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worst room ever


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i had to laugh though,,one of the clients was at setup,,i was playing pink through lows and subs,and he commented to the production manager that it sounded just like an aircraft and where did we find that special fx track,,and could we use it during the show,, :facepalm:

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we did a show tonight in a C-130 aircraft hanger,,,OMG!!!! i think i can still hear the verb

 

 

A downtown Cincinnati Hotel ballroom called the hall of mirrors

in truth a pretty quick decay time with a few spikey delay pings

the heavy complete floor carpet made it less of the Worst,,

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Played 2 gigs in a 17th century restored church - although empty - no pews - no seats - no nothing - only standing audience - now that was really horrible - in the old these churches were built in such a way that the man in the pulpit could be heard throughout the church without amplification - just imagine saying "dearly belovedddddddddddd" without shouting and hearing yourself 4 or 5 times

 

greetz

Will

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Played 2 gigs in a 17th century restored church - although empty - no pews - no seats - no nothing - only standing audience - now that was really horrible - in the old these churches were built in such a way that the man in the pulpit could be heard throughout the church without amplification - just imagine saying "dearly belovedddddddddddd" without shouting and hearing yourself 4 or 5 times


greetz

Will

 

 

If you got the timing of the echoes just right, you could use that as a natural looper.

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Because the decay of multiple narrow bandwidth tones without rapid risetimes and their reflections are more musically related to the simpler fundamental. Same applies to pure singing voices. Intelligability is not the goal as it does not matter. That's why choral pieces are arranged the way they are.

 

Listen to classical and chamber music, it's built around the live environments that were common in buildings of the time period.

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We used to have a local concert house, in the days before arenas (think early to mid-60's.) It was a dome that sat about 500 people if they crowded together really close. I don't recall if it was metal or concrete. During the day, every show you paid to see happened there. The sound generally sucked because of the surfaces and shape. Can't tell you how many great shows still happened there...

 

Jimi Hendrix

Rolling Stones

The Who

3 Dog Night

Flo and Eddy with the Turtles

Steppenwolf

 

The list goes on. But you know, in spite of the generally bad sound, crowded conditions, etc., I still remember it as the place where the best shows of my life happened. It was close up and personal. When was the last time you heard the Stones play for a group of 500? Imagine being about 20 ft from Hendrix? I guess memory fails for the bad parts, but I sure miss that place. The city decided to tear it down and make a parking lot once the neighboring city built a multi-purpose arena. Promoters made a lot more money, but the shows were never the same....

 

Sometimes I'll trade great sound for up close and personal.

 

Speaking of that, anyone here ever go Painter's Mill near Baltimore? I went with friends one night to see a forgettable headliner I wanted to see. They agreed to go because of the warmup band. I would guess the place seats 500-1000 (too long ago to remember well.) I do know it was in-the-round for all shows since it had a permanent stage in the middle of a round building. I think they had about a 30 ft round stage, and over the stage, almost touching all the way around, were A7 cabinets. On the outside wall, at ceiling height all the way around they had another A7 about every 10 ft. It sounded fabulous.

 

The band didn't hurt the sound either. I had never heard of them (then) but walked in to see Roberta Flack as headliner, and the unknown warmup band was called Return to Forever. Chic Corea, Lenny White, Stanley Clarke and Al DiMeola. They didn't suck.......great sound and intimate. Maybe the best show I have ever been to when you add up everything.

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Likely because the pipe organ is loud enough to overcome the room reverb.


Beautiful room, though. What's is called?

 

 

Woolsey Hall, Yale University

 

Yeah, as long as it's unamplified it sounds OK. Singing groups, orchestras, etc. As soon as you introduce speakers and/or amplified instruments in the room, things get messy. You've got it exactly right, though. You either have to keep it low enough not to excite the room, or have enough firepower to overcome it.

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