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Vintage record player


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Trying and utterly failing to get an old record player working.

The thing is, everything works, more or less. At least it did when I got it! Plug it in, and the single tube glows. Turn the switch to ON and the platter starts turning. Put an LP on the spindle and the switch to REJ and the record drops, then everything stops. Turn the platter a little, and everything starts moving again, record plays.

I figure something is sticky, so I tear it apart. Oil the motor, check all of the moving parts. Everything seems fine. Putting it back together, a part falls out. No idea where it came from. I check, everything seems to be working. I put it back together, and the arm doesn't lift and return after playing. I turn it over, and it works. Eventually, I find where the part went. It was holding up a link. When right side up, the link dropped and didn't perform its function.

Now it's all back together, but it still freezes up. In addition, it no longer plays; the needle skitters across the record. On a modern turntable, there's an anti-skate mechanism to prevent this. If this old thing has such, I can't find it. It's also possible that I broke off the needle while working on it. I might flip it over and try the 78 RPM needle, see if that works at all.

Yeah, that worked. I must have broken the needle off.

Anyway, it's an ELECTONE model 4350. At this point, I'm about to give up. It may be that the 60-year-old motor just isn't up to the job anymore.

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You may be right about the motor, which has become weak and unable to sustain a load. You might disassemble it and clean the rotor and windings, and check the brushes. Once the ancient crud is cleaned off the internal workings, it might have enough zip left to play a platter.

I have a small space heater that could not start spinning the fan, but would run if you would get it started, so I had to do this type of surgery on the motor and it has managed to make it through the winter

Best regards, Jack

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60 years of dust and magnetized particles probably have taken a toll on the motor, as suspected, and a cleaning would likely help.

Is this a belt drive or direct drive TT?

If it is belt driven, examine, clean and lube all the rotational contact points of the belt...also examine the belt ...they do stretch over time and start to 'slip'.

I have not had to service a TT in so long....maybe 40 years...😎

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Possible, but rim drives typically don't 'slip'...unless the rubber transfer 'tire' is heavily worn...and that is, in my limited experience, not a common issue.

Isaac42 is experiencing what I can only define, based on his observation, as 'slip'.

The rim drive [aka idler] motors are higher torque, and I can't remember ever 'servicing' a rim drive TT because of the motor having issues, or the rubber 'tire' wearing down to where it was not making adequate contact....:idk:

I can't find any information on Electone TTs [Electone is also a Yamaha keyboard designation]...so the discussion is moot absent additional info from Isaac42

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17 hours ago, DeepEnd said:

Given its age probably rim drive.

Bingo!

I delibaerately called it a record player, instead of a turntable. It is self-contained, has a monophonic ceramic cartridge, and an amplifier with one vacuum tube powering a single speaker. 78, 45, 33⅓ and 16⅔ rpm.

I has occurred to me that the rim drive could be slipping when the load is increased on the mechanism.

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3 hours ago, daddymack said:

Possible, but rim drives typically don't 'slip'...unless the rubber transfer 'tire' is heavily worn...and that is, in my limited experience, not a common issue.

Isaac42 is experiencing what I can only define, based on his observation, as 'slip'.

The rim drive [aka idler] motors are higher torque, and I can't remember ever 'servicing' a rim drive TT because of the motor having issues, or the rubber 'tire' wearing down to where it was not making adequate contact....:idk:

I can't find any information on Electone TTs [Electone is also a Yamaha keyboard designation]...so the discussion is moot absent additional info from Isaac42

Yeah, I couldn't find much of anything on it, either. Lots on the Yamaha keyboards, but that's not useful to me in this context!

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take a look at the contact point of the drive 'tire'...it is possible that after decades of service it has worn down, dried and shrunk, etc.

To be honest, I have not worked on a unit probably as old as yours...good luck!

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Very common for a rim drive tire to glaze on the outer edge. A little rubber rejuvenator will take care of that. The other common item is for the grease in the table support bearings to turn to paste.  You scrub those out and re-grease with PhonoLube or LubriPlate. I'm partial to white lithium grease, meself.

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