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15 hours ago, 6down1togo said:

You can also get a tune-o-matic style bridge that drops right on the wood base. They brighten/focus the tone a bit. They sell for less than $20 on eBay and include both the bridge and the base. Throw the base out and use yours since it fits the contour of your top. They come with small bushings that slip over the tuner posts so the bridge doesn't rock on the smaller posts. I've bought this one Tune-o-matic style jazz bridge and installed on vintage Japanese hollowbodies. The difference was like and night and day on those.

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10 euros doesn't seem too expensive! :) thanks!

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On 7/5/2020 at 2:41 PM, daddymack said:

Happy NGD! Enjoy!

a moment of steel wool application and that spot should be gone.

Floating bridges are a PITA, but you can pin the base in place...I'm would not do exactly what this guy did, I would use something like a small roll pin rather than nails, and even he admits he should have taped the bridge down for the transfer of the holes...I would have drilled through just to mark the points, then removed the bridge, drilled, installed the pins and then put the bridge back...he spends way too much time fussing with those nails, IMHO

A friend was installing a bridge on a violin . I asked him how do you know where it goes? He explained that it needs to be over the sound posts and the trick is to line it up with the points on the center of the f-holes. I’ve noticed the same holds true for my guitar, an Ibanez AF75.
I was slightly off this time but within range of the intonation screws 

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yes, on a violin, cello, viola, even upright bass, the sound posts are the transfer points for the bridge, and the relationship of bridge location to the posts are positioned specifically for best projection based on the 'f'-holes. Jazz guitars however, don't have sound posts...and, sadly, many low end manufacturers do not understand the proper placement of 'f'-holes'.

The 'big' guys, Gibson/Epiphone, Gretsch, Guild/DeArmond, and Ibanez, understand the proper placement tradition on their hollow bodies, but on their semi-hollow bodies [where it isn't as critical], Gibson/Ibanez put the bridge below the 'points', and Gretsch/Guild above...

Many just consider them as 'decorative' on a semi, like on Fender Thinlines.

The time-saving of pinning a bridge, though, is worth it if you change strings frequently and like to clean the instrument at that opportunity. I've pinned a few for folks over the years...

 

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I used to mark the location with masking tape whenI had one with a rosewood bridge .Even that was not terrible to intonate if I at least got it close to start with. I guess I feel that if it was supposed to be fixed the factory would have done it 

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On 7/15/2020 at 8:51 PM, gardo said:

A friend was installing a bridge on a violin . I asked him how do you know where it goes? He explained that it needs to be over the sound posts and the trick is to line it up with the points on the center of the f-holes. I’ve noticed the same holds true for my guitar, an Ibanez AF75.
I was slightly off this time but within range of the intonation screws 

F51D3150-D310-41BF-9154-2CF92D05A92D.thumb.jpeg.acf30cc41f8c3406dea586985534fbb7.jpeg

 

That may get you in the ballpark but you need a tuner (or a very good ear) to check the intonation to assure you are in the correct spot. The bridge should be positioned at 24-3/4" (if Gibson scale) as measured from near edge of the nut to centerline of the bridge saddle for each string. The adjustable bridge polepieces allow fine tuning to compensate for differences of string length in lieu of angling the bridge (and compromising the intonation of adjacent strings) to compensate for string gauge, depth and radius of the string slots in the nut and the slight curvature of the neck due to neck relief necessary to eliminate fret buzz and fretting out (string contacts the fret ahead of the fretted note) or unlevel frets. Even a cheap $10.00 clamp-on tuner works fine for this. On a guitar with low action, I tune the fretted octave note to the open string via the bridge adjustment. On a guitar with high action, I use the harmonic at the 12th fret and the fretted 12th fret note. Either way is a compromise of sorts.

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Yes ,I always use a tuner to set intonation.. If I give the guitar a cleaning and polishing the points on the f holes give me a starting point when restringing. Some people change the string one at a time to keep the bridge in place. I had in the past used a piece of masking tape as a reference to locate the bridge to install strings. I find it much easier to jut remove all of the strings and the bridge for a good cleaning. When it's time to put everything back I start with the bridge centered with the f holes then use a tuner to get it exact. I use 12th fret harmonic  and fretted

 

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Congratulations! This is the second electric guitar that you have ever owned, or just number two in your current collection? I've played some of the hollow/semi-hollow Ibanez guitars and liked them quite a bit. Enjoy!

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7 hours ago, u6crash said:

Congratulations! This is the second electric guitar that you have ever owned, or just number two in your current collection? I've played some of the hollow/semi-hollow Ibanez guitars and liked them quite a bit. Enjoy!

I've only had five guitars total...

A Guild Gad-25. (a lovely guitar that I recently swapped for the Ibanez).

A Vintage V300 - that I gave to a friend once I got my.. 

LAKEWOOD D1 (I love this thing!).

Then my first electric a Harley Benton TE-52 NA (about $150..for a really cool Tele! I think this was a very reasonable first electric).

Now the Ibanez AK-95. 

So yes, second electric ever... I'm still fiddling around with it to figure it out exactly...getting clean jazz tones and something a bit creamier...

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