Jump to content

My "too loud" complaint


Kramerguy

Recommended Posts

  • Members

I completely agree Grant, and my rant is probably just a byproduct of my frustration with players who cannot look at the composition as a whole.  I try not to be negative in most spaces of my life, and occasionally have to have some verbal diarrhea to purge myself of these frustrations :)

I'm all about what I call the 9th note - the rest.  Most people I play with seem to have this desperate need to fill every possible moment with sound.  A good example is the drummer who rides the crash symbols, which when in a non-creshendo moment tends to stomp all over everyone.  I've seen guitarists do the same.  One of my friends, who is arguably a better guitarist than myself, tends to drag out solos that have no point or story- just random phrasing tossed together in meaningless and endless existence.  He also tends to turn up over everyone and there's been times where I was doing a breathable 4-measure solo only to have him step in on measure 2 or 3, and play over me, effectively stealing the solo.  I avoid inviting him to jams now just because he cannot seem to control himself, and it's a shame as he is a childhood friend and a great guy outside of when he's got a guitar.

Anyways, I'm sorry for being negative, I guess my frustrations are more about not being able to find the quality of musician that I had hoped to, but I don't give up easy... the search continues!  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

It's nice; all those ideals. In my abandoned search for "my people" I learned the smart money is on specially phony people. They are the culmination of talent and preparation. The professional team player demeanor requires copious funding. No star for me. The gene pool around here too is strictly homeboy; good life, not much good music. Given those cards, I went back to what me play for.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

My advice would be to record rehearsals and use the recordings to learn as a band about balance. Also play the originals and compare. I have a stereo ribbon mic I use as it does not hype cymbals like a cheap condenser mic, but any 2 trk recording is a good start.   I'm older and have lived this in so many bands. My philosophy is we are character actors and the vocal is the lead role. Our job is to support the vocal or soloist at that point in the song.  Are we trying to be entertainers or trying to entertain ourselves?  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
  • 4 months later...
  • Members
On 1/6/2020 at 6:14 PM, Kramerguy said:

 

So while in both cases, all of the guys had good chops, timing, and musicianship.  Yet at the same time, none seemed to understand dynamic.  It's just jack that crap to 11 and hold onto something...  How can people my own age still be stuck in this cycle?  Why does it seem like the majority of them rather than a minority, just don't get it- which is what I would think that over time these guys should have learned?  I'm just beside myself today, thinking about it, listening back to the recordings and face palming it.

dynamics are an integral part of basic musicianship...   a person holding an instrument that is not able to follow dynamics, or other foundational concepts,  is not a good musician, not even decent...  but poorly trained and ignorant of the position they are faking...  music is a language and it sounds to me that youre working with toddlers incapable of forming complete, functional sentences...   there is a difference between musicians and posers... even when said posers have good timing and technical ability, they are still not capable of good musicianship without a complete grasp of the language...  example...  a drummer that can play all their parts so softly you can barely hear it, at speed...  volume and speed should be independent of each other, if one has good chops...  if one is a musician...  and not just another second rate hack with an ego that needs checked...  

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

Hold it fellas, I'm afraid you're just too darn loud.

Two years ago, Huey Lewis was diagnosed with Meniere's disease, a disorder affecting the inner ear that can trigger spells of dizziness and hearing loss. ... Lewis can still hear out of his left ear, but he says it's sporadic and distorted. He says his left ear was once his good ear.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
  • Members

The last band I was in had a fairly professional setup always with in-ear monitors and sound guy on hire. I wasn't a fan of the in-ear monitors to any great extent however it definitely kept stage volume lower and I had the ability to tweak the mix to my liking. As my main position was keyboards that was especially important due to the large frequency range inherent with keys. I also played some rhythm and lead guitar and was happy using a Sansamp Fly Rig. They actually badgered me into bringing an amp so I started taking my little 5 watt '59 Gibson Skylark, the sound guy would mic it and it sounded great.

I suppose the thing is though, none of that would matter if you don't have top notch players and a great sound guy to mix it all. There was no way for me to know how the sound was out front. The drummer used a mix of acoustic and electronic drums which probably helped also as typically the drums are going to set the minimal level on stage in a band setting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members
20 hours ago, Notes_Norton said:

In ear monitors, floor wedges or whatever, the band really never knows what it sounds like out front.

In our duo I'm using a wireless on my guitar so I can actually walk out front and check the sound/level of our playing but not my vocal which is probably the most important part.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

I've played classical, and the sound guy has only one of the many functions of the orchestra conductor, balance.

The conductor is the musician who plays the orchestra. Tempos, dynamics, balance, intensity, articulation, ornaments and so on, plus he/she is also the manager.

In our duo, we do a sound test before the people come in. One of us goes out to listen, but when the sound absorbing humans arrive, all bets are off. We have a few regular audience members who will tell us when they think it sounds off, often with specifics like the sax is drowning out the vocals. (grrrrrrrrrrrr) 

 

Notes

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...