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My biggest show as of yet...........


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Yesterday I did an outdoor festival. I've been moonlighting with a prosound company for a few months.

 

The stage was a trailer type, brand new, beautiful sucker.

 

The rig was 2 double 18 cabs per side with two tops. Tops had 2, 12" EVs and a horn. I was told they were manufactured by a deceased company called Blue Chip. Old boxes but rock solid. The 18"s were reloaded with Kilomax drivers. The subs were run at 2 ohms off Crest amps, close to 5000 watts per side. I'm not sure what the tops were running at.

 

Onstage we had 6 monitors on 4 mixes. We provided full backline.

 

A 32 channel Allen and Heath board was in the field under a tent.

 

I rigged the 100 feeder out to the stage from an outbuilding and did all the distro. Then I wired the stage as the other guys were setting and wiring the speakers. Flawless start up and sound check. The boss says, "John, I gotta go to another job, you're on your own". He leaves me with a helper.

 

My mission, put up 11 bands in 5 hours.

 

Considering the smaller rigs that I own, this was a rush to be behind all this power. We had country, metal, reggae and even a mens accapella group. Ah yes, the Jimmy Buffet tribute too.

 

WHAT DID I LEARN.

 

1) Almost every guy with a big stupid pedal board has issues and wants to blame the SR people for his dead batteries and bad cables..

 

2) People with the most expensive toys usually do not know how to get tone and sound like {censored}. One of the best sounding bands, the guy was using a VOX solid state amp with a ten inch speaker and he wooped ass over dudes with $3k rigs. I learned that if the amp tone is so bad, us SR people cannot fix it from the board and have to just turn it way down.

 

3) Those metal stages are tricky to work with as far as monitoring is concerned. There is nothing to dampen the sound waves and feedback is something that just seems to happen at weird times. I did good with controlling this, perfect no, good yes.

 

I had a really good day! Awsome folks and bands. Awsome system to work with.

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3) Those metal stages are tricky to work with as far as monitoring is concerned. There is nothing to dampen the sound waves and feedback is something that just seems to happen at weird times. I did good with controlling this, perfect no, good yes.

 

The smaller ones yes, the bigger ones aren't a problem. The thing I don't like about the bigger stageline or megastage rigs is that back curtain... it damn near knocked me on my ass a few times. I'm trying to patch a drop snake when a sudden gust of wind sends that curtain straight into me with quite a bit of force.

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Good clean fun
:thu:
.


There are few things more gratifying in a new job than having the person in charge leave you in charge.


Congrats.

 

 

I'm really very lucky to have met this guy, I jammed with him at an open mic, that's how we met.

 

I've done 4 jobs with him. Each time a completely different rig and setting.

 

Job 1, Line Arrays at a college gym for a vocal presentation. DAS powered stuff.

 

Job 2, Plasma TV's and distributed sound for Kentucky Derby at a country club.

 

Job 3, Pakistani wedding, folk drum ensemble, JBL subs and tops.

 

Job 4, the concert rig I described at the top of the thread.

 

I went back to his shop last night. It really blows my mind how much stuff he has. 32 KF 850's! More subs of different types than I could count.

 

It would take many gigs to really know what this guy has and how it all cables together. I mean, yea, it's all the same, but each rig has it's own loaded work boxes full of stuff and each rack is kind of different.

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