listener's ear. Audio material containing sharp transients (e.g., percussive and plucked sounds such as drums, guitar, piano and harpsichord, etc.) suffers the most from this phenomenon, making it seem unfocused, or mushy.

In order to address these problems inherent in basic loudspeaker design, BBE Sound, Inc. has developed a circuit that has two primary functions. The first adjusts the phase relationships of the low, mid and high frequencies. Since a loudspeaker's natural tendency is to add progressively longer delay times to higher frequencies, the BBE sound processing system adds progressively longer delay times to lower frequencies. This creates a kind of "mirror" curve to the time delay curve created by the speaker, neutralizing its phase distortion.

 

The second major element in the BBE system is the augmentation of the higher and lower frequencies. Loudspeakers tend to be less efficient in their extreme treble and bass ranges. Most sound-reproducing systems include a circuit for boosting high and low frequencies, showing an accepted awareness of the loudspeaker's efficiency problem. The BBE system, however, provides a dynamic, program-driven augmentation which combines with the phase compensation feature to restore the brilliance and clarity of the original live sound. The result is, as one professional journal phrased it, "The most hearable advance in audio technology since high fidelity itself!"

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It's really a cool atricle. Thank you.

 

As far I understand these principles are very useful when dealing with live acoustic instuments like a cello or fiddle, a voice, after all. In an electric guitar the source of the signal is a pickup. So the signal going through a speaker is quite a natural thing as itself, which can mean that what is comensation for acoustic sounds will be redundant interference for an electric guitar (or a synthesizer).

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BBE's explanation is very deceptive and full of half truths. They are describing what happens to P.A. speakers when you are listening to them from a long enough distance that you would notice a delay between the high and low frequencies. That means you would need to be at least 20-30 feet away to even begin to hear a difference. How many guitarists stand 30 feet from their rig? When you mic the speaker it's only inches away. How much delay between the highs and lows do you get in 2-3 inches. So according to BBE's own explanation,the whole concept of using one in a guitar rig is just plain retarded.

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