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LOW SENSITIVITY SPEAKER SEARCH,,,

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Hi all~~  I'm looking for something similar to my Celestion 25w Greenback, Avatar A50, & Tone Tubby Chicago Blue, but having the lowest possible sensitivity, of which my TT is the lowest at 94db.  What's the lowest db driver out there that captures the sound & capacity (20-30 watts) of my above speakers?  Many thanks! 

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Depends on the zone of resistance the tranny can deal with vs the resistor value. ie series on the leads or parallel across the speaker.  You need one of the techies here to explain the dos and donts and the math etc...

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There are some Jensen models with fairly low sensitivity but obviously they won't give you the sound you want. I don't know of anything "British voiced" that will. A power soak (attenuator) might be your best bet.

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Yeah,, I have a Weber Mass I just received & have yet to try, but my previous experiences are forewarning. 

Thanks all ~~

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I have to assume that you are trying to lower the output/volume of your amp by decreasing the speaker efficiency, correct?

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Sensitivity?  Speakers are not microphones.  They don't  detect sound they produce it.   

I think you mean SPL which is an efficiency measurement used to determine how loud a speaker is.

They measure the speakers by putting a 1Khz tone at 1 watt through the speaker and measure how loud it is at 1 meter. 

Most guitar speakers are going to produce an SPL in the mid 90's and up.  You may find something really bad ay 90~93dB. There were a bunch of crud speakers produced back in the 70's which were horrible including the ones sold by Radio Shack. Manufacturers have gotten much better at making speakers these days, its unlikely you'll find many with really low SPL settings unless you buy something like Hi Fi or PA speaker.  Years ago I bought some PS speakers on sale.  The sound quality was pretty good but their SPL was pathetically low.  I put them in a cab and use them as an attenuator for recording high wattage cabs.  They can handle 125W RMS each 240W total and since they only have an SPL of 80 they are  2X quieter then my high end Celestions. 

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8 hours ago, WRGKMC said:

Sensitivity?  Speakers are not microphones.  They don't  detect sound they produce it.   

I think you mean SPL which is an efficiency measurement used to determine how loud a speaker is. . . .

Here's the definition from the Klipsch web site, folks who have designed and manufactured speakers for several decades:

Quote

Speaker sensitivity—many times erroneously referred to as speaker efficiency—is used to determine the amount of power necessary to drive or operate a loudspeaker. It is a measurement of the amount of sound output derived from a speaker with one watt of power input from an amplifier. Sensitivity is usually measured with a microphone connected to a sound level meter placed one meter in front of the speaker. The resultant number is expressed in dB.

 

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13 hours ago, DeepEnd said:

Here's the definition from the Klipsch web site, folks who have designed and manufactured speakers for several decades:

 

In Theil/Small usage, "sensitivity" is the commonly used term for the driver's response function to a specified signal, while "reference efficiency" is the calculated energy transfer ratio.  The number most often seen (SPL @ 1W/1m) is the sensitivity number, while efficiency is calculated as a %.  They are different values which are closely related.

Edited by SteinbergerHack

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22 hours ago, WRGKMC said:

Sensitivity?  Speakers are not microphones.  They don't  detect sound they produce it.  

Actually, this is not true. The process a speaker uses to produce sound is essentially the same, but reversed, as the process a dynamic microphone uses to collect sound. A speaker can be used as a microphone, I've done it to make a 'stomp' kick drum sound using an old headphone

 

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19 hours ago, DeepEnd said:

Here's the definition from the Klipsch web site, folks who have designed and manufactured speakers for several decades:

 

Sensitivity is used by many vendors but its only good when comparing speakers made by the same manufacturer. 

Main reason  is they haven't adopted a standard method of measurement when coming up with that number.   They may use Pink noise, White noise, or fixed tones, they may have room reflection/resonance or they may target the peak resonance which makes the speaker look like its louder then it actually is.  

Quote

 

Are Efficiency and Sensitivity the Same?

Yes and no. You'll often see the terms sensitivity and efficiency used interchangeably in audio, which is ok. Most people should know what you mean when you say a speaker has 89 dB efficiency. Technically, efficiency and sensitivity are different, even though they describe the same concept. Sensitivity specifications can be converted to efficiency specifications and vice-versa. Efficiancy is the amount of power going into a speaker that is actually converted into sound. This value is usually less than one percent, which tells you that most of the power sent to a speaker ends up as heat and not sound.

 

This site has all descriptions and  formulas if you want to get into it deep.  http://www.sengpielaudio.com/calculator-efficiency.htm

There's one calculator that's worth playing with listed 3/4 down the page called Loudspeaker sound Pressure Level and Amplified Power.   This tool will calculate how loud a speaker will be at will be at any given wattage if you

  

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On 2/26/2020 at 11:48 AM, daddymack said:

I have to assume that you are trying to lower the output/volume of your amp by decreasing the speaker efficiency, correct?

Yes decrease the amp's cranked output volume. 

Thanks 

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Take a look at the Eminence Reignmaker as it has a adjustment dial on the magnet to change the sensitivity from 92 to 98 db. Eminence does make an American voiced version also.

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10 hours ago, ksl said:

Yes decrease the amp's cranked output volume. 

Thanks 

there are other ways to achieve this...and using a 'lower rated' speaker will change the sound, and likely won't result in a 'very noticeable' perceived volume change when you are in close proximity to the amp.

What is the amp? That is where I would start if I wanted to lower the output while retaining the character. The speakers are the last step in the signal chain, and have less to do with the overall sound and volume than the amp itself. If it is a tube amp, there are plenty of ways to lower the output via tube selection, tube removal. output transformer....

I will go out on a limb and guess the amp does not have a master gain, right? You'd probably be far better off having a master gain pot installed [I know, it will mean the amp is not stock, but it is an upgrade many buyers of used gear appreciate].

Why did you get a Weber Mass, and then not try that first? That is one of the best  'power soak' methods, far more effective than trying to quash the volume with less efficient speakers.

Have you tried the Mass yet? If not, please do, and then get back to us...

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On 2/27/2020 at 3:22 PM, WRGKMC said:

Sensitivity is used by many vendors but its only good when comparing speakers made by the same manufacturer. 

Main reason  is they haven't adopted a standard method of measurement when coming up with that number.   They may use Pink noise, White noise, or fixed tones, they may have room reflection/resonance or they may target the peak resonance which makes the speaker look like its louder then it actually is.  

This site has all descriptions and  formulas if you want to get into it deep.  http://www.sengpielaudio.com/calculator-efficiency.htm

There's one calculator that's worth playing with listed 3/4 down the page called Loudspeaker sound Pressure Level and Amplified Power.   This tool will calculate how loud a speaker will be at will be at any given wattage if you

  

Oh, boy. You specifically told the OP sensitivity isn't a term that describes speakers. Then when multiple posters pointed out that wasn't true you pulled one of your usual stunts and moved the goalposts to make it seem like you were right all along. I posted the quote and link from Klipsch because I knew you wouldn't accept anything that came from me. Turns out you rejected it anyway. Can't say I'm surprised. I do know the difference between efficiency but sensitivity is the measurement but sensitivity is the spec manufacturers typically publish so that's what the OP has to consider.

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