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There are a lot of advantages... especially to a noob (but not just for noobs). Most notably, you get an amplifier that is perfectly matched to the speakers (power ratings, crossover points, eq, etc.). They can also aide your set up (less to carry, connect, configure, etc.). Most of the detail work is done for you. They are not idiot proof, but they are as close as you're gonna get.

 

Essentially, plug 'em into your board, power 'em up, and let the music flow. Just watch your clip lights, and you'll be fine.

 

If you are completely new, I'd suggest you read through as many previous posts as you can stomach. Just about everyone starting out has the same questions. Many of them have been posed and discussed here. It will make a very good primer for you.

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Hey there,

 

A negative side to powered mains would be that if you blow the amp, you also loose the speaker, at least untill you get it repaired, the chances of that happening will depend on the quality of what you get to start off with.

 

I am a musician, not a tech guy and I have found that this forum has answered every question I could come up with, you are in the right place to learn and to get help from people who know more than both of us combined!

 

I just bought new powered speakers by the way, for my use I went with EV ZXA1. Post your band info and needs so people can help you better.

 

Rod

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A negative side to powered mains would be that if you blow the amp, you also loose the speaker, at least untill you get it repaired, the chances of that happening will depend on the quality of what you get to start off with.

 

 

This is true of amp failures regardless of whether they are in an active cabinet or connected to a passive cab. Regardless, most people should use active speakers.

 

Active cabs have properly matched amplifiers, processing designed by engineers who design the entire speaker *system*, and take a lot of the guess work out of designing a speaker system.

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Thank you. I have posted a few questions earlier in the week and read as much as possible so am learning S L O W L Y (
:p
). ON the clip light, is this going to flash on the individual speaker or the board?


Thanks again.

 

The clip light I was referring to is on the speakers. But, you don't want clipping anywhere in the chain. To get the most out of any system, you will want to optimize the gains throughout the system so that essentially everything clips at the same time.

 

So, the next question you'll ask is, "how do I do that?"... That is a bigger explaination than I have time to type now, and this has been discussed here (and SO many other places) enough times. I would suggest you search and read up on this topic.

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This is true of amp failures regardless of whether they are in an active cabinet or connected to a passive cab. Regardless, most people should use active speakers.


Active cabs have properly matched amplifiers, processing designed by engineers who design the entire speaker *system*, and take a lot of the guess work out of designing a speaker system.

 

 

 

Agree 100%, just pointing out one possible issue that's all, I am all for powered speakers!

 

Rod

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The clip light I was referring to is on the speakers. But, you don't want clipping anywhere in the chain. To get the most out of any system, you will want to optimize the gains throughout the system so that essentially everything clips at the same time.

 

No, no, no :facepalm:

 

Good grief, since ALL powered speakers (of the type we would encounter here) contain internal clip limiters, you want to have the powered speaker limit LED flash AT LEAST 6dB before anything else comes close to clipping. I would recommend 9dB. This 6-9dB is the range over which the limiter operates and is absolutely essential in order for the limiter to work properly.

 

Otherwise, as you hit the limit point of the amp, the signal becomes clipped from the drive electronics and the amp will be reproducing a clipped signal at the limit point. This is just about the worst possible scenario.

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