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Anybody want a free real-time analyzer???


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hmmmm,,, what if i used an external hard-drive>

 

I've got a Core2Duo iMac that I've just set-up for my home recording studio. 4gb ram/320gb system HD/500gb external, and I've just refurbed my old PC desktop.

 

Do you need a special mic in order to use the RTA?

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hmmmm,,, what if i used an external hard-drive>


I've got a Core2Duo iMac that I've just set-up for my home recording studio. 4gb ram/320gb system HD/500gb external, and I've just refurbed my old PC desktop.

 

 

External drives won

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yeah... but i mean, what do you do? You put a physical one in your pa and it measures things, how does it work in the computer?

 

 

It's just math and a display. No need for actual hardware, aside from a good test mic and a sound card.

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yeah... but i mean, what do you do? You put a physical one in your pa and it measures things, how does it work in the computer?

 

 

You use a reference mic (a mic that has as flat response as possible, so the mic doesn't introduce inaccuracies) into the computer's sound card. The software simply slices up what it hears into slivers of frequencies, and measures them. It may have a tone generator to create pink or white noise, which you'd play through your system, or you would use a CD of these tones.

 

If your computer doesn't have the right sound I/O capabilities, you may need to buy an external interface, such as M-Audio's USB or firewire devices.

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Do you need a special mic in order to use the RTA?

 

 

You should use a reference mic, since any bumps or dips in response will show us as bumps and dips in your system. dbx has a decent mic sold with the Driveracks for about $99, and of course Uli has a cheapo version for like $30.

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+/-5dB? How can you trust this for anything? That would make an RTA unuseable for anything but fooling around.

That's actually the sensitivity spec. It uses a Panasonic WM-64PC capsule: WM-64.png

My understanding is the cheap reference mics also use the Panasonic capsules.

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It appears to have a flatter response than a DPA 4007

The cheap reference mics tend to have audible distortion at high SPL's but people do use the Behringer one as a drum overhead or even in home studio applications. There is a hardware hack for the Panasonic capsule to lower both its sensitivity and distortion:

http://sound.westhost.com/project93.htm

Lots of interesting stuff there and the mod is down towards the bottom at "Figure 8".

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It appears to have a flatter response than a DPA 4007

 

Yes Dennis, my thoughts exactly. ;)

 

The +/-5dB is not, of course, a uniform sensitivity response, it's a frequency response tolerance. Anybody who thinks otherwise is fooling themselves.

 

It's relatively easy to generate an overall average sensitivity of +/-1dB but not from 20-20kHz relative to say 1kHz.

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