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Which EQ?


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Well, I'm finally getting off my ass and finishing the update on my band's PA. The "B" powered mixer is going by by! We're a 5 piece that plays classic rock covers to anywhere from 25 to 75 people, indoors and out. Nothing fancy, nothing too loud (I use a 15 watt guitar amp).

 

I have a PV14 mixer, a Peavey IPR 1600 amp, and will be getting another IPR for the monitors. I'll probably get the 4500 for the mains, and switch the 1600to monitor duty, which is covered by the Bherringer now.

 

We run 2 old Peavey monitors and 2 Yorkvill monitors, and a pair of 15 inch Hughs and Kettner mains on poles. Might be getting a deal ($300) on a pair of Yamaha series V 15' clubs for FOH soon. No subs but might have a deal on those, too. ($500 for a pair of EV T-18's)

 

I'm looking at 2 EQs. A 2x15 for the mains and a 1x31 for the monitors. We run the mains in stereo because we run background music through the rig during breaks. My question is, what's the difference in EQ's? It seems like a huge price range on these things. What makes one better than the other? What are the must have features I'll need, and what's BS? What features/brands do I stay away from?

 

I'm looking at the DBX 231, the Alesis M EQ 230, and the like. Used for around $50-$75 seems average.

 

Thoughts and/or recommendations?

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A used DBX 231 at that price would be a steal.

 

 

As usual, you are right. I was looking at the 215, not the 231.

 

Would that be fine? We never seem to have any feedback issues now. Also, how are the Peavey, BBE, and Samson eq's? Any good?

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most of the 215 eqs that i've seen tend to take 2 spaces just like the dbx231. at that point the 215 is nothing but a disadvantage since you have less control but it still takes up the same rack space.

 

get a 231 to use on monitors and then add another for mains as the budget allows. if you are not having feedback problems then you would just be using the EQ to correct for the room and maybe you could do without for a while. most around here will tell you that a 215 is a waste of money and to consider other options.

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The DBX 215 is 1 space, and is many of the 215's.

 

 

right you are. i stand corrected.

 

it's been so long since i looked at eqs of that type that i guess i spoke too quickly. i've seen a lot of these in local bands rigs around here. maybe one of the local stores just likes to push them or something.

 

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/QF215/

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Good question, I read a few threads over on prosound about folks using a parametric eq which they claim yields better results then a GEQ. Which raises the question which is better? For me I just don't know enough about them and would more then likely end up with a disaster.

I do know how to use a GEQ because it's laid out pretty simple you just grab and specific frequency and cut it or boost it. BTW always cut.

 

Sorry didn't mean to high jack your thread and change the topic.

I'm just curious to parametric eq and why seasoned SR folks prefer them over a GEQ.

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Good question, I read a few threads over on prosound about folks using a parametric eq which they claim yields better results then a GEQ. Which raises the question which is better? For me I just don't know enough about them and would more then likely end up with a disaster.

I do know how to use a GEQ because it's laid out pretty simple you just grab and specific frequency and cut it or boost it. BTW always cut.


Sorry didn't mean to high jack your thread and change the topic.

I'm just curious to parametric eq and why seasoned SR folks prefer them over a GEQ.

 

 

A PEQ allows you to go direct to the specific frequency of interest, and most then allow you to adjust the "Q", or width of the adjustment. A GEQ has fixed frequencies and "Q" for each of the preset bands.

 

The limitation of a PEQ is that you will only have a handful of adjustment points you can use. In most cases, though, this will cover the problem areas; with good equipment and a reasonable room it's not a problem. The other "limitation" is that you have to be able to determine what frequency needs to be adjusted, and understand the type of problem you're dealing with so that you can properly use the bandwidth adjustment. The upside is that you can make very precise adjustments that minimze the negative impacts on the rest of the spectrum.

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I usually use parametric (typically within my speaker processors) to fine tune an individual speaker cabinet for the long-term. I use a graphic as adjustment on an overall system to make up for room anomalies. For me, a graphic is really the only tool for adjusting monitors. It's just far faster to identify frequencies and cut them in the heat of battle than on a parametric. I love using Varicurves (digitally controlled analog parametric) for FOH work or as an insert.

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31 band. 15 band is useless (except as a tone control or a comp/gate sidechain EQ).

 

The MEQ is rubbish (unless you need a doorstop).

 

The 231 works well, but making small adjustments is a bit tricky - get the 1231 if you can.

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I agree on the long throw faders. Much easier to make cuts than with a short throw. The 231 works fine, but if you cut to much by mistake you can easily suck the life out of the box you are adjusting. I don't worry about it as much on a monitor as I do on the mains. I switched to the 2231 for mains after about 3 mistakes. But I'm old... LOL Both can be found on EBAY or CL reasonable if you have patience. I recently picked up a pair of 1231's for my monitors for $280.

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