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arcadesonfire

Electric guitarists: what strings do you use??

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Posted (edited)
19 hours ago, redEL34 said:

Aren’t guitar strings like new tubes for the most part? Like very few companies producing for multiple brands? Pink Slinky’s here most of the time. But like most things, I have a stash of strings here as if they cure Coronavirus, so I have several brands of electric, acoustic and bass strings. Not much difference between brands IMO. Pink Slinky’s are just cheap. 

Yes. Mapes extrudes most of the music wire in use for the various brands. Some claim to extrude their own but it's usually from bulk wire produced by Mapes (the Steinway piano company's preferred string maker).

https://www.mapeswire.com/mapes-music-wire-types/

Their sets -

https://www.mapesstrings.com/product/electric-guitar-strings/

I buy straight from them for my acoustic (don't own an electric).

 

 

Edited by Idunno
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Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, stratosaurus said:

 

 

11 hours ago, stratosaurus said:

 

Another question would be...what do you do to maintain them, after playing? I actually use 3 in 1 oil to clean & wipe them down, every time I  play. Been doing that for many years  without any harm to the guitar necks.

I believe that luthiers use linseed oil, which is friendly to wood.

Edited by thankyou
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21 hours ago, arcadesonfire said:

Looks like Dean Markley has stopped producing the Blue Steel strings. I used them for 20+ years. Loved em because they maintained their springiness much longer than other makes, but they weren’t overly springy. Does anybody know if they’re making the same thing but under a different name? 

What make for you use? How would you describe the sound?

I go on stage for the first time in a year next weekend. Gotta restring and be ready. (BTW, I use gauge 10-46.)

I'm in the same boat. For decades I used Dean Markley Custom lite (thin high strings fat low). Then they stopped making the "yellow packet" version and switched to "Blue Steel".I switched with them, just out of brand loyalty.

When I got the SG, I started using Gibson vintage style 10's. They sound great but tend to wear out pretty quick.

For the Gretsch and the homemade tele, I have been bouncing around between brands, usually ernie balls, because they have the Fat/Thin gauge setup I like.

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Posted (edited)
52 minutes ago, BA.Barcolounger said:

I'm in the same boat. For decades I used Dean Markley Custom lite (thin high strings fat low). Then they stopped making the "yellow packet" version and switched to "Blue Steel".I switched with them, just out of brand loyalty.

When I got the SG, I started using Gibson vintage style 10's. They sound great but tend to wear out pretty quick.

For the Gretsch and the homemade tele, I have been bouncing around between brands, usually ernie balls, because they have the Fat/Thin gauge setup I like.

I was yellow pack before blues too. We are dating ourselves.

The Gibson Vintage are very similar to the old yellows. 

Edited by bildo

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16 hours ago, Red Ant said:

Nothing whatsoever. Apparently my sweat isn't corrosive, as a set of strings will last me for a year of daily playing. 

I’m totally jealous. I seem to have near Chernobyl levels of toxicity in my sweat, and go through a set of uncoated strings in about a month in winter, and about two weeks in the summer if I’m playing a lot. Yes, I wipe them down after playing, and I’ll even use “finger sleaze” (Finger Ease) to try to clean them and make them last longer when they start to corrode and rust. It helps a bit, but not much...  :( 

Because of that, I usually use Elixirs. I prefer the nanowebs. Gauge depends on the particular guitar... 9’s and 10’s on the electrics, 12’s and 13’s on the acoustic guitars. I get about 3x the life out of them compared to non-coated strings, maybe a bit more. 

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Phil, have you tried the Optiweb Elixirs?  Supposed to feel like an uncoated string but I've not tried them.

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13 hours ago, thankyou said:

 

I believe that luthiers use linseed oil, which is friendly to wood.

I use mineral oil on the fretboard. 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, arf-boy said:

I use mineral oil on the fretboard. 

