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Hey guys, I usually post in the Amp forum but I figure this question is more appropriate here... As the question states I'm looking for some strings that don't have the wound G so I can play leads on my acoustic; any recommendations?

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Hello

You could use a set of 10 or 11 gauge electric guitar strings with a plain G string. Some people say you can't use electric guitar strings on acoustics but you can - works fine.

Also, I think D'Addario do a set of 9 gauge for acoustic guitars - one of their Great American Bronze range.

Or you could just substitute a plain G for the wound G in any set.

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You don't actually want a plain third on an acoustic guitar. The saddle on an acoustic is compensated for a wound third and the guitar won't intonate right as you go up the fretboard. A 10-47 set, which will have a wound third, is probably the best you're going to be able to do.

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14 hours ago, DeepEnd said:

You don't actually want a plain third on an acoustic guitar. The saddle on an acoustic is compensated for a wound third and the guitar won't intonate right as you go up the fretboard. A 10-47 set, which will have a wound third, is probably the best you're going to be able to do.

A plain G does work, Deep. If there is any difference in intonation it's very, very slight.

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11 hours ago, garthman said:

A plain G does work, Deep. If there is any difference in intonation it's very, very slight.

Several years ago I tried two plain thirds in unison on my 12-string. I could get the guitar in tune with open strings but any chord that fretted the third string sounded dreadful, way beyond the normal 12-string tuning issues. I can't recommend it in good conscience, the OP is asking for trouble IMHO.

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This may sound outrageous.......... but years ago when I only had an acoustic, I made my own bridge out of two bridges and superglue. It did a pretty

good job of compensating for a plain third. (I notched out the first bridge and had a second bridge behind it for the plain third). 

 

Dan

 

 

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I'm going to go with the extra light set recommendation as well. I have tried plain G on an acoustic, and the only time I felt it worked well was in open tunings for playing slide.

A different option: go with a 'Nashville' tuning using the the lighter wound E/A/D and plain G from an acoustic 12 string set. I've been thinking about doing this on one of my A/Es...just haven't gotten to it yet...

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4 hours ago, Dan Furr55 said:

This may sound outrageous.......... but years ago when I only had an acoustic, I made my own bridge out of two bridges and superglue. It did a pretty

good job of compensating for a plain third. (I notched out the first bridge and had a second bridge behind it for the plain third). 

 

Dan

I think you probably mean two saddles, the plastic, bone, TUSQ, etc. part. The bridge is the wooden piece that sits on the top of the guitar. Takamine has used a split saddle for years. Lowden does too. Probably others I don't know.

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