Jump to content

Question For Bands That Use Backing Tracks


Recommended Posts

  • Members

For smaller Single and Duo type groups, when you have drums, bass etc on backing tracks for gigs, what type of backing tracks do you use (MIDI, MP3) and what equipment do you use?

 

I'm interested in getting something going but I'm not sure which way would be best. I play guitar and my partner has a Yamaha Motif XS6 Keyboard.

 

Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

For smaller Single and Duo type groups, when you have drums, bass etc on backing tracks for gigs, what type of backing tracks do you use (MIDI, MP3) and what equipment do you use?


I'm interested in getting something going but I'm not sure which way would be best. I play guitar and my partner has a Yamaha Motif XS6 Keyboard.


Thanks

 

 

Use the onboard sequencer in the Motif.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

by KAF:


Not sure, but I don't think its memory will hold a bunch of songs.

 

 

I believe the sequencer memory capacity of the XS is the same or a little more than the ES, which I have. From what i understand, the xs also has some non-volatile memory that will hold a small amount of data after the XS is shut down, i don't know the capacity because I don't own an XS. When I shut off my ES8, everything is gone when I power back up.

 

I use the ES internal memory plus sample memory for non-ROM sounds and voices that are not in my ES8 for my classic rock songs Depending upon how long the songs are, and how much data you actually have in each song, you should be able to put an entire set into the internal memory without having to load songs during the set. I have my sets all saved with each set having a name and placed in a folder for live shows. If i get a request for a song during a set, I can erase songs that I already played to make room and load individual songs that I get requests for during a set.

 

I have as many as 15 to 18 songs in my sets so I don't have to play all of them during a set, in case what I planned on playing is not going over. Then I just load another set.

 

If I get in a situation that I feel other songs that are loaded into a set are going to work for the crowd, when I take a break I erase the sequencer memory and load one song at a time, or load a set and erase half of it and fill the rest of the set up with individual songs. It doesn't take long because I'm fairly organized.

 

If you are going to use MIDI songs you find on the internet, you will need to go over each track to see what is on them and eliminate unnecessary information to save space. Unnecessary drum sounds can be deleted because each on is an "event" and takes up memory.

 

I go over my songs pretty well to eliminate crap that shouldn't be on each track and also change the sounds. A lot of sequences you find on the internet will use GM sounds, which are not the best, but it will give you a hint as to what type of instrument sound is on each track. Some songs on the internet are not done very well and aren't worth fixing, so I do my own sometimes too.

 

I don't use MP3's because so far I haven't liked the way they sound compared to what I can get out of my ES8 running through a good PA amp, EQ, FX, and speakers. Doing sequences is a necessity for my classic rock act, because I am a solo. It works. Some players I know say they use MP3 and are happy with the sound. They use a iPOD and play it through their system.

 

You don't have to use a computer to get good results.

 

 

Mike T.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

 

I believe the sequencer memory capacity of the XS is the same or a little more than the ES, which I have. From what i understand, the xs also has some non-volatile memory that will hold a small amount of data after the XS is shut down, i don't know the capacity because I don't own an XS. When I shut off my ES8, everything is gone when I power back up.


I use the ES internal memory plus sample memory for non-ROM sounds and voices that are not in my ES8 for my classic rock songs Depending upon how long the songs are, and how much data you actually have in each song, you should be able to put an entire set into the internal memory without having to load songs during the set. I have my sets all saved with each set having a name and placed in a folder for live shows. If i get a request for a song during a set, I can erase songs that I already played to make room and load individual songs that I get requests for during a set.


I have as many as 15 to 18 songs in my sets so I don't have to play all of them during a set, in case what I planned on playing is not going over. Then I just load another set.


If I get in a situation that I feel other songs that are loaded into a set are going to work for the crowd, when I take a break I erase the sequencer memory and load one song at a time, or load a set and erase half of it and fill the rest of the set up with individual songs. It doesn't take long because I'm fairly organized.


If you are going to use MIDI songs you find on the internet, you will need to go over each track to see what is on them and eliminate unnecessary information to save space. Unnecessary drum sounds can be deleted because each on is an "event" and takes up memory.


I go over my songs pretty well to eliminate crap that shouldn't be on each track and also change the sounds. A lot of sequences you find on the internet will use GM sounds, which are not the best, but it will give you a hint as to what type of instrument sound is on each track. Some songs on the internet are not done very well and aren't worth fixing, so I do my own sometimes too.


I don't use MP3's because so far I haven't liked the way they sound compared to what I can get out of my ES8 running through a good PA amp, EQ, FX, and speakers. Doing sequences is a necessity for my classic rock act, because I am a solo. It works. Some players I know say they use MP3 and are happy with the sound. They use a iPOD and play it through their system.


You don't have to use a computer to get good results.



Mike T.

 

 

Do you load the set list via a flash Memory drive? And do you have some kind of backup in case your keyboard dies?

 

Thanks for this info.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Members

I have about 10 flash drives, they're not very expensive so I have a lot of spares. I backup everything, not only my sets and individual songs, I back up all the sound libraries that Yamaha had/has on Motifator.com as well as my User Voices and ALL file data that saves my setup and configuration information. I also back these files up to my personal computer.

 

I don't have a "spare" Motif ES8. I've used it on a regular basis (usually daily) for 6 years without any problems. I use it for creating my sequences, daily practice, and gigs. I move it myself in a flight case, and handle it with great care. I can't afford to run out and buy another one if anything would happen to it so I'm VERY careful with it. Its been 100% reliable, as all equipment I ever bought from Yamaha has been.

 

One last thing, I installed memory for samples in my ES8 so I can load voice libraries that are not from my ES8, and WAV files. i use a number of sound effects in my songs if the song calls for it and this is a great way to do it.

 

Your KB player's XS goes a step further than the ES series. More user locations for sounds, acoustic piano with half pedal capability, and a bit more memory in the sequencer memory. Great sounds too. The Motif is a great tool for creating and playing back sequences for a live show or to quickly record an original song when inspiration hits you. :thu:

 

 

Cheers,

 

 

 

Mike T.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...