Here's an article that addresses this.  Taylor says that linseed, lemon and mineral oil are all acceptable, just don't overdo any of them.  Sounds like none of them are good for finished surfaces, like Fender maple necks.  

https://blog.taylorguitars.com/fretboard-oil

Edited by thankyou

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On 3/7/2020 at 8:10 PM, arcadesonfire said:

Looks like Dean Markley has stopped producing the Blue Steel strings. I used them for 20+ years. Loved em because they maintained their springiness much longer than other makes, but they weren’t overly springy. Does anybody know if they’re making the same thing but under a different name? 

What make for you use? How would you describe the sound?

I go on stage for the first time in a year next weekend. Gotta restring and be ready. (BTW, I use gauge 10-46.)

Well I USED to use the Blue Steel custom lights.

Guess not any more. :sad:

 

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29 minutes ago, nedezero1 said:

Well I USED to use the Blue Steel custom lights.

Guess not any more. :sad:

 

GHS FTW.

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Years ago I used to use gold-plated strings.   I forget who made them.  I don’t know if the sounded any better, but they looked cool on my Les Paul. 

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Posted (edited)
25 minutes ago, Vito Corleone said:

Years ago I used to use gold-plated strings.   I forget who made them.  I don’t know if the sounded any better, but they looked cool on my Les Paul. 

I would guess they were Trump-brand strings. 

Edited by arcadesonfire

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Just now, arcadesonfire said:

I would guess they were Trump-brand strings. 

Nah. 

They actually worked.   

:) 

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1 hour ago, thankyou said:

Here's an article that addresses this.  Taylor says that linseed, lemon and mineral oil are all acceptable, just don't overdo any of them.  Sounds like none of them are good for finished surfaces, like Fender maple necks.  

https://blog.taylorguitars.com/fretboard-oil

Thank you, thankyou.

 

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Been using pure nickel .10s for a while now. DR Pure blues, and lately Curt Mangan "vintage pure nick round core." They are a little darker and softer sounding, which complements the pickups in my guitars of choice (mostly 90s and older G&Ls). 

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1 hour ago, Vito Corleone said:

Years ago I used to use gold-plated strings.   I forget who made them.  I don’t know if the sounded any better, but they looked cool on my Les Paul. 

Ha! I remember those! They seemed really cheesey but they actually sounded good. I thought they were EVH strings.

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4 hours ago, Into Nation said:

Phil, have you tried the Optiweb Elixirs?  Supposed to feel like an uncoated string but I've not tried them.

I don't know - I am beta-testing a set of unmarked Elixirs right now - they feel really good, but I'm not sure what they are. :idk:

 

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1 hour ago, Tom Hicks said:

When I change strings and clean the fretboard I finish with lemon oil.

 

I occasionally treat my rosewood fretboards with a little lemon oil, but not my maple necks. 

 

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6 hours ago, Phil O'Keefe said:

I’m totally jealous. I seem to have near Chernobyl levels of toxicity in my sweat, and go through a set of uncoated strings in about a month in winter, and about two weeks in the summer if I’m playing a lot.

I'm the opposite. MY fingers are are super dry. So much so that they crack in the winter.

I can go about 3 months between changing strings. And we gig alot.

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35 minutes ago, BA.Barcolounger said:

I'm the opposite. MY fingers are are super dry. So much so that they crack in the winter.

I can go about 3 months between changing strings. And we gig alot.

I have eczema, so the skin on my hands gets dry blisters and peels, and even cracks occasionally, but I do sweat a lot too.

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3 hours ago, Phil O'Keefe said:

 

I occasionally treat my rosewood fretboards with a little lemon oil, but not my maple necks. 

 

I don't have any guitars with Maple necks. Don't they typically seal them at the factory with lacquer or something?

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21 minutes ago, Tom Hicks said:

I don't have any guitars with Maple necks. Don't they typically seal them at the factory with lacquer or something?

Yes, or polyester or urethane, depending on the guitar. 

 

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