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New to rack set up....some help?


BTBAM

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It's a great way to run pedals.

 

 

Yes it is.

 

I went from a pedalboard of 13 pedals to a rack with 2 sliding shelves (8 pedals total now) the Rocktron patchmate to switch them, a G-major, and the All Access to control it. It is WAY easier to use this mess after getting use to it. Rack {censored} is not cheap though thats for sure.

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With reference to the GCX, Patchmate, and Axess switching and looping units mentioned above, has anyone tried any of the G-LAB stuff?

 

http://www.glab.com.pl/mgc-6_en

 

I've not seen any of it but there some demos on Youtube of some of their kit, and the beastie above and its apparent expandability to add other modules seems quite interesting.

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Okay, so I'm an avid pedal user, and I was thinking of going to a rack mounted set up. I'm not real big about getting into the rack units as much as going to a midi controlled set up. Now, I feel like I have an idea of what I'm getting into, but maybe people here can assist me...Here is my current rig:



Mainly, I just enjoy pulling from all of my effects, but would like to improve the overall tone I'm getting.


I was thinking of just getting some type of furman power conditioner, 2 or 3 GCX audio switchers, the Ground Control Pro MIDI Foot Controller, and then slideable shelves for most all of my pedals.


I play solo and with a band, so solo I can leave lots of settings alone, but in band I may tweak some knobs on a phaser or chorus. The rack can stay close so I could still tweak.


I thought about possibly getting the Echo Pro instead of my line 6 DL-4, but other than that, wasn't really looking into any rack gear. I'm not sure if it will be able to have a section (unlatching switch) to control my tap tempo tremolo and delays (with aux outs from the pedals) on the foot controller or how I'd control the echo park via the foot controller.



What do you all think or do you have any suggestions?

 

I did the same thing a few years ago. I recently scaled down my setup. The Boss GT-Pro replaced my old Echo Pro and it's extra effects and three additional effects loops allowed me to use a smaller setup and get the same sounds I got with my larger rig.

 

The only rack effects are the GT-Pro and a spring reverb unit.

 

I made the cables from scratch with solid core wire and I built the rack interface myself. :)

 

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I completely agree that the GCX is severely limited when compared to what is now available from other manufacturers. If you're using it with a GCP then there are no issues, but the GCP is a mid level controller at best. I love most of Voodoo Lab's stuff but the GCP/GCX combination, while good, is really about two tiers below what is available elsewhere.

 

Regarding controllers I've always been partial to the All Access due to the ability to assign each IA switch to a different function for each preset, you can set it up as global if you want but this feature can be extremely useful. That and the footprint is smaller than a lot of other controllers (including the GCP).

 

If I were putting it together, I would run with two of the RJM Effect Gizmo's when they become available. The groups of 4 internally wired loops will cut out the need for a good many cables when compared to something like the Rocktron Patchmate or the GCX.

 

EDIT: And the solderless Lava Mini ELC is close to perfect for wiring racks.

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I completely agree that the GCX is severely limited when compared to what is now available from other manufacturers. If you're using it with a GCP then there are no issues, but the GCP is a mid level controller at best. I love most of Voodoo Lab's stuff but the GCP/GCX combination, while good, is really about two tiers below what is available elsewhere.

 

Lots of pros use them. Mine have survived several tours, studio sessions and general gigging without so much as a hiccup (I had a backup for my GCP, but I never had to use it for the 5 years I owned it...I finally sold it and three years later, I'm still using my main GCP without any problems)

 

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...and they've done everything I need them to do. They sounded better than the Patchmates I used to own and the Axess Electronics loop switchers I've owned.

 

I don't know what everyone else is using them for that they find them so woefully inadequate, but I've never had an issue with them. :idk:

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EDIT: And the solderless Lava Mini ELC is close to perfect for wiring racks.

 

I used to use solderless cables in my rig, but after a year's worth of heavy gigging and touring with my rack bouncing around in the back of the van they started coming loose and began failing.

 

I began soldering Switchcraft ends to George L's until I began making my own cables from scratch by twisting, shielding and shrink tubing 18 gauge solid core wire. Not only does the solid core wire sound great, but you can right angle the wire for clean placement, it's easier to solder and you can loop it around the terminal for added durability...combined with a nice epoxy stress relief between the contacts and it's virtually indestructible. :thu:

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I used to use solderless cables in my rig, but after a year's worth of heavy gigging and touring with my rack bouncing around in the back of the van they started coming loose and began failing.

 

 

Which is why I like the Lava stuff. It's significantly more durable than the other solderless stuff on the market. If you haven't already, take a look at it, it's quite impressive. The connectors are very solid, very low profile, and the cable is very easy to work with.

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Which is why I like the Lava stuff. It's significantly more durable than the other solderless stuff on the market. If you haven't already, take a look at it, it's quite impressive. The connectors are very solid, very low profile, and the cable is very easy to work with.

 

 

IMO, it all depends on your tolerance for possible issues in your rig. If you're like me, I'd rather spend the hours needed to completely solder up a rig with good plugs that pretty much never fail if done properly rather than risk having to chase down an issue at soundcheck.

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